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博物館 - Guggenheim, Harvard Art, Forbes House, China Institute

The Great Bridge: Matter and Memory of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge
Saturday, September 96:00-7:30PM
Refreshments will be served at 5:30-6:00 pm
Event fee: Free Admission
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006

Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge is one of the most significant cultural emblems of China in the 1960s-70s. Being regarded as both a political victory and a technological achievement, the Great Bridge became a popular icon that entered people's everyday lives nationwide. In this lecture, Professor Andong Lu will introduce the 'Memory Project of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge', a research on collective memory and a bottom-up urban regeneration project, and interpret the artefacts and memories of the Great Bridge from a historical perspective to reveal this unprecedented landscape of collective memory. Professor Andong Lu completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge and was elected a Fellow of Wolfson College. He is now Professor at the School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Nanjing University. He initiated the Memory Project of the Grand Bridge together with a group of scholars and volunteers, intending to revitalize the memories of the bridge and to create a contemporary place of memory. Prof. Lu was extensively quoted in a recent CNN report "How the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge changed China forever" 

This Lecture will be conducted in Chinese, with no interpretation. Free, but advance registration is required.

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MYSTICAL SYMBOLISM PROGRAM

Vexations
Tuesday, September 26, 7 pm–Wednesday, September 27, 1 pm

This durational concert presents Erik Satie’s Vexations (1893), featuring a roster of established and emerging pianists from both classical and avant-garde spheres, including Timo Andres, Philip Corner, Sylvie Courvoisier, Karl Larson, Anne Queffélec, Joshua Rifkin, and Margaret Leng Tan. Satie composed this iconic piece on the heels of ending his involvement with the Salon de la Rose+Croix. It is unknown whether Satie intended for the work to be played or if it was simply a sort of jest directed at the esoteric excesses of Joséphin Péladan, the founder of the Salon. But the unlikely piece attracted the attention of John Cage, who first staged it. Cage organized a concert in New York in 1963 featuring contemporary musicians such as John Cale, James Tenney, David Tudor, and Christian Wolff, among others. In observance of one of Satie’s instructions, the score was repeated 840 times, lasting for almost 19 hours in an unprecedented serial undertaking that echoed the Minimalist and Conceptual concerns of the 1960s. More than 50 years later, the Guggenheim will once again present Vexations to a New York audience. A full list of performers and schedule will be announced in September.
$15 (includes after-hours viewing of Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897), $12 members, $10 students during after-hours portion of the program. Free with admission during museum hours on Wednesday, September 27. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
This program is supported in part by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the Consulate General of Switzerland, New York.
Furniture in Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897 courtesy of Roche Bobois. Additional support provided by the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia.

ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD PROGRAMS

“Turn It On: China on Film, 2000–2017”
Fridays and Saturdays, October 13–December 16, Daytime Screenings Vary, Evening Screenings at 6:30 pm

Cocurated by Ai Weiwei and Wang Fen, this series presents 20 independent documentaries by China’s most daring artists and filmmakers investigating the political, social, economic, and cultural conditions of contemporary China. This 10-week festival encompasses twice-weekly daytime screenings and three featured evening events, and is presented concurrently with the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, on view October 6, 2017–January 7, 2018.
Daytime screenings take place in the New Media Theater and are free with museum admission. Evening screenings at 6:30 pm include a Q&A session with filmmakers and require a ticket. $20, $15 members, $10 students. For the full schedule, visit guggenheim.org/turniton.

Nightingale, Not the Only Voice 夜莺不是唯一的歌喉, 2000
Directed by Tang Danhong 唐丹鸿
Mandarin with English subtitles, 180 min.
Friday, October 13, 6:30 pm

Nightingale, Not the Only Voice follows the lives of three artists, including the film’s director, on their shared journey through real and psychological oppression to self-discovery. Tang Danhong examines her past—particularly her relationship with her parents—and looks at the painful, formative moments that inform her current psychological state, her life, and her art.
A Q&A with Tang Danhong, moderated by Chip Rolley, Senior Director of Literary Programs, PEN America, follows the screening.

We the Workers 凶年之畔, 2017
Directed by Huang Wenhai 黄文海
Mandarin with English subtitles, 173 min.
Friday, November 3, 6:30 pm

For over 30 years, China has been swept up in rapid capitalist development. The “China miracle” has been built on the backs of hundreds of millions of migrant laborers. This film features workers from different provinces spanning two generations who have resisted this force through activist struggle and action.
A Q&A with Huang Wenhai, moderated by Suzanne Nossel, Executive Director, PEN America, follows the screening.

Fairytale 童话, 2007
Directed by Ai Weiwei 艾未未
Mandarin with English subtitles, 153 min.
Friday, December 15, 6:30 pm

In 2007 Ai Weiwei took part in Documenta 12 with a participatory event called Fairytale, after the Brothers Grimm who were born in Kassel, the German city that hosts the famed art exhibition. Ai invited 1,001 people from China, many of whom had never been abroad before, to travel to Germany, live in a dormitory of Ai’s design, and freely wander the city and the exhibition. Ai’s studio recruited the applicants from the Internet. He also sent 1,001 Ming period–style wooden chairs, which were arranged throughout the exhibition hall as gathering spaces. The film opens with the project’s inception and takes us through its full enactment, recording the experiences of participants of all backgrounds to create a series of portraits woven together by a single event.
Includes a Q&A (speakers to be announced).
Organized by the Guggenheim Museum in conjunction with Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World. Presented in collaboration with PEN America. Support is provided by The Hayden Family Foundation.

The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg, 2016
Directed by Michael Schindhelm
93 min., Courtesy Icarus Films
Friday, January 5, 6:30 pm

Ai Weiwei credits him with launching his international career. Renowned pianist Lang Lang describes him as a mentor to Chinese artists. Chinese art curator Victoria Lu says his influence has been felt around the world. When Swiss businessman Uli Sigg first went to China, art was far from his mind. But once he began to seek out contemporary artists, it changed his life, theirs, and the international art scene for generations to come. The Chinese Lives of Uli Sigg, directed by art historian Michael Schindhelm and produced by Marcel Hoehn, is a history of China’s opening to the West through the eyes of Sigg and the dazzling array of contemporary Chinese artists he championed. Luminaries including Ai, Cao Chong’en, Cao Fei, Feng Mengbo, Gang Lijun, Shao Fan, Wang Guangyi, and Zeng Fanzhi are interviewed along with curators, diplomats, architects, and business colleagues in this colorful documentary of contemporary Chinese art. The screening is followed by a reception and exhibition viewing.
$15, $10 members, $5 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generous support, with special thanks to Cochairs Thomas and Lynn Ou and Liam Wee Tay and Cindy Chua-Tay, Trustee, as well as Karen Lo, Sophia Ma, Jane Yong, Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Yasko Tashiro Porté and Thierry Porté, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang, Jane Q. Zhao, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation. Funding is also provided by the W.L.S. Spencer Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, The Nancy Foss Heath and Richard B. Heath Educational, Cultural and Environmental Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

ARCHTOBER

In conjunction with Archtober—New York City’s monthlong celebration of architecture and design—and the 20th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Guggenheim Museum presents a suite of workshops, tours, and public programs that provide an up-close look at Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic design. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Saturday Sketching
Saturdays, October 7–28, 10 am–4 pm              

Drawing materials and prompts are available in the rotunda on a drop-in basis for visitors. Study Frank Lloyd Wright’s design and develop a deeper understanding of the Guggenheim museum’s architecture.
Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Art in the Round Public Tours
Saturdays, October 7–28, 2 pm

Free tours with a special focus on the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Specialists in art history and gallery teaching lead these informative and engaging experiences for visitors of all ages and abilities.
Free with museum admission (meet in the rotunda, no registration required). For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

After-Hours Architecture Tour
Wednesday, October 11, 6 pm

A unique chance to join a small-group tour of the museum after it closes to the public. Ashley Mendelsohn, Curatorial Assistant of Architecture and Digital Initiatives, gives an in-depth look at the iconic Wright-designed building and its history.
$45, $40 members. Registration required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Drawing the Guggenheim: New York, Venice, Bilbao
Sunday, October 15, 10 am–4 pm

In a collaboration among sister museums Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, visitors to all museums on Sunday, October 15, have the opportunity to explore and sketch the buildings’ iconic architecture through a variety of public programs, tours, and workshops. Online, museum visitors can share their work and view drawings from around the world using #DrawingtheGugg.
New York events include:
  • Drawing the Guggenheim (10 am–1 pm): A workshop that uses drawing to study Frank Lloyd Wright’s design for the Guggenheim. After a short classroom presentation and guided tour, participants draw from various perspectives in the museum and then reflect on their discoveries together. No prior drawing experience is required. $25 per person (includes materials). Registration required.
  • Family Architecture Tour (10:30 am‐12 pm): A family-friendly exploration of the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. For families with children ages 8 and up. $30 per family, $15 members (includes admission). Registration required.
  • Open Studio (1–4 pm): Drop-in architecture-focused projects in the Studio Art Lab. For families with children ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission, no registration required.
  • Art in the Round (2 pm): An architecture-focused public tour for visitors of all ages. Free with museum admission, no registration required.
  • Drop-in Sketching (10 am–4 pm): Drawing prompts and materials for all visitors will be available throughout the museum for self-directed exploration. Free with admission, no registration required.
  • Film Screenings (11 am and 3:30 pm): In Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum(2010), 85 min., architectural historian Neil Levine leads viewers through an engaging and personal tour of the building and its history. Screenings are free with museum admission and take place in the New Media Theater.
For more information, visit guggenheim.org/archtober.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao 20th Anniversary

This October, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao celebrates its milestone 20th anniversary as a catalyst for art and culture in Spain’s Basque Country. In the two decades since its opening, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has staged over 160 exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, and welcomes more than 1 million visitors annually. Special events around the anniversary include “Reflections,” a large-scale video projection on the iconic building’s facade, hosted on the evenings of October 11–14. The Guggenheim Museum in New York joins the celebration with new blog and video content on guggenheim.org and photos from anniversary celebrations shared on social media channels.
For more information and details on events and exhibitions in Bilbao, visit xx.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/.

MIDDLE EASTERN CIRCLE PRESENTS

An Evening with Slavs and Tatars
Wednesday, November 1, 6:30 pm

Artist collective Slavs and Tatars presents the New York premiere of I Utter Other (2014–present), a lecture-performance addressing the legacy of Orientalism in the Russian and Soviet context. Weaving together scholarship, satire, and comedy, I Utter Other looks to Edward Said’s seminal masterpiece Orientalism (1978) and asks what it means when one East looks to another East. Slavs and Tatars make visible the myriad assumptions that accompany public communication, translation, and historical remembering, especially as pertains to their ongoing research into the fluid geographies that lie between the former Berlin Wall and the Great Wall of China.
$15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Funding is provided by members of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Middle Eastern Circle.

ACADEMY OF AMERICAN POETS’ ANNUAL BLANEY LECTURE

An Evening with Claudia Rankine
Thursday, November 30, 6:30 pm

MacArthur “Genuis,” Academy of American Poets Chancellor, and best-selling poet Claudia Rankine delivers a talk on contemporary poetry and poetics, followed by a reception and book sale and signing in the Guggenheim’s famed Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda. Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric (2014), winner of the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry and the 2016 Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt Book Prize for Poetry, among other distinctions, and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric (2004). She has written two plays and edited several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind (2015). Rankine is currently the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry at Yale University in the departments of African American Studies and English. The Blaney Lecture, offered annually by a prominent poet, was created in memory of former Academy of American Poets board member Dr. Dorothy Gulbenkian Blaney by a gift from her estate. This event is copresented by the Academy of American Poets and the Guggenheim Museum.
$30, $25 Guggenheim and Academy of American Poets members, $15 students. Members’ presale ticketing begins August 30. General admission tickets go on sale September 1. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

ART AFTER DARK

Art After Dark: Halloween
Friday, October 27, 9 pm–Midnight; Exclusive Members’ Hour: 8–9 pm

A special Halloween-themed iteration of the Guggenheim’s popular after-hours series Art After Dark. The event will feature a private viewing of the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, a cash bar, and live DJ performance.
$65, $40 members. Limited tickets will go on sale in September. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. No tickets are sold at the door.

Art After Dark
Friday, December 1, 9 pm–Midnight; Exclusive Members’ Hour: 8–9 pm

An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions including Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World and Josef Albers in Mexico, featuring a cash bar and live musical entertainment.
$25, members free. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door.
Art After Dark is supported in part by SHOWTIME®.

MIND’S EYE TOURS

Select Mondays, 6:30 pm, and Wednesdays, 2 pm

For visitors who are blind or have low vision, tours and workshops focused on the Guggenheim’s exhibitions are presented through verbal description, conversation, and sensory methods.
September 13, 2–4 pm: Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892-1897
November 1, 2–4 pm: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World
December 11, 6:30–8:30 pm: Holiday Gathering
Free, RSVP required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/mindseye.

CURATOR’S EYE AND CONSERVATOR’S EYE TOURS

Wednesdays, 12 pm

Public gallery tours led by exhibition curators.
August 23: Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892-1897
Vivien Greene, Senior Curator, 19th-and Early 20th-Century Art
October 11: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World
Philip Tinari, Director, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art and Guest Cocurator
November 15: Art and China after 1989: Theater of the WorldAlexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts

Free with museum admission. Tours interpreted in American Sign Language (ASL) upon request. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

Boston Children’s Museum to Host Boston’s Second Annual Maker Faire 
September 17, 2017 Boston Celebrates the Maker Movement
BOSTON, MA – August 22, 2017 – Boston Children’s Museum announced that in collaboration with Maker Media, WBZ-TV/CBS Boston, Boston Public Schools and the City of Boston it will host the second annual Boston Mini Maker Faire event on Sunday, September 17, 2017.  The Boston Mini Maker Faire will be held inside and outside the Museum on Fort Point Channel. 
The Maker Faire is an exuberant celebration of the innovation and creativity that radiates across Boston and its surrounding communities. Part science fair, part county fair, and part something entirely new, Maker Faire is an all-ages celebration of creative ingenuity in all its forms. It is an opportunity for the creative doers that make Boston an international leader in innovation to share their work and inspire the next generation of visionaries to go out and change the world. 
The Boston Mini Maker Faire brings together Boston’s technology innovators, designers, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, crafters, students, and more, and introduces them to the thousands of adults and children that attend the event. All of these “makers” come to the Boston Mini Maker Faire to show what they create with their bare hands and bold minds, and to share how they do it, why they do it, and what they learn. The Boston Mini Maker Faire is an event that inspires children and adults to think creatively and innovatively and to connect with people and projects in their own communities.
 
The maker movement, inspired by the desire to create and invent, and enabled by new tools such as 3D software and printers, desktop machine tools, laser cutters, electronics kits, and the growth of shared spaces where makers can access more advanced fabrication tools, is nurturing a new wave of hands-on innovation and entrepreneurship. The maker movement celebrates learning through doing, and the spirit of sharing.
Maker Faire sponsors, who help make the event possible, include AutodeskBose CorporationMathWorksNational GridSkyworks Solutions, Inc.UltimakerVelcro CompaniesVertex and Senator William "Mo" Cowan and Mrs. Stacy L. Cowan. With the support of these and other sponsors, the Museum has been able to expand the Faire in year two, and inspire an even wider range of families, educators, kids of all ages, and anyone who likes to tinker, imagine, and create. Corporations interested in Maker Faire sponsorships should visithttp://boston.makerfaire.com/become-a-sponsor/
The Museum invites local makers to showcase their ingenuity and creativity at the Maker Faire event. Interested makers can apply to host a booth at the event by emailing contact@makerfaireboston.com
“Today’s young Makers are tomorrow’s innovators, engineers, artists, and creative thinkers. The Boston Mini Maker Faire is a marketplace of possibilities for these future leaders,” said Carole Charnow President & CEO. “It is an event where children and adults alike are exposed to the amazing, the ingenious, and the captivating; and where anyone can shop around for creative endeavors they may not have thought possible.”
Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement.  It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.  Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers.  They are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community.
The original Maker Faire event was held in San Mateo, CA and in 2017 celebrated its twelfth annual show with some 1200 makers and 125,000 people in attendance.  World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in six years to 900+ makers and 95,000 attendees. Forty larger scale Maker Faires occur in cities around the world—Berlin, Paris, Rome, Tokyo, and Shenzhen to name a few—and over 170 community-driven, independently organized Mini Maker Faires are now being produced in the United States and 40 other countries around the world.
“Boston has so many world-class educational institutions and a wide breadth of maker spaces—it's an ideal context for a Maker Faire," said Sabrina Merlo, Maker Media Program Director.  “We are delighted to have Boston Children’s Museum as a partner, and are excited this year to see the Faire grow and turn out and celebrate more of the talented and diverse Boston maker community.” 
The Boston Mini Maker Faire is being led by Boston Children's Museum and an advisory board of leaders from local Maker organizations, including Artisan’s Asylum, The Eliot School, Roxbury Innovation Center, Boston Makers, Einstein’s Workshop, Olin College, Artists for Humanity, and NuVu Studio. Last year’s Faire in Boston was the city’s first, with 80 makers and thousands of visitors attending. The 2017 edition will build on that success and will host more makers and welcome even more visitors.
Admission to the Mini Maker Faire will be $20 per person, which includes indoor and outdoor activities. The cost to Museum members is $10. Given the nature of this special event, typical Museum discounts will not apply. Please also note that not all indoor Museum exhibits will be open during the event.  To purchase tickets in advance for the Mini Maker Faire http://bit.ly/2uP0tcs
Boston Mini Maker Faire is independently organized by Boston Children’s Museum and operated under license from Maker Media, Inc. 
For additional information visit http://boston.makerfaire.com/ and BostonChildrensMuseum.org

Guggenheim Museum Schedule of Exhibitions Through 2019






The information below is subject to change. Please contact the Press Office to confirm exhibition dates prior to publication.

FINAL WEEKS

ON VIEW

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

October 6–January 7, 2018


A fresh interpretative survey of Chinese experimental art framed by the geopolitical dynamics resulting from the end of the Cold War, the spread of globalization, and the rise of China. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, the largest exhibition of its kind ever in North America, looks at a bold contemporary art movement that anticipated, chronicled, and agitated for the sweeping social transformation that has brought China to the center of the global conversation. With a concentration on the conceptualist art practices of two generations of artists, this exhibition examines how Chinese artists have been both agents and skeptics of China’s emergence as a global presence and places their experiments firmly in an international art-historical context. Occupying the Guggenheim’s rotunda and two Tower Galleries, Art and China after 1989 highlights the artistic achievements of 71 artists and collectives, and features nearly 150 iconic and lesser-known works on loan from private and public collections across Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the United States. Divided into six chronological and thematic sections, the exhibition showcases works in experimental mediums including film and video, ink, installation, and Land art, as well as painting, sculpture, photography, performance, and socially engaged participatory art and activism. Archival materials documenting and contextualizing key moments and movements in this contested history are also interwoven throughout the exhibition. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World is organized by Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art, and Senior Advisor, Global Arts, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and guest cocurators Philip Tinari, Director of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, and Hou Hanru, Artistic Director of MAXXI, National Museum of 21st Century Arts, Rome. Xiaorui Zhu-Nowell, Research Associate and Curatorial Assistant, Asian Art, and Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, Guggenheim Museum, have provided organizational support. Archival research has been developed in collaboration with Asia Art Archives, Hong Kong. The curators are working with an international advisory committee that has met under the auspices of the China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, and the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing.
The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its generous support, with special thanks to Cochairs Thomas and Lynn Ou and Liam Wee Tay and Cindy Chua-Tay, Trustee, as well as Karen Lo, Sophia Ma, Jane Yong, Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, Yasko Tashiro Porté and Thierry Porté, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang, Jane Q. Zhao, and those who wish to remain anonymous. Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation. Funding is also provided by the W.L.S. Spencer Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, The Nancy Foss Heath and Richard B. Heath Educational, Cultural and Environmental Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Josef Albers in Mexico

November 3, 2017–February 18, 2018


On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Josef Albers (1888–1976) encountered the magnificent architecture of ancient Mesoamerica. He later remarked in a letter to Vasily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, “Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art.” With his wife, artist Anni Albers (1899–1994), Josef Albers made nearly a dozen trips to Latin America from 1935 through 1967, touring numerous archeological sites and monuments, especially in Mexico and Peru. He took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, many of which he later assembled, printed at various scales, into groups on 8-by-10 inch sheets. Albers’s innovative approach to photography remains an underappreciated aspect of his career. This exhibition brings together his photographs and photo collages from the Guggenheim’s collection and various lenders. These works, many of which have never been exhibited publicly, suggest a nuanced relationship between the forms and motifs of pre-Columbian monuments and the artist’s iconic abstract canvases. Albers’s experiences in Mexico offer an essential context for understanding his paintings and prints, particularly from his Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, examples of which are featured in this show. Josef Albers in Mexico is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections.
Major support for Josef Albers in Mexico is provided by the LLWW Foundation. Funding is also provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, David Zwirner, New York/London, and Louisa Stude Sarofim. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported by Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund.

Danh Vo

February 9–May 9, 2018


The first comprehensive survey in the United States of work by Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Ria, Vietnam) will fill the ramps of the Guggenheim’s rotunda, offering an illuminating overview of Vo’s production from the past 15 years, including a number of new projects created on the occasion of the exhibition. Vo’s installations dissect the power structures, cultural forces, and private desires that shape our experience of the world. His work addresses themes of religion, colonialism, capitalism, and artistic authorship, but refracts these sweeping subjects through intimate personal narratives—what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Each project grows out of a period of intense research in which historical study, fortuitous encounters, and personal relationships are woven into psychologically potent tableaux. Subjected to Vo’s vivid processes of deconstruction and recombination, found objects become registers of latent histories and sociopolitical fissures, frequently charged by knowledge of their former ownership or their status as historical bystanders. Whether presenting the intimate possessions of his family members, a series of thank-you notes from Henry Kissinger, or the chandeliers that glittered above the signing of the treaty that ended the Vietnam War, Vo subtly excavates the internal contradictions and veiled tensions embedded in his material. Ranging the full spectrum of the artist’s oeuvre—from early conceptual works such as The Marriage Project (2003–05), in which he married and divorced acquaintances in order to add their surnames to his own, to his recent sculptural hybrids of classical and Christian statuary—the exhibition will interweave installations, photographs, and works on paper from various points in his career to amplify their thematic resonances. This exhibition is organized by Katherine Brinson, Daskalopoulos Curator, Contemporary Art, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator.
Funding for this exhibition is provided by the Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne. Additional support is provided by the the Obel Family Foundation, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, and the Danish Arts Foundation. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support. The catalogue for this exhibition is supported by the New Carlsberg Foundation.

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative
Third and final commission and exhibition

May 4–October 21, 2018


The third and final exhibition of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative will present new commissions by artists born in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macao. Launched in 2013, the initiative engages artists, scholars, and curators from around the world to bring intersecting regional and global conversations and contemporary practices to the fore. Through the selection of key artists, practices, and issues arising from across Greater China, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative strengthens the Guggenheim’s collegial network among the Chinese art community and expands the discourse and investigation of contemporary art today. The first exhibition of the initiative, Wang Jianwei: Time Temple (2014–15), featured a sculptural installation, paintings, a film, and a performance by Wang Jianwei, one of China’s leading conceptual artists. The most recent presentation, Tales of Our Time(2016–17), was a group exhibition that included a robot-operated installation of monumental scale, a public tea gathering in an indoor garden setting, and immersive video works to explore and challenge the notion of place. All works created through the initiative will form The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection at the Guggenheim. The exhibition is organized by Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art, and Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation. Kyung An, Assistant Curator, Asian Art, provides curatorial support.
This exhibition is made possible by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Giacometti

June 8–September 16, 2018


This comprehensive exhibition features more than 175 sculptures, paintings, and drawings by the Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti (1901–1966), in the first major museum presentation of the artist’s work in the United States in fifteen years. In 1955, more than 60 years ago, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum organized the first-ever museum presentation of Giacometti’s work in its former temporary quarters on New York’s Fifth Avenue and brought key works into its collection. A posthumous retrospective followed in the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed rotunda in 1974. The upcoming exhibition, co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and The Fondation Alberto and Annette Giacometti, examines anew this preeminent modernist who may be best known for his distinctive figurative sculptures that emerged after the trauma and anguish of World War II, including a series of elongated standing women, striding men, and expressive busts. Yet Giacometti’s rich career—spent largely working and living in France—spans several decades and various mediums, and his early production reveals his engagement with Cubism and Surrealism as well as African, Oceanic, and Cycladic art. Giacometti’s paintings and drawings, moreover, reflect his incessant investigations of the human body in sculpture, as he strove to capture the essence of humanity. A number of pocket-sized figures and heads begun immediately before the war years, for example, explore spatial concerns such as perspective and distance that became paramount to his work. Giacometti’s studio practice will likewise be a particular focus of the exhibition, examined through the inclusion of rarely exhibited plaster sculptures, in addition to ephemera and historical photographs documenting his relationship with the Guggenheim and with New York. Giacometti is curated by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Modern Art and Provenance, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Catherine Grenier, Director, The Fondation Giacometti.
This exhibition is made possible by Lavazza. The Leadership Committee for this exhibition is gratefully acknowledged for its support.

Hilma af Klint

October 19, 2018–February 3, 2019


In fall 2018, the Guggenheim Museum will present the first major solo exhibition in the United States of the work of pioneering artist Hilma af Klint (1862–1944), a long under-recognized innovator of abstract art. Af Klint had begun producing nonobjective paintings by 1906, significantly before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others widely considered trailblazers of the movement to free artwork of representational content. The bold color palettes and expansive formats af Klint frequently used were also like little else that had been seen before. Despite her prescience, af Klint was not well known during her lifetime or the decades following her death. Though she showed her portraits and landscapes, which were rendered in a deft academic style, she produced her more groundbreaking works as part of her spiritual practice. She hoped to install many of them in a spiral-shaped temple, but the building never came to fruition, and the works remained largely unseen. In her turn to abstraction, af Klint engaged many of the same cultural currents that came to inform the work of her better-known peers, including theosophy and anthroposophy, spiritualism, and major scientific discoveries of the period, such as evolution and atomic theory. When af Klint died in 1944, she stipulated that her work not be shown for another 20 years; she believed the world was not yet ready to understand her radically forward-looking compositions. Only over the past three decades have her paintings and works on paper begun to gain widespread attention. This presentation, organized by Tracey Bashkoff, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions, will offer the opportunity to experience af Klint’s work in depth and gain insight into her unique artistic practice and singular historic achievements. In conjunction with the exhibition, the museum will feature a presentation of work by other artists highlighting resonances with af Klint’s output and practice.

Fernand Léger: The Last Decades

June–September 2019


This exhibition will present a renewed examination of this French artist’s late career, when his observations of city dwellers and the human form in action inspired a significant body of work organized by theme. Léger was among the few French artists of his generation to visit the United States. He first traveled to New York and Chicago in 1931, returned to attend his retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1935, and, in 1938, spent several months here when he was commissioned by Nelson Rockefeller to decorate his apartment and several homes designed by architect Wallace K. Harrison. With the advent of WWII, Léger chose to wait out his exile in the United States. He taught and lectured across the country, exploring the diversity of its people and achievements. These observations yielded an entirely new approach to his painting, beginning in 1940, which marked his obsession with volume and monumentality and greater transparency of color. During his time in America, his subject matter encompassed a rich series of motifs in such works as Divers, Cyclists, Acrobats and Musicians and Country Outings. Returning to France in late 1945, Léger continued to record contemporary life in his Builders series and in chronicling the leisure activities of the working class, culminating in his masterpiece, the mural-sized Great Parade (1954), which was painted the year before the artist’s death and is a hallmark of the Guggenheim’s collection. Motivated in part by his political engagement with social issues and an unwavering humanist support of the travails of the common man, Léger stands as a defining force in modern art. Fernand Léger: The Last Decades is organized by Susan Davidson, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions.

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao 20th Anniversary


This year, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao celebrates its milestone 20th Anniversary as a catalyst for art and culture in Spain’s Basque Country. In the two decades since its opening, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has staged more than 160 exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, and it today welcomes over 1 million visitors annually. Special events around the anniversary include Reflections, a large-scale video projection on the iconic building’s facade, hosted on the evenings of October 11–14. The Guggenheim Museum in New York joins the celebration with new blog and video content on guggenheim.org and photos from anniversary celebrations shared on social media channels. For more information and details on events and exhibitions in Bilbao, visit xx.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en.
For the full schedule of exhibitions through 2018 at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, please visit https://www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/exhibitions/.

Peggy Guggenheim Collection


For the full schedule of exhibitions through 2018 at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, please visit http://www.guggenheim-venice.it/inglese/exhibitions/mostre.php

VISITOR INFORMATION


Admission: Adults $25, students/seniors (65+) $18, members and children under 12 free. Available with admission or by download to personal devices, the Guggenheim’s free app offers an enhanced visitor experience. The app features content on special exhibitions, access to more than 1,600 works in the Guggenheim’s permanent collection, and information about the museum’s landmark building. Verbal imaging guides for select exhibitions are also included for visitors who are blind or have low vision. The Guggenheim app is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.
Museum Hours: Sun–Wed 10 am–5:45 pm, Tues 10 am–9 pm from June 20 to Aug 29, Fri 10 am–5:45 pm, Sat 10 am–7:45 pm, closed Thurs. On Saturdays, beginning at 5:45 pm, the museum hosts Pay What You Wish. For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online at: guggenheim.org

School of Chinese Studies

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Gallery Exhibitions

Arts & Culture Programs








Spotlight: 
Announcing Fall at China Institute

There is no better time to learn than this Fall at China Institute. We've broadened our Kids & Teens class offerings to now include Mandarin Munchkins for children 18 months to 2.5 years. We've added a Study Hall for students who are seeking help with their Chinese lessons and homework. And our Fall after-school program is as robust as ever, offering Chinese Language classes at all levels of proficiency. Plus, it's not too soon to start prepping for AP & SAT exams.

For Adult life-long learners, Classical Chinese IV: A Rare Linguistic Gem, taught by Ben Wang, China Institute Senior Lecturer, offers an inspiring and joyful language-study experience that acquaints students with the heights of Chinese culture. Reading Modern Chinese Literature is a 'must' course for any advanced student seeking to learn through prose about China's modern era. For those that are college bound or interested in pursuing a career utilizing their Mandarin, we also offer a new HSK Test Prep program.

Not ready for Fall? August still has lots going on at China Institute. Our Immersive Summer Day Camp for Kids and Teens offers your child the opportunity to learn, play and have fun! Stay cool and see a Film! Our Center for Arts & Culture is co-presenting some great Chinese Films as part of Lincoln Center's Asian American International Film Festival.

And for those art, culture and history lovers, come experience the Han Dynasty right here in Lower Manhattan! Only a handful (9!) extraordinary head to toe jade suits that promised immortality to the Chinese royals and dignitaries have ever been excavated complete, and the most spectacular one is on view at China Institute Gallery. Be sure to visit Dreams of the Kings: A Jade Suit for Eternity, Treasures of the Han Dynasty from Xuzhou. to see for yourself how the imperials treated death as life, and witness the most magnificent gold thread sewn jade burial suit ever excavated.




Fall Classes Registration Open Now!

Receive up to $50 off tuition byAugust 15! Fall Semester StartsSeptember 25









New! Reading Modern Chinese Literature

Thursdays

September 28 - December 7
6:30-8:30PM


Designed for advanced readers, this course will introduce the most influential authors and their works in the history of modern Chinese literature. 



Instructor: Steve Zhang, Senior Instructor of Language & Literature at China Institute  





Fall Special Course: Classical Chinese IV: A Rare Linguistic Gem

















































Tuesdays 





September 26 - November 28





6:30-8:30PM







Marked by its succinctness and expressiveness, classical Chinese manifests fully the unique characteristic of the visceral language, which is an uncanny blending of music and painting.



Instructor: Ben Wang, Senior Lecturer of Language & Humanities at China Institute







Private Tutoring





The Private Tutoring Program was established to meet students' specific language needs. Classes are offered both in-person or online, and every lesson is customized to fulfill an individual's language goals across multiple work streams. Our instructors are all native speakers with excellent credentials. 




HSK Preparation


Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK), an international standardized test of Chinese language proficiency, assesses non-native Chinese speakers' abilities in using the Chinese language in their daily, academic and professional lives. With experienced instructors, effective curriculum and rich resources, we offer quality private tutoring in HSK test preparation to help you achieve the highest score possible!  




Crash Course for Corporate Executives - Chinese Culture & Business Etiquette



Designed for corporate professionals doing business with the Chinese, this crash course provides executives with a business focused overview of Chinese culture and language and will help participants interact more confidently, build rapport and strengthen relationships with potential business partners.


Summer Day Camp - 


Last chance to enroll before session III

Enroll for our third session fromAugust 7 - August 18 *Fridays are field trip days and meet from 9am-12pm


Make your child's summer a fun-filled experience by enrolling in the Children's Summer Day Camp at China Institute.








Chinese Language - Fall 2017 




Fall 2017 Classes begin the week ofSeptember 11th, 2017. We are accepting new students for the fall semester ages 2-17 and for all proficiency levels! 














Early bird discount! 
Sign up before August 14th to get the $50 registration fee waived. 5% discount for siblings.








Private Tutoring

Flexible Schedule, 


Location & Times

Private tutoring through China Institute offers a flexible alternative to regular language classes.

SAT & AP PREP
Flexible Schedule, 

Location & Times
China Institute delivers personally tailored Mandarin Chinese SAT & AP Prep lessons. 
educators 


Case Studies for Better Teaching
October 1, 7, 14; December 3, 2017
10:00AM-3:30PM




Case Studies for Better Teaching (CSBT), a short course designed and delivered by Dr. Wei-ling Wu, is intended to examine the question through case studies that focus on implementation and practice. The participants will discuss and analyze various lesson plans, activities, tasks, projects, and even worksheets in light of the ACTFL Standards and the ACTFL Core Practices to see what works and what needs improvement.


Immigration in a Changing World: Identity, Citizenship, and Belo
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 “珍陶萃美” —清宫陳設钧瓷賞析

University Teaching Gallery, Harvard Art Museums
The Harvard Art Museums hold the largest and finest collection in the West of a rare and strikingly beautiful type of ceramic ware used in the private quarters of the Forbidden City, the Chinese imperial palace in Beijing. These numbered Jun wares—so named because each is marked on its base with a single Chinese numeral—have long been admired for their fine potting, distinctive shapes, and radiant purple and blue glazes. Opinions on these vessels’ dates of origin vary widely, and given the scarcity of numbered Jun in most museum collections, a comprehensive study of this unusual ware has never been undertaken outside the imperial collections in China and Taiwan.
Drawn entirely from the museums’ permanent collections, this exhibition introduces the typology, technical characteristics, collecting history, and controversies surrounding numbered Jun ware. It features approximately half of the museums’ 60 numbered Jun, all of which were given to Harvard in 1942 by Boston-area collectors Ernest B. Dane (Harvard College Class of 1892) and his wife Helen Pratt Dane. This exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the Danes’ extraordinary gift of nearly 300 Chinese ceramics and later jades. It is also the first focused exhibition of their unique collection of palace Jun ware since it came to Harvard.
The exhibition is complemented by an online resource that provides further contextualization of Harvard’s entire numbered Jun collection. The Numbered Jun Ware Special Collection introduces this remarkable ceramic ware and explores its many complexities through descriptive summaries of its typology, technical characteristics, controversies, and collecting history, accompanied by a selection of representative images.
Curated by Melissa A. Moy, the Alan J. Dworsky Associate Curator of Chinese Art at the Harvard Art Museums.
The exhibition and online special collections feature are funded in part by the Gregory and Maria Henderson Fund and by generous support from Terry and William Carey.
Related Programming
Information about related events, including gallery talks in English and in Mandarin Chinese, can be found on our calendar.
Index magazine

Stories related to the exhibition can be found in the museums’ Index magazine. Click on the “exhibition” tag at magazine.harvardartmuseums.org.







Gallery Talk (in Mandarin Chinese): Adorning the Inner Court: Jun Ware for the Chinese Palace


中文導覽: “珍陶萃美” —清宫陳設钧瓷賞析 2017年7月13日 主講: 楊妍 館員、研究員 哈佛大學藝術博物館5月20日至8月13日舉辦主題展覽Adorning the Inner Court: Jun Ware for the Chinese Palace。圍繞館藏的鈞瓷精品,討論清宮陳設類鈞瓷的工藝特點、製作方法及其歷史和藝術欣賞價值。歡迎參觀! 導覽憑門票參加。名額限於15人。請於導覽開始前十分鐘在售票處領取,並於售票處旁的電子顯示屏前集合。 Yan Yang, curatorial assistant for the collection in the Division of Asian and Mediterranean Art, will give today’s gallery talk. Adorning the Inner Court...
  • Hours: 12:30pm - 1:00pm
  • Date: July 13, 2017





Works & Process, the Performing-Arts Series at the Guggenheim, Announces Fall 2017 Season



Highlights:

  • Works & Process Rotunda Project commission featuring American Ballet Theatre principal Daniil Simkin with costumes by Dior
  • A new commission featuring Ryan McNamara and John Zorn
  • A new commission by Nico Muhly inspired by the oldest song in the world
  • Previews of new operas by John Adams and Peter Sellars, and Thomas Adès and Tom Cairns
  • Performance and discussion celebrating the 50th anniversary of  Tanaquil Le Clercq’s The Ballet Cook Book with a dinner featuring recipes from the book.
  • Peter & The Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi
(NEW YORK, NY – July 31, 2017)—Works & Process at the Guggenheim is pleased to announce its fall 2017 season and opens the season with a commissioned performance made in and for the museum rotunda. Since 1984 the performing-arts series has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to leading creators and performers. Each intimate, 80-minute performance combines artistic creation with stimulating conversation, and takes place in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed, 285-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. The New York Times describes Works & Process as “a popular series devoted to shedding light on the creative process.” Additional information is available at worksandprocess.org.
Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Florence Gould Foundation, The Christian Humann Foundation, Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Caroline M. Sharp, and Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

FALL 2017 SEASON SCHEDULE

WORKS & PROCESS ROTUNDA PROJECT

Falls the Shadow by Daniil Simkin

Monday and Tuesday, September 4 and 5, 8 and 9:30 pm
Commissioned by Works & Process and created by American Ballet Theatre (ABT) Principal Dancer Daniil Simkin, Falls the Shadow is a new production featuring Simkin, ABT soloist Cassandra Trenary, Ana Lopez from Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, and dancer Brett Conway; choreography by Alejandro Cerrudo; projection design by Dmitrij Simkin; and costume design by Dior. The performers’ movements will be captured by motion sensors, generating 3-D mapped visuals that will be projected onto the rotunda to create an immersive experience that merges technology, music, visual art, fashion, and dance. This 30-minute performance will be viewed from the ramps and requires audience members to stand for the duration of the program.
Leadership support for Works & Process Rotunda Projects provided by Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and Caroline M. Sharp.
Daniil Simkin: Falls the Shadow lead support provided by Kerry Clayton and Paige Royer; Howard Paley; and Michèle and Steven Pesner.
WorldStage is the technology partner for Danill Simkin: Falls the Shadow.

Nico Muhly and the Countertenor

Sunday, September 17, 7:30 pm
Composer Nico Muhly discusses his music for countertenor. A selection of these works will be performed alongside a preview of a new Works & Process commission. Inspired by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World’s interpretation of the oldest song in the world, the commission is an extension of Lenka Clayton and Jon Rubin’s project . . . circle through New York, part of the Guggenheim Social Practice initiative.

The Principles of Uncertainty by John Heginbotham and Maira Kalman

Monday, September 18, 7:30 pm
Choreographer John Heginbotham and author/illustrator Maira Kalman discuss their newest collaboration featuring imaginative production design and whimsical dance theater inspired by Kalman’s written work and visual art. Following the world premiere at Jacob’s Pillow Dance and before the New York premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Dance Heginbotham and members of The Knights orchestra will perform highlights set to a score by the orchestra’s artistic director Colin Jacobsen.

San Francisco Opera: Girls of the Golden West by John Adams and Peter Sellars

Thursday and Friday, September 21 and 22, 7:30 pm
Composer John Adams and librettist/director Peter Sellars discuss their newest collaboration with San Francisco Opera General Director Matthew Shilvock. Sourced from historical writings about California’s Gold Rush, the opera explores the dramatic and brutal stories of remarkable characters who are hoping to strike it rich and are quickly caught up in the optimism, greed, and prejudices of a rapidly changing world. Highlights are performed prior to the world premiere in San Francisco.

Lincoln Center Theater: JUNK by Ayad Akhtar

Saturday, September 23, 7:30 pm
Pulitzer Prize–winning author Ayad Akhtar and Tony Award–winning director Doug Hughes discuss Akhtar’s newest play before its New York premiere. Cast members perform highlights from the financial thriller, set in the hotbed of the 1980s, about Robert Merkin, the genius behind an upstart investment firm hell-bent on changing all the rules. Merkin sets in motion a financial civil war, pitting magnates against workers, lawyers against journalists, and ultimately, everyone against themselves.

The Living Word Project: |peh-LO-tah| by Marc Bamuthi Joseph

Sunday, October 1, 7:30 pm
In conjunction with Joseph’s project moving and passing, part of the Guggenheim Social Practice initiative, highlights from /peh-LO-tah/ will be performed prior to opening at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Directed by Michael John Garcés, choreographed by Stacey Printz, and with music by Tommy Shepard, the work is a “futbol-framed freedom suite” inspired by Joseph’s first-generation American experience, and it explores the intersection of global economics, crossborder fan culture, and the politics of joy. Joseph will discuss the work with producer Cathy Zimmerman.

American Ballet Theatre Season Preview

Sunday and Monday, October 8 and 9, 7:30 pm
For over 75 years, ABT has been home to the most important figures in classical ballet. Join the company for an evening of discussion and dance as highlights of new commissions from the fall 2017 season are performed prior to their premieres.

The Metropolitan Opera: The Exterminating Angel

Music by Thomas Adès, libretto by Tom Cairns

Monday, October 16, 7:30 pm
Hailed by the New York Times at its 2016 Salzburg Festival premiere as “inventive and audacious. . . . a major event,” Thomas Adès’s The Exterminating Angel, inspired by the classic Luis Buñuel film of the same name, is a surreal fantasy about a dinner party that guests cannot escape. Prior to the American premiere, Met Opera general manager Peter Gelb discusses the opera with Adès, and singers perform highlights.

Open Rehearsal: Steve Reich and Ensemble Signal

Tuesday, October 17, 7:30 pm
Go into the rehearsal studio with conductor Brad Lubman and Ensemble Signal as they prepare for their Carnegie Hall concert featuring music by Steve Reich. Preview the New York premiere of Runner and hear Pulse in raw form, without technical equipment or sound reinforcement. Between performances, Reich and Lubman discuss the works.

NEW COMMISSION

Ryan McNamara and John Zorn

Sunday and Monday, October 22 and 23, 7:30 pm
See the premiere of a Works & Process commission for the unique architecture of the Guggenheim’s Peter B. Lewis Theater. Collaborating with a community of dancers and artists with whom he has worked for years, Ryan McNamara will create a performance set to Commedia dell’arte by composer John Zorn.

Tanaquil Le Clercq’s The Ballet Cook Book: A 50th Anniversary Celebration

Sunday and Monday, November 5 and 6, 7:30 pm
In 1967 ballerina Tanaquil Le Clercq published The Ballet Cook Book, her masterful compendium of ballet history, food stories, and recipes from over 90 leading dancers and choreographers of the day, including George Balanchine, Jacques d’Amboise, Melissa Hayden, and Allegra Kent. Celebrating the book’s 50th anniversary, dancers from New York City Ballet perform excerpts from roles originated by Ballet Cook Book contributors, and dance legends Jacques d’Amboise and Allegra Kent join food scholar Meryl Rosofsky and dancers Jared Angle and Adrian Danchig-Waring in a discussion of Le Clercq’s artistic and culinary legacy.
In conjunction with this program, select dishes from The Ballet Cook Book will be served at The Wright restaurant. For reservations call 212 427 5690 or visit opentable.com.

The Sarasota Ballet: Classical and New Voices

Sunday, November 19, 3 and 7:30 pm
American Ballet Theatre Principal Dancer and choreographer Marcelo Gomes, invited by director Iain Webb and executive director Joseph Volpe, recently performed with The Sarasota Ballet in Sir Frederick Ashton’s rarely seen The Two Pigeons. After working with Gomes, Webb commissioned a new choreographic work from him. Exploring classical and new voices, Gomes performs highlights from The Two Pigeons and company dancers perform excerpts from the new commission prior to the premiere in Sarasota. With Webb, Gomes shares insight into his creative process during the development of this new work.

Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi

December 2, 3, 9, and 10, 2:30 and 4 pm
December 8, 6:30 pm
Isaac Mizrahi narrates Sergei Prokofiev’s charming children’s classic as Brad Lubman conducts Ensemble Signal and a cast performs choreography by John Heginbotham, bringing the 30-minute story to life for the young and young at heart.
For children 5 and up. Enter via the ramp at 88th St and 5th Ave.
FRONT ROW TICKETING: $100, $95 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

NEW COMMISSION

Holiday Concert

Sunday and Monday, December 17 and 18, 7 pm
Celebrate the season with the joyous sounds of holiday music and a new Works & Process commission by composer Nico Muhly in the museum’s iconic rotunda. George Steel conducts the Vox Vocal Ensemble in what has become a revered annual tradition.
FLOOR SEATING: $40, $35 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members
RAMP STANDING: $20, $15 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

Location

Peter B. Lewis Theater (unless otherwise noted)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street
Subway: 4, 5, 6 train to 86th Street
Bus: M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus on Madison or Fifth Avenue

Tickets

$40, $35 members (unless otherwise noted)
$10 student rush tickets available one hour prior to each performance if space allows
(for students under 25 with valid ID).
Priority ticket access and preferred seat selection starts July 31, 2017, for Friends of Works & Process or Guggenheim members Associate level and above.
Season tickets will be on sale August 7. 2017.
For the box office call 212 423 3575, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm.
For more information, call 212 758 0024 or 212 423 3587, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm, or visit worksandprocess.org.

guggenheim.org/social
#WorksandProcess

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Appoints Karole P.B. Vail to Lead the Peggy Guggenheim Collection

(NEW YORK AND VENICE – June 8, 2017) –– Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced the appointment of Guggenheim curator Karole P.B. Vail as Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and Foundation Director for Italy. A member of the Guggenheim’s curatorial staff since 1997 and a granddaughter of Peggy Guggenheim, Ms. Vail becomes only the second director in the history of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, succeeding Philip Rylands, who led the museum for 37 years and will become Director Emeritus. Ms. Vail will assume her duties in Venice this month, reporting to Richard Armstrong.
Ms. Vail’s most recent exhibition for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York was the highly regarded retrospective Moholy-Nagy: Future Present (2016), which she organized in collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She is currently co-organizing the retrospective Alberto Giacometti, to be presented at the Guggenheim in New York in 2018.
Richard Armstrong said, “Having worked closely with Karole Vail for almost a decade, I have the deepest respect for her scholarship, curatorial insight, unfailingly sound judgment, and collegial management style. I have the utmost confidence in her ability to lead the Peggy Guggenheim Collection into the future, and know that her personal ties to the institution and roots in Italy and Europe will add an unmatched depth and nuance to her work.”
William L. Mack, Chairman of the Guggenheim Board of Trustees, said, “Karole Vail assumes leadership at an auspicious moment, when the Peggy Guggenheim Collection is enjoying record attendance and a strong exhibition program, and recently completed a successful capital campaign to support key renovation projects at the Palazzo. Karole’s appointment begins a special and exciting new chapter in the museum’s history.”
Karole Vail said, “I have known and loved Peggy’s collection, and the palazzo and garden that are its home, since I was a child. Now it is my privilege and honor to lead this exceptional institution, carrying forward Peggy’s vision and ensuring that it remains a vital part of today’s culture, as she would have wanted it to be. I embark on this role with a sense of great responsibility, an eye to the future and a deep appreciation for Peggy’s extraordinary accomplishments.”
About Karole P.B. Vail
Karole P.B. Vail, a curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and a member of its curatorial staff since 1997, will assume her duties as Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection and Foundation Director for Italy in Venice in June 2017.
Among the exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum for which she has served as curator or co-curator, in addition to Moholy-Nagy: Future Present and Alberto Giacometti, are Peggy Guggenheim: A Centennial Celebration (1998); Art of Tomorrow: Hilla Rebay and Solomon R. Guggenheim (2005-06); and From Berlin to New York: Karl Nierendorf and the Guggenheim (2008).
Ms. Vail has also been a collaborator and coordinator for Surrealism: Two Private Eyes, The Nesuhi Ertegun and Daniel Filipacchi Collections (1999); Armani (2000); Boccioni’s Materia: A Futurist Masterpiece and the Avant-Garde in Milan and Paris (2004); Robert Mapplethorpe and the Classical Tradition: Photographs and Mannerist Prints (2004); Lucio Fontana: Venice/New York (2006); Solomon’s Gift: The Foundation Collection of the Guggenheim, 1937-1949 (2007); Richard Pousette-Dart (2008); Kandinsky (2009), in conjunction with which she also organized the photography exhibition Kandinsky and Gabriele Münter in the Guggenheim’s Sackler Center for Education; Picasso Black and White (2013); and Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Infinite Possibility, Mirror Works and Drawings 1974-2014 (2014-15).
Among the many publications that Ms. Vail has written, co-written or edited are The Museum of Non-Objective Painting: Hilla Rebay and the Origins of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, conceived of by Ms. Vail and published in 2009 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum; Moholy-Nagy: Future Present, which received an Honorable Mention in the 2017 Awards for Excellence of the Association of Art Museum Curators; Art of Tomorrow: Hilla Rebay and Solomon R. Guggenheim; and Peggy Guggenheim: A Celebration. Ms. Vail has also contributed texts and entries to catalogues such as Kandinsky, Armani and Surrealism: Two Private Eyes, The Nesuhi Ertegun and Daniel Filipacchi Collections.
She is a co-founder and co-director of Non-Objectif Sud, a not-for-profit artist residency and exhibition program in the south of France.
Prior to joining the Guggenheim, Ms. Vail served as an archivist and researcher at Centro Di in Florence, Italy, a documentation center and publishing house specializing in art history, architecture and decorative arts, and as an assistant curator on independent projects. Educated in the U.K., she received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Durham University and a Diploma in Art History from the New Academy for Art Studies in London.

Guggenheim Celebrates 150th Birthday of Frank Lloyd Wright on Thursday, June 8 with Special Open Hours, On-Site Activities, and $1.50 Admission

Additional programs throughout June will honor the legacy of Wright, architect of the iconic Guggenheim Museum


Event: Frank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration
Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Date: June 8, 10 am–5:45 pm
Website: www.guggenheim.org/flw150
(NEW YORK, NY—May 3, 2017)—Celebrate the 150th birthday of Frank Lloyd Wright through a series of activities at the architect’s masterwork: the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
The celebration kicks off Thursday, June 8 with a special open day (10 am to 5:45 pm) and a reduced admission fee of $1.50 in honor of Wright’s 150th birthday. The Guggenheim’s newly renovated Cafe 3 will feature large-scale, rarely seen photographs of the museum during its construction and will add a special birthday cupcake to the day’s menu. An actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright will be on-site engaging with visitors between 10 am and 1 pm.
Additional activities will be offered during the month of June including architecture-specific tours of the museum as part of the Art in the Round program, sketch workshops such as Drawing the Guggenheim, and a variety of family programs. The Guggenheim Store will also feature new Wright-related merchandise, and the museum’s website will highlight new content about Wright.
To view a full schedule of Frank Lloyd Wright-related events at the Guggenheim this June, visit guggenheim.org/flw150.

JUNE 8 ACTIVITIES


10:30 am and 11 am: Fifteen-minute overview of the design and construction of the Guggenheim Museum in Cafe 3, led by an actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright
11:30 am–12:30 pm: Actor-historian portraying Frank Lloyd Wright greets museum visitors at the Fifth Avenue entrance
12-1 pm: Architectural tour of the museum led by Ashley Mendelsohn, Curatorial Assistant, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1 pm: Birthday cake and candles in Cafe 3
Interview, photo, and b-roll opportunities available.

ABOUT THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION


Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
GUGGENHEIM LATIN AMERICAN CIRCLE PRESENTS PERFORMANCES ON MAY 5 First Public Presentation in the United States of Three Recently Acquired Artworks by OPAVIVIRÁ!, Amalia Pica, and Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa

 (NEW YORK, NY – April 25, 2017) –– On Friday, May 5, the Guggenheim Museum introduces three recently acquired artworks performed for the first time in the United States by Rio de Janeiro-based collective OPAVIVARÁ!, Amalia Pica (b. 1978, Neuquén, Argentina), and Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa (b.1978, Guatemala City). The evening marks the first public event organized by the museum’s recently formed Latin American Circle, a group of art patrons and collectors dedicated to raising awareness and support for museum public programs, acquisitions, and exhibitions, with a focus on contemporary Latin American art. Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performance is organized by curator Pablo León de la Barra with Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator. Furthering its mission of collecting, preserving, and interpreting the art of our time in a global context, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation has presented several exhibitions of Latin American art in recent years, including Doris Salcedo (2015) and Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms (2012–13), and produced Sanatorium by Pedro Reyes (2012). Through the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, a distinctive program that creates direct access to contemporary art and education on a global scale via in-depth collaboration with artists, curators, and cultural organizations from three regions including Latin America, the Guggenheim increased its holdings of Latin American art by twenty percent and appointed Pablo León de la Barra as Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Latin America. Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today (2014–16), presented in New York, Mexico City, and London as part of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Initiative, featured more than fifty new works added to the collection. Since the 1960s, the Guggenheim Museum has presented numerous performances in the rotunda by artists including Marina Abramović, Philip Glass, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Pierre Huyghe, Joan Jonas, Meredith Monk, and John Zorn as well as performance-based exhibitions and installations by Matthew Barney and Tino Sehgal. Recognizing performance and time-based media as an essential aspect of art practice, and the issues it raises—regarding duration and ephemerality, the role of the document and the function of memory, the value of labor and the significance of personal interaction— the Guggenheim remains committed to the process of acquiring, maintaining and displaying ephemeral, durational works of art. Latin American Circle Presents: An Evening of Performance at the Guggenheim May 5, 7–9 pm On May 5, three performance works will be presented in the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda. Amalia Pica’s Asamble (2015) takes the form of a procession involving more than two dozen participants—the circular form of which evokes a universal emblem of assembly—and explores the challenges of democratic communication. Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa’s A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala (Breve Historia de la Arquitectura en Guatemala, 2010) is a dance performed in costumes modeled after iconic Mesoamerican building typologies—a Mayan pyramid, a colonial church, a modernist block—and examines the tendency of architecture to memorialize regimes of power and exploitation. In Kitchen Drumming (Batuque na cozinha, 2013/17) by OPAVIVARÁ!, basic kitchen tools mounted to the body become percussive instruments in a performance that fuses celebration and protest by evoking carnival parades, marching bands, and anti-government demonstrations. A reception and private view of the current exhibitions Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim and The Hugo Boss Prize 2016: Anicka Yi, Life is Cheap will follow. Tickets are $15, $10 for members, and $8 for students and can be purchased by calling the Box Office at 212 423 3587 or visiting guggenheim.org/publicprograms. Support for the performance is provided by Guggenheim Latin American Circle members Ximena Caminos and Alan Faena, Catherine Petitgas, and Camila Sol de Pool. About the Artists Founded in 2005 in Rio de Janeiro, OPAVIVARÁ! is an artist collective comprised of four members, who all received BFA degrees from the Parque Lage School of Visual Arts, Rio de Janeiro. The collective has participated in group exhibitions including Ecologica, Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (2010); O Abrigo e o Torreno, Museu de Arte do Rio (2013); Acción Urgente, Fundación Proa, Buenos Aires; the Taipei Biennial (both 2014); Havana Biennial; The City Is Ours, the Body Is Mine: Urban Spatial Practices in Contemporary Latin America, James Gallery, The Graduate Center, City University of New York (both 2015); the São Paulo Biennial; Projeto Brasil/The Sky Is Already Falling, Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin; Transnomaden, Künstlerhaus, Frankfurt (all 2016). All the members of OPAVIVARÁ! live and work in Rio de Janeiro. Amalia Pica was born in 1978 in Neuquén, Argentina. She moved to Buenos Aires to study at Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes P. Pueyrredón, completing her undergraduate degree in 2001. Pica has had solo exhibitions at Malmö Konsthall, Sweden (2010); University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor (2011); Modern Art Oxford; Chisenhale Gallery, London; and Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Switzerland (all 2012); and MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City, and Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Neuquén, Argentina (all 2013); Van Abbemuseum, the Netherlands (2014); and Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany (2016). She has participated in group exhibitions including the Venice Biennale (2011, 2015); The Ungovernables: New Museum Triennial, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2012); Adventures of the Black Square, Whitechapel Gallery, London; Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (both 2015); and Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (2016). Pica received the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Award in 2011. She lives and works in London. Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa was born in 1978 in Guatemala City, receiving a BFA in Media Arts from Emily Carr University, Vancouver, in 2006, and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008. He was a postgraduate researcher at Jan Van Eyck Academie, Maastricht, the Netherlands, in 2013. Ramírez-Figueroa has had solo exhibitions at Casa de América, Madrid (2011), Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart (2011), and Gasworks, London (2015). He has participated in group exhibitions including A History of Interventions, Tate Modern, London; Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (both 2014); The School of Nature and Principle, EFA Project Space, New York; BMW Tate Live: Performance Room, Tate Modern, London (all 2015); São Paulo Biennial (both 2016); and Venice Biennale (2017). He is the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship (2012), a DAAD fellowship (2015–16) and the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award. Ramirez-Figueroa lives and works in Berlin and Guatemala City. About the Latin American Circle Formed in 2016, the Latin American Circle, co-chaired by Clarissa Bronfman and Rudy Weissenberg, is a dynamic group of art collectors actively involved in contemporary art and culture in Latin America. Dedicated to advising on and advocating for the Guggenheim’s Latin American contemporary art initiatives, the group works closely with curator Pablo León de la Barra to facilitate the museum’s ongoing efforts to diversify and strengthen its programming and collection through both emerging and established artists from Latin America. About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org. 

Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Celebrates the Opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence, Second Exhibition from The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection

ABU DHABI, March 7, 2017)Under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohamed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) celebrated today the opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence at Manarat Al Saadiyat on Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi. Featuring works by more than 25 artists from different nationalities and generations, the exhibition explores the related themes of performance, process, and presence through a variety of mediums. Running until 29 July 2017, The Creative Act is the second major exhibition of works from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection.
HE Saif Saeed Ghobash, Director General of TCA Abu Dhabi, commented on the exhibition “The Creative Act offers a transcultural perspective on defining aspects of contemporary art by highlighting interconnections among artists working in various corners of the world since the 1960s. The works in the exhibition reveal common sources of inspiration, lines of influence, and distinctive contributions. Two commissions featured in the exhibition reflect the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi’s commitment to supporting the production of new work by living artists. This exhibition marks not only the next defining step for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, but also the establishment of the future museum’s role to encourage, inspire, and inform. Only through direct interaction with artworks, themes, creative professionals, and artists can we provide future generations with a fully rounded set of tools through which to understand the development of artistic expression.”
Three distinct yet interconnected themes of the exhibition—performance, process, and presence—provide a unifying framework for the exhibition, with many artists exploring more than one theme in the works on view:
Performance can be represented in several different forms: unfolding live in a given time and place, remaining afterward as recordings and documentations, or serving primarily as the means for creating discrete objects. The Creative Act features examples of live actions that constitute works in and of themselves and performative practices that result in drawings, paintings, sculptures, and videos. A selection of photographs document the renowned Emirati artist Hassan Sharif’s 1980s performances, which he realised in both London and Dubai. His conceptual, experimental, and performative practice greatly influenced the subsequent generation of artists in the United Arab Emirates, such as Mohammed Kazem, who is also featured in The Creative Act.
Many of the artworks offer insight into the process used to make them. A key work within this section is Anish Kapoor’s My Red Homeland (2003), a monumental sculptural installation composed of nearly twenty-five tonnes of red wax with a mechanical arm that circumnavigates the platform, continually altering the surface as it moves across the material. Works by pioneering 1960s experimental art practitioners including Rasheed AraeenJulio Le ParcNiki de Saint PhalleJean TinguelyGünther Uecker, and Jacques Villeglé, explore the process of creating with everyday materials and using performative techniques.
The theme of human presence is highlighted through artworks that involve the appearance of the artist or others in the works as well as visible traces of the physical acts undertaken to realize them. Paintings by artists affiliated with the Gutai Art Association (1954–72) including Motonaga SadamasaShiraga Kazuo, and Tanaka Atsuko epitomize these ideas. Video installations by Susan Hefuna and Anri Sala take the performing arts—dance and music respectively—and the theme of interpretation as points of departure. Autobiography (03-07) (2007), a series of forty photographs and a video, captures Emirati artist Ebtisam Abdulaziz’s performances in various public spaces in Sharjah and examines the often complex relationship between social and personal identities.
The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Ph.D., Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project; Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, Abu Dhabi Project; with Sarah Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Head of Programmes – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, commented: “The Creative Act brings into focus the complexity, poetry, and power of the human spirit. The exhibition also reflects our shared understanding of the vital necessity of global exchange that is at the heart of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi project. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is proud to be working with Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority to realize this exhibition that celebrates the considerable scholarship underpinning the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection and the catalytic potential of the future museum as a vital addition to the cultural landscape of the region and the world.”
In line with the commitment of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to support original work by living artists, TCA Abu Dhabi has commissioned artists Hesam RahmanianRamin Haerizadeh, and Rokni Haerizadeh to create an installation inspired by the core themes of The Creative ActAnother Happy Day (2016–17) is a multiroom, immersive installation featuring artworks by the commissioned artists and others, which, like the selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, probe the nature of the creative artistic process while inviting visitors to become engaged and activated. This project, coupled with photographs by Tarek Al-Ghoussein, part of a series commissioned by TCA Abu Dhabi for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, offers a convergence of past, present, and future in our own time.
The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Curator and Manager of Curatorial Affairs, Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, with Sara Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Programmes Manager – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
About Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)
Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority conserves and promotes the heritage and culture of Abu Dhabi emirate and leverages them in the development of a world-class, sustainable destination of distinction, which enriches the lives of visitors and residents alike. The authority manages the emirate’s tourism sector and markets the destination internationally through a wide range of activities aimed at attracting visitors and investment. Its policies, plans and programmes relate to the preservation of heritage and culture, including protecting archaeological and historical sites and to developing museums, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. TCA Abu Dhabi supports intellectual and artistic activities and cultural events to nurture a rich cultural environment and honour the emirate’s heritage. A key authority role is to create synergy in the destination’s development through close co-ordination with its wide-ranging stakeholder base. http://tcaabudhabi.ae/en
About Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum will promote the understanding and appreciation of contemporary art, architecture, and other manifestations of modern and contemporary visual culture from an international perspective. A curatorial programme with a transcultural perspective on art and visual culture from the 1960s to the present will have a strong focus on art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia, exploring the specific identity derived from the cultural traditions of Abu Dhabi and the United Arab Emirates. The future museum, and its growing collection, is owned by the Government of Abu Dhabi. Surrounded almost entirely by water, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will have spectacular views of the Saadiyat Cultural District and the Arabian Gulf. Galleries, many unprecedented in scale, are distributed around the central atrium on four levels connected by glass bridges above. Open to the elements, the museum cones housing contemporary art commissions, recall the region’s ancient wind-towers, which both ventilate and shade the exterior courtyards in a fitting blend of Arabian tradition and modern design. The museum will also feature a 350-seat theatre, education workshops and classrooms, an onsite conservation lab, as well as a retail store, cafes, and a restaurant.
The museum will be a catalyst for scholarship in a variety of fields, chief among them the history of art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia in the 20th and 21st centuries. A dynamic programme of changing exhibitions will explore common themes and affinities among the work of artists across time and geography. An ambitious programme of commissions created for the collection and exceptional spaces of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will reinforce the museum’s commitment to working with artists and the art of our time.
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is being developed in collaboration with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationFounded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Appoints Nancy Spector to the New Post of Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator



Expanded Role Includes Leadership of Collections, Exhibitions, and Curatorial Programs at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City and All Guggenheim Museums Internationally

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NEW YORK, NY—(February 15, 2017) — Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced that Nancy Spector has been appointed to serve as the institution’s first Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, providing conceptual and strategic leadership of collections, exhibitions, and curatorial programs at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Fifth Avenue in New York and at all Guggenheim museums internationally. Through the new position of Artistic Director and Chief Curator, the Guggenheim will unify and strengthen artistic activities throughout its international constellation of museums and initiatives, both existing and in development, while accommodating the particular collections, initiatives, and audiences of each.
Nancy Spector previously served at the Guggenheim for more than 29 years, most recently in the role of Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator. She joined the Brooklyn Museum in April 2016 as Deputy Director and Chief Curator. As Artistic Director and Chief Curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, she will report directly to Richard Armstrong.
Richard Armstrong said, “Over the past year, we have given fresh thought to the way the Guggenheim creates and manages its artistic program in New York and abroad. This exploration has identified the need for an individual who provides leadership and strategic vision for collections, exhibitions and programs across all aspects of the Foundation and all the museums in our international constellation. During her many years at the Guggenheim, Nancy Spector shaped our institution in singular and significant ways. She is the ideal person to take on this new role working with the Guggenheim to realize and reimagine the radical purpose its founders gave it 80 years ago. We are pleased to welcome her into her new role.”
Nancy Spector said, “I’m grateful to Anne Pasternak, the Trustees and the wonderful staff of the Brooklyn Museum for giving me the opportunity to work with them and learn from them in their great institution. It has been a privilege to participate in the museum’s vital engagement with its community and to address the possibilities of its encyclopedic collection. But when Richard Armstrong approached me with the new position of Artistic Director at the Guggenheim, I simply could not let this extraordinary opportunity—which is truly unique to the Guggenheim—pass me by. I look forward to working with my Guggenheim colleagues in New York and around the world in envisioning the many innovative programs and initiatives we will create together in the coming years.”
Anne Pasternak, the Shelby White and Leon Levy Director of the Brooklyn Museum, added, “We are truly grateful to Nancy for the wisdom and leadership she contributed during her tenure here at the Brooklyn Museum. From her thoughtful strategic planning contributions to reenergizing our curatorial department, exhibiting more of our historic collections, working on curatorial collaborations and prestigious partnerships, and boosting our public programs. Her time here has been a time of real action. We will build on these foundations and look forward to collaborating with Nancy in the future. We wish her all the best in this great new international adventure.”

About Nancy Spector

Nancy Spector received her Masters Degree in Art History from the Clark Art Institute at Williams College and her MPhil from City University Graduate Center in New York after graduating from Sarah Lawrence College. During more than 29 years at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, including 10 years as Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, she organized exhibitions on conceptual photography, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Matthew Barney’s Cremaster cycle, Richard Prince, Louise Bourgeois (with Tate Modern), Marina Abramovic, Tino Sehgal, Maurizio Cattelan and Peter Fischli/David Weiss. She also organized the group exhibitions Moving PicturesSingular Forms (Sometimes Repeated); and theanyspacewhatever. She was Adjunct Curator of the 1997 Venice Biennale and co-organizer of the first Berlin Biennial in 1998. Under the auspices of the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin, she initiated special commissions by Andreas Slominski, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Lawrence Weiner, and Gabriel Orozco, as well as a special exhibition on the work of Joseph Beuys and Matthew Barney.
She has contributed to numerous books on contemporary visual culture with essays on artists such as Maurizio Cattelan, Luc Tuymans, Roni Horn, Janine Antoni, Douglas Gordon, Tino Seghal, and Mona Hatoum. In 2007 she was the U.S. Commissioner for the Venice Biennale, where she presented an exhibition of work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Spector is a recipient of the Peter Norton Family Foundation Curators Award, five International Art Critics Association Awards, and a Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award for her work on Youtube Play, a Biennial of Creative Video. In 2014, she was included in the 40 Women Over 40 to Watch list. At the Brooklyn Museum, where she worked for as Deputy Director and Curator from 2016-17, she reorganized the curatorial staff structure, launched the 10-exhibition program Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism, and spearheaded the cross-collection, long-term exhibition Infinite Blue

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum & Foundation

Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
ZhouTao_InstallationViewTalesOfOurTime
SPRING 2017 PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
The Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and film series in conjunction with the exhibitions Tales of Our Time and Visionaries: Creating a Modern GuggenheimMORE >
Tales of Our Time Programs
Gallery Reading: Ken Liu
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 12 PM 
Author Ken Liu (The Grace of Kings and The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories) reads from his commissioned short story in the Tales of Our Time exhibition catalogue and other texts inspired by works on view.

Free with museum admission. Limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Film Premiere and Director Q&A: The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
The Guggenheim hosts the U.S. premiere of The Swim, an art film with documentary characteristics. To create the film, artist He Xiangyu returned three times to his hometown in Kuandian—a poor county located by the Yalu River on the China–North Korea border. Through interviews with Korean War veterans, defectors from North Korea, and their families, The Swim unveils the cruel reality hidden behind the beautiful scenery of Kuandian and presents the utopian fantasy projected on individuals. The event concludes with a Q&A with He Xiangyu and Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Hypnotic Show
TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 7 AND 9:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 7 AND 9:30 PM
An exhibition that takes place in the mind—individual and collective—this intimate experiment in cognitive exhibition making through art and hypnosis was conceived by Raimundas Malašauskas and Marcos Lutyens. It explores how the image and concept of place can be depicted through alternative modes of narrative and serves as an imaginary ending to the exhibition.

$18, $15 members, $10 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken: Tea Gatherings
WEDNESDAYS, THROUGH MARCH 8, 1:30–5:45 PM
Since 2002 Yangjiang Group has been inviting neighbors in Yangjiang, its small hometown on the southern coast of China, to drink tea, play soccer, practice calligraphy, and enjoy communal dinners. As part of Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken, their newly commissioned work for Tales of Our Time, visitors are invited to converse and contemplate calligraphy over a cup of tea prepared and served by local tea brewers. Visitors are also encouraged to measure their blood pressure and heart rate before and after experiencing this installation—a humorous ploy designed to calculate the purported relaxing effects of a tea gathering.

Free with museum admission. No RSVP is required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Tours in Mandarin
SATURDAYS, 12–1 PM
Join a conversational tour of Tales of Our Time in Mandarin facilitated by an educator trained in art history and gallery teaching.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Film Program
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, THROUGH FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
These documentary and narrative films explore topics shared with the exhibition, investigating concepts such as boundaries, territory, migration, and place. Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings

February 3–4Traces of an Invisible City, directed by Bo Wang and Pan Lu; The Wangs, directed by Bo Wang (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 10–11Life after Life, directed by Zhang Hanyi
February 17–18Terra Nullius or: How to Be a Nationalist, directed by James T. Hong (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 24–25The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu (February 25 screening includes a Q&A session with the director.)
Visionaries Programs
Long-Look Wednesdays
WEDNESDAYS, FEBRUARY–AUGUST 
Each Wednesday during the run of Visionaries, museum visitors have the opportunity to explore the Guggenheim collection, including one-hour focused experiences with a single work, in specialist-led learning experiences.

One Hour, One Object Tours
WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM Join a museum educator trained in art, art history, and gallery teaching to spend an hour focusing in detail on one work of art through conversation and close looking.

Collection in Focus
SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 12 PM Join a curator and conservator in the galleries for an in-depth discussion of topics including new historical research and scientific conservation studies/analyses. Limited capacity.

Curator’s Eye Tour of Visionaries
APRIL 12, 12 PM Megan Fontanella, Curator, Collections and Provenance, and curator of Visionaries, leads a tour of the exhibition.
Free with museum admission. Some events have limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar. 
Eye to Eye: Artist-Led Tours
TUESDAYS, APRIL 11 AND MAY 23, 6:30 PM
Guggenheim collection artists lead intimate after-hours tours through Visionaries, offering their unique perspectives on the works and  reflections on such topics as abstraction, mediums, and materials. Each program includes a reception in the Guggenheim rotunda.

April 11: Lucy Dodd
May 23: Julia Dault

$25, $20 members, $12 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar
Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, MARCH 3–25, 1 PM
On the occasion of Women’s History Month, the Guggenheim hosts weekly screenings of Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland. The film focuses on a key figure in the Guggenheim’s institutional history as she moved through the cultural upheaval of the 20th century to build one of the most important collections of modern art today.

Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with admission. For the full schedule, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture
John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone
APRIL 25, 6:30 PM 
Poet John Giorno and artist Ugo Rondinone met at a reading in 1997 and have since become life partners and each other’s muses. For the Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture, Giorno and Rondinone discuss and reflect on their respective creative practices  in a conversation moderated by Laura Hoptman, Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, Museum of Modern Art. The program concludes with a reception in the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda.
Free with RSVP. To RSVP or for more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

This series is facilitated by the donors to the Robert Rosenblum Fund who are greatly acknowledged for their generosity.
Mind’s Eye Tours
SELECT MONDAYS, 6:30 PM, AND SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM 
For visitors who are blind or have low vision, these tours and workshops are presented through verbal description, conversation, sensory experiences, and creative practice. Free, RSVP required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/mindseye.

Monday, February 13: Love and Art
Wednesday, March 8: Visionaries
Monday, April 3: Guggenheim Collection: Focus on Brancusi
Art After Dark
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 9 PM–MIDNIGHT; EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS' HOUR: 8–9 PM 
An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions, including Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim and Tales of Our Time, featuring a cash bar and live musical entertainment.

Free for members, $25 general admission. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door.


 China Institute
  Renwen Society

Symposium on Liu Haisu,    

Pioneer of Modern Chinese Art

Sunday, December 42:00-4:00pm

Speakers: Ms. Liu Chan, Mr. Chen Lusheng, Ms. Zhang Anna
Event fee: FREE
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006




Liu Haisu was a prominent twentieth-century Chinese painter and a noted art educator. He excelled at combining traditional Chinese painting methods with European techniques, especially those of van Gogh and Cézanne, and promoted this style as a model for revolutionizing art education in China. As the leader of art schools in Shanghai and Nanjing, Liu exerted extraordinary influence. The scion of a distinguished literary family, Liu studied calligraphy under Kang Youwei and traditional landscape and flower painting under Wu Changshi and Chen Hengke. He became one of the founders of the Shanghai Academy, the first art college in modern China. During the 1920s and '30s he organized several important national and international exhibitions and toured Japan and Europe, where he studied Western techniques and exhibited his own works. As a teacher, Liu maintained that painters should combine a knowledge of formal art theory with their natural talent and personal judgment, a departure from the Chinese tradition of copying the compositions and techniques of old masters. His works in traditional Chinese style were free-flowing and brilliant in color.  

To commemorate the 120th anniversary of his birth, The Renwen Society presents a special symposium on the art legend on Sunday, December 42-4 pmSpeakers include: 
Ms. Liu Chan, daughter of Liu Haisu, Guest Professor at Nanjing University of the Arts, Honorary President of the Liu Haisu Gallery in Changzhou 
Mr. Chen Lusheng, Former Vice President of the National Museum of China 
Ms. Zhang Anna, President of Changzhou Liu Haisu-Xiayiqiao Art Museum

Follow Renwen's WeChat: chineselectures  


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Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Announces Second Exhibition of Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection: The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence

Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Announces Second Exhibition of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection, Opening March 8






















The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence will offer a transcultural perspective on art since the 1960s
Niki de Saint Phalle
Pirodactyl over New York, 1962
Paint, plaster, and various objects on two wood panels, 249.9 x 309.9 x 29.8 cm
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
© Niki Charitable Art Foundation; Courtesy Galerie Georges – Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Photo: © André Morain, Courtesy Niki Charitable Art Foundation and Galerie GP & N Vallois, Paris

Exhibition: The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence
Venue: Manarat Al Saadiyat, Cultural District, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
On View: March 8, 2017
(ABU DHABI, November 7, 2016)Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) announced today the second exhibition of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, The Creative Act: Performance• Process • Presence, at Manarat Al Saadiyat on Saadiyat Island. The exhibition, which will run from March 8, 2017, will bring together artists of different nationalities and generations who have emphasised performance, process, and human presence in their practice, offering a transcultural perspective on these defining aspects of contemporary art. The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence follows the 2014 exhibition Seeing Through Light: Selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection, which welcomed more than 90,000 visitors and presented artworks from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection for the first time.
HE Saif Saeed Ghobash, Director General of TCA Abu Dhabi, said: “Abu Dhabi has become a vibrant cultural destination through unique public engagement programmes establishing an interactive dialogue between Abu Dhabi and the world, and creating its own cultural characteristic around its urban and contemporary landscapes. The Creative Act exhibition will emphasise intertwined histories among countries, within regions, and across continents, consistent with the curatorial vision of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, and echoing TCA Abu Dhabi’s strategic endeavours to transform Abu Dhabi to a hub for world cultures. This exhibition will highlight connections between contemporary artists revealing common sources of inspiration, lines of influence, and distinctive contributions.”
Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation said:  “As with Seeing Through LightThe Creative Act presents some of the dynamic, original curatorial research underway for the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi and draws back the curtain on the creative process through the work of a diverse group of artists featured in the growing collection. Many works in the exhibition focus on particular locales, among them Abu Dhabi, London, New York, Paris, and Tokyo. Both individually and collectively, they reveal a sense of wonder and magic that can be found in the everyday.”
The Creative Act exhibition will feature more than 25 works in a variety of media—installation, painting, photography, sculpture, video, and works on paper, representing more than 18 artists. The exhibition will focus on the related themes of performance, process, and presence, which frame the exhibition’s curatorial narrative:
PerformancePerformances can unfold in a given time and place, remaining afterward as recordings and documentations, and they can serve primarily as the means for creating discrete objects. Since the 1960s, many artists have adopted performative practices, sometimes serving as the central protagonist and undertaking carefully choreographed or spontaneous actions, and other times functioning as directors by providing instructions to participants. These aspects will be explored in The Creative Act, through works by artists such as Rasheed Araeen and Mohammed Kazem.
ProcessThe exhibition will bring together artworks that emphasise the act of creation and will feature photographs, films, videos, and archival documentation that will animate the methodology, inspiration, and innovation of the included artists. Many of the artists stress the importance of process, producing works that reveal how they were made, that forefront materiality, and that allow for transformation over time or in response to viewer interaction. Their art and related archival materials will bring to life the dynamic working methods of artists such as Shiraga Kazuo and Tanaka Atsuko, who were associated with the Gutai Art Association (Japan, 1954–1972). The Creative Act also will feature another group of 1960s pioneers, among them Niki de Saint Phalle and Günther Uecker, who are known for their development of experimental approaches that involve the use of ostensibly destructive techniques and everyday materials to comment on contemporary society. The section will also feature an artwork by Anish Kapoor who is known for his large-scale geometric and biomorphic sculptures reminiscent of nature and living organisms.
Presence
The Creative Act also will delve into the theme of human presence, manifested by the appearance of the artist or others in the artworks as well as visible traces of the physical acts undertaken to realise them. Three immersive installations particularly exemplify this aspect. Works on paper and a video installation by Susan Hefuna examine similarities between the choreography of dance and people’s everyday movements as they traverse city streets.
The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Ph.D., Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project; Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, Abu Dhabi Project; with Sarah Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Head of Programmes – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
About Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)
Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority conserves and promotes the heritage and culture of Abu Dhabi emirate and leverages them in the development of a world-class, sustainable destination of distinction, which enriches the lives of visitors and residents alike. The authority manages the emirate’s tourism sector and markets the destination internationally through a wide range of activities aimed at attracting visitors and investment. Its policies, plans and programmes relate to the preservation of heritage and culture, including protecting archaeological and historical sites and to developing museums, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. TCA Abu Dhabi supports intellectual and artistic activities and cultural events to nurture a rich cultural environment and honour the emirate’s heritage. A key authority role is to create synergy in the destination’s development through close co-ordination with its wide-ranging stakeholder base. http://tcaabudhabi.ae/en
About Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum will promote the understanding and appreciation of contemporary art, architecture, and other manifestations of modern and contemporary visual culture from an international perspective. A curatorial programme with a transcultural perspective on art and visual culture from the 1960s to the present will have a strong focus on art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia, exploring the specific identity derived from the cultural traditions of Abu Dhabi and the United Arab Emirates. The future museum, and its growing collection, is owned by the Government of Abu Dhabi. Surrounded almost entirely by water, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will have spectacular views of the Saadiyat Cultural District and the Arabian Gulf. Galleries, many unprecedented in scale, are distributed around the central atrium on four levels connected by glass bridges above. Open to the elements, the museum cones housing contemporary art commissions, recall the region’s ancient wind-towers, which both ventilate and shade the exterior courtyards in a fitting blend of Arabian tradition and modern design. The museum will also feature a 350-seat theatre, education workshops and classrooms, an onsite conservation lab, as well as a retail store, cafes, and a restaurant.
The museum will be a catalyst for scholarship in a variety of fields, chief among them the history of art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia in the 20th and 21st centuries. A dynamic programme of changing exhibitions will explore common themes and affinities among the work of artists across time and geography. An ambitious programme of commissions created for the collection and exceptional spaces of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will reinforce the museum’s commitment to working with artists and the art of our time.
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is being developed in collaboration with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationFounded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.



 China Institute
 Public Program

New York Asian Film Festival Screening & Reception: What's in the Darkness

Schedule:
Monday, June 27 
6:15 pm - 7:50 pm: Film Screening 
7:55 pm - 8:25 pm: Q&A with Director Wang Yichun 
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm: Reception featuring a talk with Subway Cinema, Freida & Roy Furman Gallery 

Location:
Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center, 165 West 65th Street, New York, 10023

Event fee:
Reception is Free 
Screening: $14 general, $11 students & senior, $9 FSLC member

The 2015 Village Voice Best Film Festival award winner is back! China Institute is thrilled to be a part of this year's New York Asian Film Festival, co-hosting the North American Premiere ofWhat's in the Darkness. A coming-of-age fable mapped onto an unsolved crime story, at once dream-hazed and sharp-edged with suspense, Variety called writer/director Wang Yichun's outstanding debut "the most acute and uncompromisingly grim murder mystery to come out of China in years." Following the screening there will be a Q&A with director Wang Yichun and a free reception hosted by China Institute and sponsored by Tsingtao Beer.

What's In The Darkness
Wang Yichun, China, 2015, DCP, 98m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Starring: Su Xiaotong, Guo Xiao, Lu Qiwei, Deng Gang

A coming-of-age fable mapped onto an unsolved crime story, at once dream-hazed and sharp-edged with suspense, Variety called writer/director Wang Yichun's outstanding debut "the most acute and uncompromisingly grim murder mystery to come out of China in years," but the film owes as much to The Diary of a Teenage Girl as it does to Diary of a Serial KillerWhat's in the Darkness brilliantly evokes the perils of repressed desire, while equating China's transition to capitalism with the prurient confusion of puberty. In a semi-rural village of Hebei Province in the early 1990s, someone is raping and killing young women, and carving a cross into their flesh. Following the case with perverse fascination, Jing (Su Xiaotong) struggles to harness her emerging sexuality while her father (Guo Xiao), a low-level cop, futilely tries to convince his incompetent colleagues of the merits of forensic investigation. Presented with the support of China Institute. Learn More Forward to a Friend! Events Calendar  Join Our Mailing List


For questions or to register by phone, please contact Michael Buening at 212-744-8181 ext. 149 or by email at mbuening@chinainstitute.org

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GUGGENHEIM
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise
BUT A STORM IS BLOWING FROM PARADISE: PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM
In conjunction with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa, the museum presents the following programs.
VIEW CALENDAR
Hello Guggenheim: Film and Video Curated by Bidoun Projects
FRIDAYS–MONDAYS IN MAY, 1 PM 
Hello Guggenheim is a diverse four-week program of films and videos that are united in their mistrust of inherited narratives about history and documentation, testimony and voice. By turns fantastical and irreverent, adversarial and contrived, the works in Hello Guggenheim provide an unusual and uniquely compelling vantage onto the politics of truth of the moving image. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. Screenings take place in the New Media Theater and last between 60 and 90 minutes. MORE >
Curator’s Eye Tours
Join Guggenheim curators on a focused tour of But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. Curator’s Eye tours meet at the Information Desk. MORE >
Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa
FRIDAY, MAY 13, 12 PM
This tour will be ASL interpreted.
Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 12 PM
Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa
FRIDAY, SEPT 23, 12 PM
Conversations at the Crossroads
This series pairs scholars and educators to explore the exhibitions ideas and meanings. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. MORE >
Joseph Massad, Professor of Modern Arab Politics and Intellectual History, Columbia University
SUNDAY, MAY 22, 3 PM
Tim Cresswell, Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs; Professor of History and International Affairs; Associate Director for Public Humanities, Humanities Center, Northeastern University
SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 3 PM
Talinn Grigor, Professor of Art History and Graduate Adviser, University of California, Davis
SUNDAY, JULY 17, 3 PM
Exhibition Tours in Arabic بالعربية
JUNE 18, 12 PM
JULY 23, 12 PM
AUG 20, 12 PM
SEPT 17, 12 PM
Join a conversational tour conducted in Arabic led by a specialist in art history and education. This tour will focus on the themes and artworks in the exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. This tour meets on the rotunda floor. MORE >
Exhibition Tours en français
JUNE 25, 12 PM
JULY 30, 12 PM
AUG 27, 12 PM
SEPT 24, 12 PM
Join a conversational tour conducted in French led by a specialist in art history and education. This tour will focus on the themes and artworks in the exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. This tour meets on the rotunda floor. MORE >
Lectures & Symposia
An Evening with Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira
TUESDAY, JULY 12, 6:30 PM
In this program, artists Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira provide short talks about their works on view in But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Following, they join Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, for a group discussion about themes in the exhibition. Registration details will soon be available. MORE >
(De)Coupling as Discourse or The Rise of the Global South
SEPTEMBER 2016
Organized by Sara Raza, this symposium unites elements from the three phases of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative to explore the rise of contemporary art activity in the Global South. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.
Summer Drawing Series
JULY 17, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
JULY 24, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
JULY 31, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
Families participate in an interactive gallery tour of But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise and respond to it using various approaches to drawing that encourage a new experience of the works on view. Free with advanced registration. Families with children ages 7 and up. MORE >
Mind’s Eye with Susan Hefuna
MONDAY, AUGUST 1, 2 PM
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2 PM
Led by exhibition artist Susan Hefuna, this two-part workshop welcomes visitors who are blind or have low vision to explore walking and alternative sensory experience as part of the creative process. Free with RSVP. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.
Looking Ahead
Public Movement: Debriefing Session II
SUMMER/FALL 2016
The research group Public Movement invites museum visitors to attend a one-on-one debriefing on modern art made in Palestine before 1948. The private session draws out the performative relationship between nation-states and their cultural institutions. Free with museum admission. RSVP required. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.

Guggenheim Presents Recent Art from the Middle East and North Africa in the Third Exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative

But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise Opens April 29 at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and Travels to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017


Exhibition: But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North AfricaVenue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Tower 4 and Tower 5 Galleries
Dates: April 29–October 5, 2016
Media Preview: Thursday, April 28, 2016, 10 am–12 pm
(NEW YORK, NY—April 28, 2016)—From April 29 to October 5, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York presents But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa, the third exhibition of theGuggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. Organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, the exhibition features a wide range of artistic voices and critical concerns from a rapidly evolving region through installation, photography, sculpture, video, and work on paper. Interwoven with questions and ideas about the region’s colonial histories, the exhibition investigates such themes as architecture and geometry, modernism and migration, and the process of unearthing hidden ideas.
As with the two previous exhibitions in the MAP initiative, which focused on contemporary art practice from South and Southeast Asia and Latin America, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise features artworks that have been recently acquired for the Guggenheim’s collection. Under the auspices of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund, the collection has now grown by over 125 works from more than 85 artists and collectives. Curatorial research for the exhibition was developed with an eye toward building on the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism, as well as fostering new scholarship and conceiving a range of educational initiatives and public programs within the museum and online. On-site and digital programs have served more than 14,000 adults, families, educators, and students worldwide. Following its presentation at the Guggenheim, the exhibition will travel to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017.
Sara Raza said, “The exhibition enables viewers to experience a range of concerns among artists from a variety of access points to showcase the cross-circulation of knowledge. One of them is the migration of ideas and peoples in an age of anxiety, when civil liberties and freedom of movement have come under repeated attack. Another is architecture seen as an ideological tool and in reference to the former colonial powers that shaped the region. The exhibition’s artworks also embed numerous proposals—we might think of them as ‘conceptual contraband’—that contradict the mass media’s highly politicized representation of the Middle East and North Africa. As such, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradisehighlights the formation of the present while acknowledging the continued influence of the past.”
“This exhibition bristles with challenging ideas and uncompromising artistic strategies, all of which help us to reflect upon a crucial region of today’s world,” said Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation. “It is a superb realization of the ambitions of the MAP initiative in particular and the Guggenheim’s global program in general. We are grateful to our long-term collaborator and supporter UBS, to Sara Raza and our curatorial and education team, and to the artists in this exhibition for helping us rethink and expand the traditional purview of European and North American art museums. By working on the ground in different regions of the world with artists, arts professionals, and audiences, we can open the discussion to multiple histories of art and create a museum that more faithfully represents the world in which we live.”
“Artists rooted in the vibrant cultures of the Middle East and North Africa are currently addressing some of today’s most critical issues, and doing so from within a region at the center of sweeping global change,” said Jürg Zeltner, CEO, UBS Wealth Management. “The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative provides an exceptional opportunity to encounter the crucial ideas and insights of some of the best of these artists, and to engage in the kind of international dialogue that contributes to positive change. At UBS, our support for this exhibition, and for the MAP initiative as a whole, parallels our holistic approach to business relationships. We take pride in enabling our clients, employees, and the public to participate in the provocative and exciting creative community of the arts, much as we facilitate our clients’ informed involvement in the complex global economy.”
Exhibition Overview
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise features 18 works—many of them large-scale, mixed media installations—by 17 artists. The exhibition, installed on two levels of the museum’s Tower Galleries, draws its title from an artwork by Rokni Haerizadeh, which in turn is quoted from German philosopher Walter Benjamin in a noted essay from 1940. Haerizadeh’s But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise (2010) is a suite of works on paper based on images appropriated from mainstream news sources. By overlaying these photographs of collective gatherings with gesso, ink, and watercolor, the artist employs fable to transform human protagonists into part-animal hybrids while rendering a grotesque view of downward descending contemporary events promulgated by the mass media.
Other works that implicitly challenge existing representations of the Middle East and North Africa include Latent Images, Diary of a Photographer, 177 Days of Performances (2015) by Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, an installation of 354 books, displayed on 177 metal shelves, that purport to contain written descriptions of pictures taken by a fictional photographer, Abdallah Farah, during the Lebanese Civil War to illustrate the fine line between the process of mythmaking and the “real.”
Among the works that touch on the urgent subject of the migration of people and ideas isFlying Carpets (2011) by Nadia Kaabi-Linke, a stainless steel structure installed overhead that casts shadows in the gallery that evoke the outlines of the carpets on which undocumented migrants from North Africa and Asia display the goods they sell to tourists in Venice.
Architecture figures as a key element in the formation of modernism in the region and is prevalent in several works including Untitled (Ghardaïa) (2009) by Kader Attia, a scale model in couscous of the Algerian World Heritage Site of Ghardaïa, the traditional buildings of which influenced the modernism of Le Corbusier; Building (2009) by Susan Hefuna, a suite of nine drawings that suggest both cartographic diagrams and sketches of architectural elements such as the mashrabiya or traditional latticed window; Plan for Greater Baghdad(2015) by Ala Younis, a large installation of archival materials and architectural models of the gymnasium designed for Baghdad in 1957 by Le Corbusier and inaugurated in 1980 as the Saddam Hussein Gymnasium. By contrast, Abbas Akhavan’s Study for a Monument(2013–16), a series of bronze casts of plants native to the Tigris-Euphrates river system that are placed on the floor atop white sheets, suggests a range of alternative ideas around the culture and dissemination of public monuments.
A hybridized view of past and present is presented by Ergin Çavuşoğlu’s work Crystal & Flame (2010), which draws on literary texts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to meditate on social norms and moral codes through the depiction of three outwardly disparate but ultimately complimentary narratives that probe systems of value and polarity in contemporary society. Similarly, Ahmed Mater’s Disarm (2013) and Disarm 1–10 (2013), present video and photographs taken by the artist from the cockpit of a Saudi military helicopter scouting for unauthorized pilgrims approaching Meccathereby highlighting an urban landscape undergoing rapid structural and social change.
To showcase the breadth of videos acquired, two will be rotated halfway through the installation: A Brief History of Collapses (2012) by Mariam Ghani, a two-channel video installation that contrasts the eighteenth-century Fridericianum in Kassel, Germany (now restored from the damage it suffered in World War II) with the Dar ul-Aman Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan (built in 1929 and now a ruin), will be on view through July 6, along with Çavuşoğlu’s Crystal & Flame. Zineb Sedira’s Gardiennes d’images (2010), a multichannel video that explores the archive of Algerian-French photographer Mohammed Kouaci (1922–1996), who was active during the Algerian war of independence, and the reminiscences of his widow who is interviewed by the artist, will be on view from July 8 through the close of the exhibition. Evaders (2009), a two-channel video installation by Ori Gersht, which chronicles the 1940 flight into exile and subsequent death of Walter Benjamin, returns to the pertinent subject of migration and will also be on view beginning on July 8.
Artists represented in the exhibition are:
  • Abbas Akhavan (b. 1977, Tehran; lives and works in Toronto)
  • Kader Attia (b. 1970, Paris; lives and works in Berlin)
  • Ergin Çavuşoğlu (b. 1968, Targovishte, Bulgaria; lives and works in London)
  • Ali Cherri (b. 1976, Beirut; live and works in Beirut and Paris)
  • Ori Gersht (b. 1967, Tel Aviv; lives and works in London
  • Mariam Ghani (b. 1978, New York; lives and works in New York)
  • Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige (b. 1969, Beirut, Lebanon; live and work in Beirut and Paris)
  • Rokni Haerizadeh (b. 1978, Tehran; lives and works in Dubai)
  • Susan Hefuna (b. 1962, Berlin; lives and works in Düsseldorf)
  • Iman Issa (b. 1979, Cairo; lives and works in New York)
  • Nadia Kaabi-Linke (b. 1978, Tunis; lives and works in Berlin)
  • Mohammed Kazem (b. 1969, Dubai; lives and works in Dubai)
  • Hassan Khan (b. 1975, London; lives and works in Cairo)
  • Ahmed Mater (b. 1979, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia; lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)
  • Zineb Sedira (b. 1963, Paris; lives and works in London)
  • Ala Younis (b. 1974, Kuwait; lives and works in Amman, Jordan, and London)
Additional acquisitions for the Guggenheim UBS MAP collection include work by artists Lida Abdul (b. 1973, Kabul; lives and works in Los Angeles and Kabul), Emily Jacir (b. 1972, Bethlehem, lives and works in Rome, Italy and Ramallah, Palestine) and Gülsün Karamustafa (b. 1946, Ankara, Turkey; lives and works in Istanbul.)
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa is organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa. Joan Young, Director of Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, provides curatorial oversight for the MAP initiative with Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator.
Public and Education Programs
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise is accompanied by a range of public, educational, and online programs. Highlights include a summer launch of performative debriefings by research group Public Movement that reexamine art histories throughout the exhibition, as well as a residency with Beirut-based artist and musician Raed Yassin, who will create a soundtrack inspired by the exhibition’s themes to be released in late July; a four-week film series, Hello Guggenheim, co-presented with Bidoun Projects from May 6 to 30; an Open House for Educators on May 16; artist talks featuring Ahmed Mater and Ala Younis on April 30 and Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira on July 12; Sunday gallery conversations with multidisciplinary educators and scholars; gallery tours in Arabic and French on select Saturdays; a special two-part Mind’s Eye workshop for people who are blind or have low vision led by artist Susan Hefuna on August 1 and 10; an academic symposium in September; a technology and new media arts-based summer camp for 8- to 11-year olds from June 13 to 17, and a summer drawing series for families on July 17, 24, and 31, and drop-in family and school programs throughout the run of the exhibition. Education resources include a Family Activity Guide and Teacher’s Resource Guide, and a multimedia app featuring both commentary by the curator and exhibition artists, and verbal descriptions authored by Guggenheim educators. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
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Guggenheim Launches New Website Design
Enhanced Features Maximize Interaction with Art and Ideas

VIEW THE RELEASE

(NEW YORK, NY—April 21, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation launched an updated Guggenheim.org today, with a new user experience and design that places artworks at center stage, facilitates easy navigation of visitor information, and encourages engagement with the Guggenheim’s global, educational, and curatorial programs. The relaunch maximizes users’ interaction with art and ideas while preserving the institution’s visual and conceptual heritage.

It Takes Two at the Guggenheim Museum on April 23

Noted Speakers and Performers Address Creativity in Pairs Across Art, Architecture, Dance, Film, and Music for the Final Week of Peter Fischli and David Weiss Retrospective
Participants to Include Artist Matthew Barney and Composer Jonathan Bepler, Experimental Electronic Band Matmos, Architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Filmmakers and Producers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi, and Philosopher Simon Critchley
(NEW YORK, NY—March 30, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents It Takes Two on Saturday, April 23 from 9 pm to 4 am. This durational, multidisciplinary program is presented on the occasion of the retrospective Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, on view through April 27. For the program, exhibition curators Nancy Spector and Nat Trotman, with Ben Vershbow, Director, New York Public Library Labs, invited a wide range of speakers and performers to address questions posed by Fischli and Weiss’s lifelong collaboration, including: Why do creative minds gravitate toward one another? What is the unique result of creating in pairs? Why is the trope of the comic/tragic duo so prevalent in film and literature?
Tickets are $30, $20 members, $15 students, and include overnight access to the Fischli Weiss exhibition. A cash bar will be available. Further details, an event schedule, and ticketing information will be posted atwww.guggenheim.org/ittakestwo
The list of participants is as follows, and is subject to change:
Artist Matthew Barney and composer Jonathan Bepler
Professor Beatriz Colomina, Princeton University
Lise Anne Couture and Hani Rashid, Asymptote Architecture
Professor and philosopher Simon Critchley, The New School
Performance duo Dancenoise
Filmmakers and producers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi, of the series “Making a Murderer”
Architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio
Artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset
Art and performance duo Fischerspooner
Artist duo Gerard & Kelly
Renate Goldmann, Director of the Leopold-Hoesch-Museum and Papiermuseum Düren, Germany
Choreographer David Gordon and dancer Valda Setterfield
Artists and fashion photographers Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin
Academy Award-winning songwriters Kristen and Bobby Lopez, of Disney’s film Frozen
Artist Nate Lowman
Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec, creators of the Dear Data project
Experimental electronic band Matmos
Curator Linda Murray, New York Public Library
Associate Professor Bibiana Obler, George Washington University
Curator Christopher Phillips, International Center of Photography
Curator Doug Reside, New York Public Library
Multimedia performance and music duo Royal Osiris Karaoke Ensemble
Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of Powers of Two
Artist duo Doug and Mike Starn
Architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien
For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online atguggenheim.org and guggenheim.org/connect.
Exhibition Funders
Major support for the exhibition has been provided by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

The Leadership Committee for Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Chairs Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann. Additional support is provided by Matthew Marks; Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Glenstone; Collection Ringier; Alfred Richterich; Per Skarstedt; Walter A. Bechtler Foundation, Switzerland; Thomas Ammann Fine Art AG, Zürich; Ulla Dreyfus-Best; Hauser & Wirth; Gigi and Andrea Kracht; Arend and Brigitte Oetker; and Sylvie Winckler.

Funding is also generously provided by ART MENTOR FOUNDATION LUCERNE, National Endowment for the Arts, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, and New York State Council on the Arts.



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Artists from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan Commissioned to Create New Works for Guggenheim Collection and Fall 2016 Exhibition

Five individual artists, an artists’ group, and a collaborative duo selected through The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative at the Guggenheim
Download a PDF of the release in EnglishSimplified Chinese, and Traditional Chinese.
(NEW YORK, NY—March 21, 2016)—Today, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum announced the artists who have been commissioned to create works that will enter its collection as part of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. Hailing from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, Chia-En Jao, Kan Xuan, Sun Xun, Sun Yuan & Peng Yu, Tsang Kin-Wah, Yangjiang Group, and Zhou Tao will produce works for a group exhibition opening on November 4, 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum. Working in a range of mediums, including video, sculpture, installation, mixed media on paper, and participatory intervention, these artists are unified by their distinctive and independent practices that poetically balance politics and aesthetics. Featuring the new commissioned works, the Guggenheim presentation will offer a heterogeneous view of contemporary art from China and explore tensions between individual narratives and the constructions of mainstream history. The exhibition, the second of the initiative, will be accompanied by a catalogue and a robust offering of educational programs and public events with artists.
The exhibition is organized by Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, and Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art. The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is part of the Guggenheim Museum’s Asian Art Initiative, directed by Dr. Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art and Senior Advisor, Global Arts.
Launched in 2013, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is the most recent of the Guggenheim’s initiatives to work with artists, scholars, and curators from around the world to bring intersecting regional and global histories of modernism and contemporary practices to the fore. Made possible by a major grant from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation, this international curatorial program focuses on commissioning major works for the Guggenheim’s collection by artists born in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macao. All works created through the initiative will become part of the Guggenheim’s collection, forming The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection. Through the selection of key artists, practices, and issues arising from across Greater China, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative seeks to strengthen the Guggenheim’s collegial network among the Chinese art community, advance the study and appreciation of post-1979 Chinese art, and expand the discourse and investigation of contemporary art today. The first of the initiative’s three exhibitions, Wang Jianwei: Time Temple, was on view at the Guggenheim from October 2014 to February 2015 and featured a sculptural installation, paintings, a film, and a performance by Wang Jianwei, one of China’s leading conceptual artists.
The second exhibition will continue the Guggenheim’s history of site-specific works developed in collaboration between artists and curators. The artists—who were selected after extensive curatorial research and studio visits—share a socially aware perspective, actively repositioning and challenging current dialogues about art from Greater China in an international context. The commissioned artists are:
Chia-En Jao (b. 1976, Taipei)
Chia-En Jao’s project-based practice stretches across different mediums, including drawing, performance, site-specific installation, and multichannel video installation. After studying, working, and exhibiting in Europe, Jao returned to Taipei where he currently lives and works. This international experience informs his perspective on the particular conditions of Taiwan’s political, economical, and social situation. His practice—deeply rooted in his local surroundings—has more recently delved into colonial histories and the cross-cultural tensions in the Asia Pacific region. His anthropological and collaborative approach has led him to work with civilian protestors, taxi drivers, and immigrant workers from Southeast Asian countries. For Jao, these personal encounters have generated intriguing and valuable interpretations of history that subtly subvert and question the established, official versions produced by the nation-state and media.
Kan Xuan (b. 1972, Xuancheng, Anhui Province)
Kan Xuan uses video as her primary medium, and also experiments with photography, installation, and performance. Kan moved to Hangzhou to study at the China Academy of Art and subsequently attended the prestigious residency program at Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. Through visual manipulations, Kan reveals the eerie details of the trivial and mundane objects, gestures, and emotions captured by her camera. Recently, Kan has explored more historical subject matters, embarking on extensive travel and research to create such video installations as Millet Mounds (2012), which surveys over one hundred extant imperial tombs across mainland China. She has participated in numerous international exhibitions—including the Guangzhou Triennial (2005 and 2012), Havana Biennial (2006), Chinese Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2007), Istanbul Biennial (2007), Moscow Biennial (2009), Gwangju Biennial (2010)—making her one of the most important global artists of her generation. Kan splits her time between Beijing and Amsterdam.
Sun Xun (b. 1980, Fuxin, Liaoning Province)
Born in an industrial mining town in northeast China, Sun Xun studied printmaking at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou. His interest in traditional modes of representation, such as ink painting and woodcut printing, is reflected in the deft craftsmanship of his animated films. Energetic and hand-drawn, his films are composed of up to five thousand single frames. Large-scale viewing environments are an integral experiential component of his work, replete with props and hand-painted walls. The artist often constructs these environments over several days. Layered with metaphors and references, Sun’s work unravels concepts such as time, history, revolution, myth, and humanity through surreal imageries and fantastical episodes. In addition to being featured in art exhibitions, his films have been screened at numerous film festivals, including the Torino Film Festival, Italy (2007), and several iterations of the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany. Sun runs Pi, an animation studio he founded in Hangzhou in 2006. He lives and works in Beijing.
Sun Yuan (b. 1972, Beijing) & Peng Yu (b. 1974, Jiamusi, Heilongjiang Province)
Sun Yuan and Peng Yu both studied oil painting at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing. They came to prominence independently in the late 1990s, partaking in landmark exhibitions of experimental art, including Post-Sense Sensibility: Alien Bodies & DelusionBeijing (1999), and Fuck Off!, Donglang Gallery, Shanghai (2000). Collaborators since 2000, the duo have incorporated unconventional and organic materials, such as live animals and human fat, into their powerful art practice that challenges the order and control imposed by political and social systems. Sun & Peng draw inspiration not only from major international social and political events, but also from local news, close friends, and neighbors. Their practice is rebellious and whimsical, addressing provocative topics with a touch of humor and a very individual brand of realism. The duo also curates occasionally; they co-organized the exhibition Unlived by What is Seen (2014–15), which spanned three venues in Beijing and focused on socially engaged art in China since 2008. In 2005, Sun & Peng were invited to be part of the inaugural exhibition in the Chinese Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. They live and work in Beijing.
Tsang Kin-Wah (b. 1976, Shantou, Guangdong Province)
Tsang Kin-Wah migrated to Hong Kong at the age of six. After completing his undergraduate degree in fine art the Chinese University of Hong Kong, he moved to London for a master’s degree in book arts at the Camberwell College of Arts, the London Institute. This sojourn in the United Kingdom and his subsequent return to Hong Kong—where Tsang has since resided—propelled him to ruminate on questions of identity and existence, especially the interplay between appearance and truth. Tsang has participated in major international group exhibitions and biennials, for which he has created installations that respond specifically to each space. Tsang’s immersive multimedia installations incorporate found footage, sound, and light to create complex, visceral interplays of text and image. As the Hong Kong representative at the Venice Biennale in 2015, he presented The Infinite Nothing, a four-part video and sound installation.
Yangjiang Group (est. 2002, Yangjiang, Guangdong Province)
Yangjiang Group was formed by Zheng Guogu (b. 1970, Yangjiang), Chen Zaiyan (b. 1971, Yangchun) and Sun Qinglin (b. 1974, Yangjiang), and takes its name from the southern coastal city where they are based. Positioning themselves away from the better-known cultural, economic, and political centers, they work in a self-designed studio building that resembles an iceberg. Such critical distance allows them to create an autonomous zone, cultivating an independent spirit and approach in pursuit of political and social freedom through art practice. Known for playfully attacking traditional Chinese calligraphy and subverting socio-cultural conventions and values, the group produces works in many mediums, such as painting, multimedia installation, performance, and social gatherings. Ordinary events and activities, such as eating, gambling, soccer playing, and tea drinking, are vital to their convivial working process and community-based exhibition experience. By framing aspects of everyday life as art, Yangjiang Group poetically and subtly resists established assumptions and hierarchies of power.
Zhou Tao (b. 1976, Changsha, Hunan Province)
Zhou Tao studied at the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. Places and communities in massive flux provide the visual and narrative materials for his arresting video works, which are often presented in exhibitions alongside his sketches, drawings, and photographs. His practice includes transforming ordinary surroundings into theaters, where he superimposes and interchanges background and stage, viewer and actor, fact and storyline, documentation and representation. The intricate relationship of time and space unfolds organically in Zhou’s videos. His camera is not simply a recording device but an extension of his existence, through which, he has documented Guangzhou, where he lives and works, as well as New York, Paris, Bangkok, and Barcelona. Zhou’s acclaimed short film Blue and Red (2014)—which was produced by the Han Nefkens Foundation, Barcelona, and Bangkok Art and Culture Centre—premiered in 2015 at New Directors/New Films, a festival presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Blue and Red recently won the First Prize of the Jury at the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany (2015).
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation
Established in Hong Kong in 2005 by Robert Hung Ngai Ho as a private philanthropic organization, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation works to foster and support Chinese arts and culture and to promote a deeper understanding of Buddhist teachings and their application in everyday life. The Foundation supports efforts that make traditional Chinese arts accessible and relevant to audiences worldwide. The Foundation also supports the creation of new works that bring innovative perspectives to the history of Chinese art, and that improve the quality and accessibility of scholarship on Chinese art. Guided by a belief that the insights of Buddhism have a vital role to play in approaching the challenges facing contemporary society, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation has committed substantial resources to expanding the understanding, interpretation, and application of Buddhist philosophy.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.

Guggenheim Receives $3 Million Challenge Grant for Art Conservation

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Guggenheim Museum Receives $3 Million Challenge Grant for Art Conservation from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Three-Year Challenge Grant to Endow Two Positions to Lead Innovative Research and Promote Public Engagement with Art
Download a PDF of this alert.
(NEW YORK, NY—March 18, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has received a $3 million endowment grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the continuing work of the museum’s Conservation Department. The grant, to be matched two-to-one, is designated specifically to endow the position of Deputy Director and Chief Conservator, held since 2007 by Carol Stringari, and a new position, Director of Engagement, Conservation and Collections. The announcement was made today by Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation.
“Carol Stringari and her conservation team are well known and highly regarded for their cutting-edge research, interdisciplinary perspective, and use of innovative techniques in advancing the field of conservation,” said Armstrong. “We commend The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its sustained commitment to the preservation of our cultural heritage, and we are grateful for its support of the Guggenheim’s work in this area. The endowment of these two positions will ensure our continued leadership in this vital area and enable the Guggenheim to create new programs to introduce its varied and fascinating conservation activities to the public.”
The Conservation Department—comprised of nine conservators who specialize in paintings, paper, time-based media, and objects of the late nineteenth century to the present—plays an integral role in the research, preservation, and presentation of the Guggenheim’s collection. The newly created position of Director of Engagement, Conservation and Collections is the first of its kind in the field. The director will further the work of the Guggenheim by supporting initiatives to make the museum’s collection and the role of art conservation more transparent and accessible to the public.
The Guggenheim conservation team works closely with colleagues at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao as well as with other arts professionals worldwide. They enable research and scholarship and train the next generation of conservators. Recent collaborations include an ongoing science program studying objects and sharing resources with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and an in-depth research project with the Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University through the NU-ACCESS program. As part of NU-ACCESS, participating institutions are conducting a thorough, collaborative study of Hungarian artist László Moholy-Nagy’s innovative materials and techniques. This research, which is generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, informed the curatorial planning of Moholy-Nagy: Future Present, on view at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, from May 27 through September 7, 2016, and will be published in exhibition’s accompanying catalogue.
A longtime pioneer in the field of contemporary art conservation, the Guggenheim established the Variable Media Initiative in 1999 to advance the preservation of media and performance-based works in its permanent collection. This initiative prompted a focus on the preservation of unconventional art forms that include conceptual, installation, performance, and time-based elements. In 2010 and 2013, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded the Panza Collection Initiative, a groundbreaking conservation and curatorial program designed to address the long-term preservation and future exhibition of the Guggenheim’s Panza Collection, which contains Minimalist, Post-Minimalist, and Conceptual artworks.
The Guggenheim’s commitment to illuminating the process of art conservation is reflected particularly in two past exhibitions organized by Carol Stringari. In 2008, the exhibition Imageless: The Scientific Study and Experimental Treatment of an Ad Reinhardt Black Painting introduced the conservator as forensic scientist, working with a group of experts to uncover the mystery hidden beneath the monochromatic painting’s surface. The 2004 exhibitionSeeing Double: Emulation in Theory and Practice displayed various strategies for preserving digital art, working closely with artists to determine parameters for change.
The recently established Conserving Computer-Based Art project, the first program focusing on this subject, aims to develop, implement, and disseminate best practices for the acquisition, preservation, maintenance, and display of computer-based art. The Guggenheim is one of the few institutions in the United States with a dedicated staff and facility for the conservation of art created through time-based media, such as video, film, slide, and audio, or computer-based technologies. The conservation team also serves to mentor and train interns and fellows and functions as a think tank and laboratory for New York University computer science students.
In an effort to stimulate and contribute to the ongoing dialogue with contemporary artists, writers, architects, curators, and scientists, the Guggenheim conservation staff continues to publish and educate, participate in and host symposia, and lecture at conferences and forums around the world.
About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies. To this end, it supports exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. The Foundation makes grants in five core program areas: Higher Education and Scholarship in the Humanities; Arts and Cultural Heritage; Diversity; Scholarly Communications; and International Higher Education and Strategic Projects.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.

YEAR OF THE MONKEY: 
News from the new China Institute



Dear Friends and Supporters of China Institute,
As we gear up to welcome the Year of the Monkey, I am pleased to share with you a brief summary of China Institute's recent activities and accomplishments.

This has been a pivotal, and in many ways, transformational year for China Institute. We moved to Lower Manhattan and are creating a brand-new flagship facility, accompanied by an expansion of programs and services designed to meet an ever growing demand of enthusiasts eager to know more about 'all things China'.

We are also approaching several significant milestones, including the 90th Anniversary of our establishment; the 50th Anniversary of the Gallery; and, the 10th year of the Confucius Institute. We will officially mark these milestones in Sept 2016 at the Grand Opening of our new facility and our inaugural Gallery Exhibition: 'Art in the time of Chaos: Masterworks from Six Dynasties China'.

The Year of the Sheep saw the CI calendar come alive, bursting with activities and programs across the three pillars for which we are known: Education, Business, Art and Culture. These programs include: language and culture classes for adults, children and educators; art exhibitions, and related public programing; business programs, including the China Impact Speaker Series; film series; author talks; culinary programs and the Gourmet Circle; family and holiday events; the Confucius Institute at CI; immersion trips to China and much more. . .

Details of our offerings can be found on our newly re-designed website: www.chinainstitute.org. Note: While China Institute has moved to the financial district, we maintain a presence on the Upper East Side with a satellite location at 151 East 65th Street, one block from our former home.

As the oldest and most prominent non-profit organization of our kind in New York, it was a special recognition and acknowledgement to be one of the key organizations to officially welcome President Xi Jinping and First Lady Peng Liyuan at a dinner in Seattle on the first stop of their State Visit to the US in Sept 2015. With the rising importance of China, and its relationship with the U.S. and the rest of the globe, our mission is more relevant and necessary, than ever before. I will continue to work to educate people in the US about China, to enhance trust through deeper cross-cultural understanding, and to make China Institute an even more dynamic 'gateway to China' for a new generation of global citizens.

Wishing you and your family Health Happiness and Prosperity for the Year of the Monkey. 

James B. Heimowitz 
President

P.S. Please check out our February eNewsletter 

100 Washington Street, New York, NY 10006
China Institute, 100 Washington Street, Entrance @ 40 Rector Street,2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006

Guggenheim Presents Contemporary Art from the Middle East and North Africa


But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise, a Presentation of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, Opens April 29 in New York and Travels to Istanbul in 2017
Exhibition:But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa
Venue:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location:Tower 4, Thannhauser 4, Monitor 4 Galleries, and Tower 5
Dates:April 29–October 5, 2016
Download a PDF of this release. Translations in Arabic, Farsi, French, Hebrew, and Turkish are forthcoming.
(NEW YORK, NY—January 28, 2016)—From April 29 to October 5, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York will present But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise, the third exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. Organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, the exhibition will feature work by a broad selection of artists that illuminates contemporary creative practice in the region and its diaspora. Following its presentation in New York, the exhibition will travel to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017.
The assembled works investigate narratives of origin, ideologies of architecture, and the politics of migration throughout the Middle East and North Africa, as embodied by But a storm is blowing from paradise, a 2014 work by Rokni Haerizadeh that lends the exhibition its title. Sourced from news media, this series of works on paper examines the viral capacity of digital communications, articulated through the visual entanglement of politics and fable.
Installed on two levels of the museum, the exhibition features a selection of works, many of them installations of large or variable scale, in a range of mediums and formats including painting, photography, sculpture, video, and work on paper. Abbas Akhavan’s Study for a Monument (2013–15), which is comprised of intricate cast bronze flora specimens arranged on domestic cotton sheets and resembling a funerary display, occupies the floor by windows that overlook Central Park. Other works represent striking interventions into the museum’s galleries. These include Kader Attia’s Untitled (Ghardaïa) (2009), a reincarnation in couscous of the Algerian city from the ancient Mzab region that inspired influential French architect Le Corbusier. Nadia Kaabi-Linke’s monumental Flying Carpets (2011), a suspended stainless steel grid that casts a matrix of geometric shadows, is modeled after a central bridge in Venice where undocumented migrant street vendors of mainly African, Arab, and South Asian origin sell counterfeit goods on rugs to tourists.
According to Raza, “The exhibition forms an intricate jigsaw puzzle, representing a fragmented and shifting geographical region. With a cross-circulation of current ideas drawn from science, mathematics, and philosophy as they were developed in the area, and references to geometry as a metaphor for both physical and conceptual space, the works explore how the past informs the present. This confluence of narratives thus ‘smuggles’ certain inconvenient truths about history and memory into the realm of the exhibition, articulating the value of artistic strategies within the broader context of contemporary culture in the Middle East and North Africa.”
As with all phases of the MAP initiative, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradisefeatures artworks that have been recently acquired for the Guggenheim’s permanent collection under the auspices of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund. Curatorial research for the exhibition was developed with an eye toward building on the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism, as well as providing new scholarship on visual culture from the Middle East and North Africa and its diaspora.
Artists represented in the exhibition include, with additional artists to be announced:
Abbas Akhavan (b. 1977, Tehran, Iran; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)
Kader Attia (b. 1970, Paris, France; lives and works in Berlin, Germany)
Ergin Çavuşoğlu (b. 1968, Targovishte, Bulgaria; lives and works in London, UK)
Mariam Ghani (b. 1978, New York, USA; lives and works in New York, USA)
Rokni Haerizadeh (b. 1978, Tehran, Iran; lives and works in Dubai, UAE)
Susan Hefuna (b. 1962, Cairo, Egypt; lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany)
Iman Issa (b. 1979, Cairo, Egypt; lives and works in New York, USA)
Nadia Kaabi-Linke (b. 1978, Tunis, Tunisia; lives and works in Berlin, Germany)
Mohammed Kazem (b. 1969, Dubai, UAE; lives and works in Dubai, UAE)
Ahmed Mater (b. 1979, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia; lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)
Ala Younis (b. 1974, Kuwait; lives and works in Amman, Jordan)
MAP Highlights
Developed with the financial services firm UBS in 2012 to increase exposure and access to contemporary art from the culturally dynamic regions of South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa, the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative builds upon and reflects the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism and UBS’s commitment to direct engagement with contemporary art and education.
The first MAP exhibition, No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, was organized by June Yap and presented at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center and the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore following its New York debut in 2013. The second exhibition, Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today (Bajo un mismo sol: Arte de América Latina hoy), is organized by Pablo León de la Barra and on view at Museo Jumex in Mexico City through February 7, 2016; it will be presented at the South London Gallery in June 2016.
To date, MAP’s acquisitions program has brought more than 107 works by 85 artists and collectives into the Guggenheim’s permanent collection. More than 7,000 students, teachers, families, and art enthusiasts have participated in over 80 interactive education programs, developed jointly by the Guggenheim and its institutional partners across the world specifically for local audiences. In addition, MAP’s website at guggenheim.org/MAP offers a wealth of content, including videos by artists and curators, artist profilesblog posts by international curators and critics, and interactive learning tools.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.
About Pera Museum
Pera Museum was established by Suna and Ínan Kıraç Foundation in 2005. Located in the historic Tepebaşı quarter of the city; the museum’s building, once the famous Bristol Hotel, has been transformed into an impressive new site of galleries housing both the Foundation’s permanent collection along with a program of national and international temporary exhibitions. As a modern cultural center in a vibrant part of the city, the museum also aims to provide its visitors with a broad range of cultural events that include diverse, temporary exhibitions as well as educational, film, conference and music programs.peramuseum.org
About UBS and Contemporary Art
UBS’s long and substantial record of patronage in contemporary art actively enables clients and audiences to participate in the international conversation about art and the global art market through the firm’s contemporary art platform. In addition to the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, UBS’s extensive roster of contemporary art initiatives and programs currently includes: the UBS Art Collection, one of the world’s largest and most important corporate collections of contemporary art and the firm’s long-term support for the premier international Art Basel shows in Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong, for which UBS serves as global Lead Partner. These activities are complemented by a number of regional partnerships with fine art institutions including the Fondation Beyeler in Switzerland, Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan, the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. UBS also provides its clients with insight into the contemporary art world through the new and free iPad and iPhone app Planet Art, the UBS Art Competence Center, and the UBS Arts Forum. For more information about UBS’s commitment to contemporary art, visit ubs.com/art.

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THE GUGGENHEIM JOINS THE GOOGLE CULTURAL INSTITUTE TO EXPAND GLOBAL ACCESS TO THE MUSEUM'S LANDMARK FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT-DESIGNED ARCHITECTURE AND PERMANENT COLLECTION
(NEW YORK, NY—January 22, 2016)—Online visitors from around the world can now explore the interior of the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum through Google Street View technology. Additionally, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, in collaboration with the Google Cultural Institute, has made available over 120 artworks from its collection for online viewing. 



January 22, 2016

Photo: David Heald, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York
The Harvard Art Museums Present Everywhen: The
Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia
Tommy Watson, Wipu Rockhole, 2004. Synthetic poly- mer paint on canvas. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Purchased with funds provided by the Aborig- inal Collection Benefactors’ Group 2004, 256.2004.
© Tommy Watson. Courtesy of Yanda Aboriginal Art. November 12, 2015 (updated January 14, 2016)
The Harvard Art Museums present Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia, on display in the museums’ Special Exhibitions Gallery from February 5 through September 18, 2016.
The exhibition has been guest curated for the Harvard Art Museums by Indigenous Australian Stephen Gilchrist, of the Yamatji people of the Inggarda language group of Western Australia. Gilchrist has shaped the exhibition to ensure that it centers around the authentic perspectives and experiences of Indigenous people from Australia. The exhibition takes its title from the concept of “the Everywhen,” a term coined by Australian anthropologist William Stanner in the 1960s to describe his comprehension of Indigenous people’s understanding of time, which is conceptualized as part of a cyclical and circular
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order where past, present, and future are intertwined. As explained by Pitjantjatjara artist Tommy Watson, whose work Wipu Rockhole (2004) is included in the exhibition, “Our paintings are our memories for the future relatives.”
“The central idea of the exhibition is time,” said Gilchrist, the Australian Studies Visiting Curator at the Harvard Art Museums and associate lecturer in art history at the University of Sydney, Australia. “Everyone can relate to time; artists across the globe and across centuries have responded to the task of thinking about time and its promise, presentness, and passing. But this exhibition asks people to think about time from an Indigenous perspective, to consider how it is marked, observed, and sensed.”
While Indigenous art has at times been viewed by the international community as a relic of the past, the exhibition argues that Indigenous art and culture is equally invested in the past, present, and future. The exhibition asks visitors to consider Indigenous art as sophisticated, contemporary, and “of our time.” The exhibition also asks visitors to explore the underlying issues and experiences of the artists. While art has served as a customary medium for Indigenous people to pass on cultural practices, it has also provided a crucial public platform for Indigenous people. Through their works, Indigenous artists visualize ancient narratives, and also their experiences with colonial oppression, philosophies of ecological sustainability, interventions within museum collections, and the necessity of engaged political activism.
The exhibition features more than 70 works of varying scale and media, with the majority produced over the past 40 years. Drawn from public and private collections in Australia and the United States, many of the works have never been seen outside Australia. The exhibition is organized around four interrelated themes—Seasonality, Transformation, Performance, and Remembrance—all of which are central to Indigenous art and culture.
Works by some of the most significant contemporary Indigenous artists will be on view, including Rover Thomas (c. 1926–1998) and Emily Kam Kngwarray (c. 1910–1996), who both exhibited at the Venice Biennale; Judy Watson (b. 1959), recipient of the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award; Doreen Reid Nakamarra (c. 1955–2009), who participated in dOCUMENTA (13); Vernon Ah Kee (b. 1967), who has also exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and most recently, the Istanbul Biennial; and the visual and performance artist Christian Thompson (b. 1978), who was recently mentored by Marina Abramoviin Australia.
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Everywhen asks important and nuanced questions about the agency of contemporary Indigenous artists and how their works are situated within today’s global society,” said Deborah Martin Kao, the Landon and Lavinia Clay Chief Curator and interim co-director of the Harvard Art Museums.
In addition to the extraordinary works of contemporary art, which are realized in a wide array of media, from paintings on bark to video, the exhibition also makes a place for historical objects from Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The inclusion of these customary objects, such as coolamons (multipurpose carrying vessels, sometimes used to cradle babies), baskets for food gathering, and larrakitj (hollow log coffins), is to demonstrate how a life is lived, measured and made meaningful through cultural objects. While the names of the makers of these objects were rarely recorded by collectors, they nonetheless possess the tangible, human residue of their makers. The exhibition invites audiences to consider the histories of erasure in past museum displays and collecting practices that have marginalized, silenced, and dehumanized Indigenous people. The exhibition also speaks to the new politics of display that are symbolically reuniting objects to their source communities where possible.
“By including these objects, we are also trying to break down the divisions between art history and anthropology,” said Gilchrist. “For Indigenous people, art and culture are both software and hardware; they need to be seen and understood together.”
Works on Display
Approximately 10 to 15 works of art will be showcased in each of the four thematic sections that make up the exhibition.
Seasonality: Forty thousand years of living culture on the continent of Australia has provided Indigenous people from Australia with a sensitive understanding of ecological patterns and celestial movements. In many parts of Australia, the solar year is regularly divided into six to eight discrete seasons, with these punctuating changes often understood as manifestations of ancestral presence. Works of art in this section explore what it means to be responsive to the natural world. They invite the viewer to observe environmental transitions and consider larger issues that shape the current cultural landscape: how we have denaturalized our relationship to the natural world, the impact of global climate change, and the ways we can re-energize our interconnectedness with the world around us. Works on display include two examples of Wanjina (c. 1980) by Alec Mingelmanganu (1905–1981); Yari country (1989), a painting by Rover Thomas (c. 1926–1998); Emily Kam Kngwarray’s (c. 1910–1996) four- panel painting Anwerlarr angerr (Big Yam) from 1996; Judy Watson’s (b. 1959) painting bunya, from
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2011; as well as three contemporary wood larrakitj, or hollow log coffins, by Yolngu artists Djambawa Marawili (b. 1953), Yumutjin Wunungmurra (b. 1953), and Djirrirra Wunungmurra (b. 1968), on loan from the Hood Museum of Art.
Transformation: The narratives told and retold by Indigenous people explain the origins of the natural world and often feature the travels of shape-shifting ancestors who metamorphosed into features of the landscape, vesting them with their sacred power. Indigenous artists create and re-create these narratives, and the sacred and significant sites associated with them, to canonize their spiritual ancestors and to re-energize their personal and cultural connection to them. The theme of transformation also applies more broadly to Indigenous art and culture, which is reimagined and reconstituted by those who create and live it. While many people erroneously associate Indigenous art and culture as being about the past, the works in this section emphasize that Indigenous people have always and continue to embrace adaptive and innovative practices. Works on display include Tommy Watson’s (born c. 1932) painting Wipu Rockhole (2004); Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s (born c. 1932) Two Women Dreaming (1990); and Manydjarri Ganambarr’s (born c. 1952) poetic bark painting Djambarrpuyngu märna (1996).
Performance: The ceremonies that Indigenous people attend and participate in are used by some Indigenous artists as the source iconography in their art. While Indigenous people continue to face ongoing challenges relating to the maintenance of cultural practice, ceremonial practices are often invoked in part by artists in the creation of their art. In a sense, art making has become a new medium of performance and the rhythm of ceremony resonates in sculptures, painted objects, and photographs. Works on display in this section include Doreen Reid Nakamarra’s (c. 1955–2009) large painting Untitled (2007), composed of thousands of small dots evoking the innumerable grains of sand that make up her desert country, as well as the rhythm and mindfulness of ceremonial performance; The Burala Rite (1972), a bark painting by Tom Djawa (1905–1980); and two woven baskets on loan from Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.
Remembrance: Creating works of art that resonate with cultural memory, the artists in this section critically reflect on history and how it configures the present. The works invite visitors to consider what we choose to remember and what, and who, we are forced to forget. Serving the exhibition’s interest in the multilayered concept of the Everywhen, these works of art highlight how we carry the past within. Through artistic excursions into the past, personal memories, national histories, and practices captured in the collections of museums can be confronted, interrogated, and sometimes laid to rest. Works on display include Vernon Ah Kee’s (b. 1967) many lies (2004), a text-based vinyl work applied directly to
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the gallery wall; Julie Gough’s (b. 1965) Dark Valley, Van Diemen’s Land (2008), a “necklace” that hangs in the shape of Tasmania and is composed of Tasmanian coal; and three photographs from Christian Thompson’s (b. 1978) We Bury Our Own series from 2012, his response to the Australian photographic collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.
The artists in this exhibition demonstrate how Indigenous people can be both couriers and keepers of what has been, what is, and what will be. Their compelling visual statements condense a wealth of cultural, ritual, ecological, and historical information that undermines the discourse that relegates Indigenous people to history. The themes of the exhibition—Seasonality, Transformation, Performance, and Remembrance—reflect an experience of time that is active, abiding, and expansive. The Everywhen can show us that Indigenous art and culture do not merely represent the time before time, but in fact awaken us to the fullness of it.
Conservation Research
As part of the research and preparation for the exhibition, conservation scientists in the Harvard Art Museums’ Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies launched the first ever large-scale technical examination of Indigenous Australian bark paintings, including historic objects that served as short-term shelters in wet weather. It was commonly thought that Indigenous artists would not have used binders, but after three years, two hundred samples, and analysis of fifty paintings, there is scientific evidence to challenge that view. The team found the first conclusive evidence that orchid juice was used as a binder in two of the oldest known bark paintings, dating to the late 19th century.
“For the first time, we are able to provide physical evidence to support or challenge theories from the past about the type and presence of binders in bark paintings,” said Australian Narayan Khandekar, senior conservation scientist and director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies.
Khandekar and his team also uncovered more information about where Indigenous artists sourced their pigments. Traditional bark painting from Arnhem Land in the far north of Australia uses only four colors—yellow, white, red, and black—derived primarily from minerals. The team analyzed and mapped the elemental composition of pigments from historic bark paintings and then compared those pigments to ochres (earthen pigments) that the team had collected while visiting Indigenous art centers in Australia and conducting artist interviews. These findings will be added to an informal “atlas” of all Australian pigment sources, contributing to a greater understanding of the extensive ochre trade among Indigenous Australians. On Groote Eylandt, an area with abundant manganese deposits, they found
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that the artists used naturally occurring black as well as black from dry cell batteries and from charcoal, indicating a nuanced choice of material.
About the Curator
Stephen Gilchrist, from the Yamatji people of the Inggarda language group from Western Australia, has curated exhibitions in Australia and the United States and has written extensively on Indigenous art from Australia. He is a leading voice in Indigenous modes of curation as a form of social practice and cultural activism. Gilchrist is currently the Australian Studies Visiting Curator at the Harvard Art Museums and associate lecturer in art history at the University of Sydney, Australia.
Over the past decade, Gilchrist has made significant contributions to the field through his work with the Indigenous Australian collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the British Museum, London; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; and the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire. He has written and contributed to important publications about Aboriginal art, including Ancestral Modern: Australian Aboriginal Art (2012) and Crossing Cultures: The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art at the Hood Museum of Art (2011). In addition, Gilchrist is on the international advisory board acting as an attaché for the 2016 Sydney Biennale.
Programming
Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia will open with a free public celebration on Thursday, February 4, 2016. This event features a discussion at 6pm about the exhibition’s central themes between curator Stephen Gilchrist and Vernon Ah Kee, one of the artists featured in the exhibition, and includes open hours in the exhibition and in all other museum galleries beginning at 5pm. A celebratory reception in the Calderwood Courtyard follows the discussion.
During the course of the exhibition, there will be lectures, including one on March 23, 2016, by Michael D. Jackson, Distinguished Visiting Professor of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. Jackson will discuss the work of Paddy Nelson Jupurrula, one of the preeminent Warlpiri artists of the Western Desert painting movement. Christian Thompson, a Bidjara artist from Queensland featured in the exhibition, will also give a lecture in the spring (details forthcoming). Events also include dance and music performances, weekly film screenings, biweekly gallery talks, and Materials Lab workshops on earth-based pigments and clay. There will also be public conversations on curatorial practice and indigeneity, as well as programmatic collaborations with Harvard University campus organizations,
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academic departments, and research centers. Detailed information about programs can be found at harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar.
Catalogue
The exhibition catalogue, published by the Harvard Art Museums and distributed by Yale University Press, will be available in February 2016. Including images of the works on display and six essays by distinguished scholars, the publication delves more deeply into the concepts proposed in the exhibition, offering a lasting look at Indigenous Australian art and paying homage to the particular traditions of specific regions of Australia. Edited by Stephen Gilchrist, the catalogue features essays by Gilchrist; Hetti Perkins, one of Australia’s most respected curators of Aboriginal art and daughter of Indigenous activist Charles Perkins; Henry F. Skerritt, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh; and Fred Myers, professor of anthropology at New York University, among others. The catalogue will be available for purchase in the Harvard Art Museums shop, located adjacent to the Calderwood Courtyard on Level 1. To inquire about ordering, visit shop.harvardartmuseums.org, call 617-495-1440, or email am_shop@harvard.edu. To request a copy for review, contact Jennifer Aubin in the museums’ Communications Division at jennifer_aubin@harvard.edu or 617-496-5331.
Acknowledgments and Credits
In Australia, special events are often opened with a Welcome to Country or Acknowledgement of Country statement to show respect to the traditional custodians of the land. To reflect that tradition here in the United States, the Harvard Art Museums, in opening this exhibition, recognize the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), along with the Nipmuc Nation and the Massachusett people, on whose land the museums stand today.
Lead support for Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia and related research has been provided by the Harvard Committee on Australian Studies. The exhibition is supported by the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Australian Consulate-General, New York. Additional support for the exhibition, catalogue, and related research has been provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, John and Barbara Wilkerson, the American Friends of the National Gallery of Australia, Debra and Dennis Scholl, the William E. Teel African and Oceanic Arts Endowment, the Dimitri Hadzi Memorial Fund for Modern Art, and the Harvard Art Museums Mellon Publication Funds, including the Henry P. McIlhenny Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.
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Lenders include: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Lyn and Rob Backwell, Melbourne; Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Margaret Levi and Robert Kaplan; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Milani Gallery, Brisbane; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; National Museum of Australia, Canberra; Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; John and Barbara Wilkerson; and two anonymous lenders. 


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SPRING 2016 PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM 

In conjunction with the exhibitions Photo-Poetics: An Anthology and Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and the Sixth Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture.

Jump to: Photo-Poetics Programs | Fischli Weiss Programs | Mind’s Eye | Curators’ Eye Tours |Rosenblum Lecture | Drawing the Guggenheim
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PHOTO-POETICS: AN ANTHOLOGY PROGRAMS

Artist Panels
Wednesdays, 6:30 pm

In a series of panels, the artists featured in Photo-Poetics discuss their exhibited work and participate in a group conversation addressing themes related to photographic practices today, including issues of identity, representation, reproduction, and the circulation of images in contemporary visual culture. These discussions are part of the Elaine Terner Cooper Education Fund Conversations with Contemporary Artists series.

January 27: Lisa Oppenheim and Sara VanDerBeek

February 24: Elad Lassry, Erin Shirreff, and Kathrin Sonntag

March 9: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, and Moyra Davey

$15, $10 members, $5 other museum staff, free for students with RSVP, and includes an exhibition viewing and reception. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/cca.
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PETER FISCHLI DAVID WEISS: HOW TO WORK BETTER PROGRAMS

Film Screenings: The Least Resistance and The Right Way
Fridays–Wednesdays, February 5–April 20, 11 am, 12:30 pm, 2 pm, 3:30 pm

Two films follow Rat and Bear, the iconic alter egos of Peter Fischli and David Weiss, as they set out to strike it rich in the Los Angeles art world (The Least Resistance, 1980–81, 29 min.) and wander aimlessly through a bucolic mountainside landscape (The Right Way, 1983, 55 min.).

Free with museum admission. Screening times subject to change. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/filmscreenings.

Peter Fischli in Conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist
Sunday, February 7, 4:30 pm
As part of the Elaine Terner Cooper Education Fund Conversations with Contemporary Artists series, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director of Exhibitions and Programmes, Serpentine Gallery, London, joins Peter Fischli to discuss his 33-year collaboration with the late David Weiss. This conversation will be the first between Fischli and Obrist to be held in New York City.

$15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP, and includes an exhibition viewing and reception. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/cca
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MIND’S EYE TOURS
Mondays, 6:30 pm
For visitors who are blind or have low vision, tours and workshops focused on the Guggenheim’s exhibitions are presented through verbal descriptions and touch.

February 1: Kandinsky Gallery

April 4: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Free with RSVP. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/mindseye.
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CURATOR’S EYE TOURS
Fridays, 12 pm
Public gallery tours of the museum’s spring exhibitions led by Guggenheim Museum curators.

February 12: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and David and Jennifer Stockman Chief Curator

February 26*: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology
Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography

March 11: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology
Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator

March 25*: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media

April 8: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Anne Wheeler, Assistant Curator

Free with museum admission. *Tours will be interpreted in American Sign Language. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
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SIXTH ANNUAL ROBERT ROSENBLUM LECTURE
Huey Copeland: Solar EthicsMonday, April 4, 6:30 pm
Since his death in 1993, the musician, writer, and composer Sun Ra has become a touchstone for many cultural producers. Huey Copeland, Associate Professor of Art History, Northwestern University, explores how Ra’s thinking points us toward new criteria for recent art that takes seriously both the recursiveness and simultaneity of time as it unfolds within and beyond the black community. The lecture is followed by a reception.

Free with RSVP. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
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DRAWING THE GUGGENHEIM
Saturday, April 16, 10 am–1 pm
Led by Guggenheim educator Sharon Vatsky, this workshop uses drawing to study the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright building and develop a deeper understanding of the architecture. No drawing experience required.

$20 (includes materials), $15 members. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

Major Retrospective of László Moholy-Nagy Opens at the 

Guggenheim on May 27, 2016




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Major Retrospective of László Moholy-Nagy Opens at the Guggenheim Museum in New York on May 27, 2016, and Travels to Chicago and Los Angeles

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

View a PDF of the release.
(NEW YORK, NY, January 4, 2016)— From May 27 to September 7, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present the first comprehensive retrospective in nearly fifty years of the work of pioneering artist and educator László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946). Organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Moholy-Nagy: Future Present examines the full career of the utopian modernist who believed in the power of art and technology as a vehicle for social transformation and the betterment of humanity. Despite Moholy-Nagy’s prominence and the visibility of his work during his lifetime, few exhibitions have conveyed his experimental engagement, enthusiasm for industrial materials, and his radical innovations with movement and light. This long overdue presentation, which encompasses his multidisciplinary methodology, brings together more than 300 works drawn from public and private collections across Europe and the United States, some of which have never before been shown publicly in this country.
Each of the three organizing institutions has a history of collecting and presenting the artist’s works or a relationship to the interaction of art and technology, culminating in a comprehensive exhibition, innovative conservation efforts, and a scholarly exhibition catalogue examining Moholy-Nagy’s practice and influence. After its debut presentation in New York, the exhibition will be on view in Chicago from October 2, 2016–January 3, 2017, and in Los Angeles from February 12–June 18, 2017.
Moholy-Nagy: Future Present provides an opportunity to examine the full career of this influential Bauhaus teacher, founder of Chicago’s Institute of Design, and versatile artist who paved the way for increasingly interdisciplinary and multimedia work and practice. Among his radical innovations were experimenting with cameraless photography; using industrial materials in painting and sculpture; researching with light, transparency, and movement; working at the forefront of abstraction; and moving fluidly between the fine and applied arts. The exhibition features collages, drawings, ephemera, films, paintings, photograms, photographs, photomontages, and sculptures, underscoring a legacy of cross-disciplinary experimentation and a remarkable ability to work across mediums. As part of the exhibition, a contemporary fabrication of a space originally conceived by Moholy-Nagy in 1930, Room of the Present, will be on display at all three venues, for the first time in the United States. The space, which was not realized in Moholy-Nagy’s lifetime, contains aspects of the artist’s exhibition and product design, including a replica of his iconic kinetic Light Prop for an Electric Stage (1929–30). Room of the Presentillustrates the artist’s belief in the power of images and his approach to the various means with which to view them—a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.
Born in 1895 in Austria-Hungary (now southern Hungary), Moholy-Nagy moved to Vienna briefly and then to Berlin in 1920, where he encountered Dada artists, Russian Constructivists, and Galerie Der Sturm, where he exhibited work on several occasions. After teaching at the Bauhaus in Weimar and then Dessau in the 1920s, producing books and painting extensively across mediums, he enjoyed success in Berlin as a commercial artist, exhibition and stage designer, and typographer. Adolf Hitler’s rise to power made life increasingly difficult for the avant-garde in Germany; thus in 1934 Moholy-Nagy moved with his family to the Netherlands and then to London. Once he moved to Chicago in 1937, he never returned to Europe. In the United States, he focused on opening a school of design and made some of his most original and experimental work. He gave his full attention to American exhibition venues, showing nearly three dozen times across the United States—including in four solo shows—before his premature death from leukemia in November 1946. His interdisciplinary and investigative approach, migrating from the school to the museum or gallery space, pushed towards what he referred to as the Gesamtwerk, the total work for which he searched throughout his life.
Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Karole P. B. Vail, Associate Curator, is the Guggenheim’s organizing curator for the exhibition.
The New York presentation of Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is made possible by Lavazza. Funding is generously provided by the David Berg Foundation, The Hilla von Rebay Foundation, the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, and the Robert Lehman Foundation. The Leadership Committee for the exhibition, chaired by Peter and Dede Lawson-Johnston, is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Achim Moeller. Additional funding is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.
PRESS CONTACTS:

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Sarah Eaton | Director of Media and Public Relations | 212 423 3840 |pressoffice@guggenheim.org
Kris Parker | Senior Publicist | 212 423 3840 | pressoffice@guggenheim.org

The Art Institute of Chicago
Amanda Hicks | Director of Public Affairs| 312 443 7297 | ahicks@artic.edu

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
Miranda Carroll | Communications Director | 323 857 6543 | mcarroll@lacma.org
Jessica Youn | Senior Communications Associate | 323 857 6515 |jyoun@lacma.org
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
Location: 1071 5th Avenue (at 89th Street), New York, NY 10128 | 212 423 3500 | www.guggenheim.org
About the Art Institute of Chicago: The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879, is a world-renowned art museum housing one of the largest permanent collections in the United States. An encyclopedic museum, the Art Institute collects, preserves, and interprets works in every medium from all cultures and historical periods. With a collection of approximately 300,000 art works and artifacts, the museum has particularly strong holdings in Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting, contemporary art, early 20th century European painting and sculpture, Japanese prints, and photography. The museum’s 2009 addition, the Modern Wing, features the latest in green museum technology and 264,000 square feet dedicated to modern and contemporary art, photography, architecture and design, and new museum education facilities. In addition to displaying its permanent collection, the Art Institute mounts more than 30 special exhibitions per year and features lectures, gallery tours, and special performances on a daily basis.
Location: 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603 | 312 443 3600 |www.artic.edu
About LACMA: Since its inception in 1965, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has been devoted to collecting works of art that span both history and geography, in addition to representing Los Angeles's uniquely diverse population. Today LACMA is the largest art museum in the western United States, with a collection that includes nearly 130,000 objects dating from antiquity to the present, encompassing the geographic world and nearly the entire history of art. Among the museum’s strengths are its holdings of Asian art; Latin American art, ranging from masterpieces from the Ancient Americas to works by leading modern and contemporary artists; and Islamic art, of which LACMA hosts one of the most significant collections in the world. A museum of international stature as well as a vital part of Southern California, LACMA shares its vast collections through exhibitions, public programs, and research facilities that attract over one million visitors annually, in addition to serving millions through digital initiatives such as online collections, scholarly catalogues, and interactive engagement. LACMA is located in Hancock Park, 30 acres situated at the center of Los Angeles, which also contains the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum and the forthcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Situated halfway between the ocean and downtown, LACMA is at the heart of Los Angeles.
Location: 5905 Wilshire Boulevard (at Fairfax Avenue), Los Angeles, CA, 90036 | 323 857 6000 | lacma.org


Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East

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Boook cover showing photo pf Chiang Yee and Chiang's illustration of geese flying in formation
Professor Da Zheng's book is a cultural biography of Chiang Yee, whose illustration of geese in flight is part of the exhibit, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum.