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Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Celebrates the Opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence, Second Exhibition from The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection

ABU DHABI, March 7, 2017)Under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohamed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) celebrated today the opening of The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence at Manarat Al Saadiyat on Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi. Featuring works by more than 25 artists from different nationalities and generations, the exhibition explores the related themes of performance, process, and presence through a variety of mediums. Running until 29 July 2017, The Creative Act is the second major exhibition of works from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection.
HE Saif Saeed Ghobash, Director General of TCA Abu Dhabi, commented on the exhibition “The Creative Act offers a transcultural perspective on defining aspects of contemporary art by highlighting interconnections among artists working in various corners of the world since the 1960s. The works in the exhibition reveal common sources of inspiration, lines of influence, and distinctive contributions. Two commissions featured in the exhibition reflect the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi’s commitment to supporting the production of new work by living artists. This exhibition marks not only the next defining step for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, but also the establishment of the future museum’s role to encourage, inspire, and inform. Only through direct interaction with artworks, themes, creative professionals, and artists can we provide future generations with a fully rounded set of tools through which to understand the development of artistic expression.”
Three distinct yet interconnected themes of the exhibition—performance, process, and presence—provide a unifying framework for the exhibition, with many artists exploring more than one theme in the works on view:
Performance can be represented in several different forms: unfolding live in a given time and place, remaining afterward as recordings and documentations, or serving primarily as the means for creating discrete objects. The Creative Act features examples of live actions that constitute works in and of themselves and performative practices that result in drawings, paintings, sculptures, and videos. A selection of photographs document the renowned Emirati artist Hassan Sharif’s 1980s performances, which he realised in both London and Dubai. His conceptual, experimental, and performative practice greatly influenced the subsequent generation of artists in the United Arab Emirates, such as Mohammed Kazem, who is also featured in The Creative Act.
Many of the artworks offer insight into the process used to make them. A key work within this section is Anish Kapoor’s My Red Homeland (2003), a monumental sculptural installation composed of nearly twenty-five tonnes of red wax with a mechanical arm that circumnavigates the platform, continually altering the surface as it moves across the material. Works by pioneering 1960s experimental art practitioners including Rasheed AraeenJulio Le ParcNiki de Saint PhalleJean TinguelyGünther Uecker, and Jacques Villeglé, explore the process of creating with everyday materials and using performative techniques.
The theme of human presence is highlighted through artworks that involve the appearance of the artist or others in the works as well as visible traces of the physical acts undertaken to realize them. Paintings by artists affiliated with the Gutai Art Association (1954–72) including Motonaga SadamasaShiraga Kazuo, and Tanaka Atsuko epitomize these ideas. Video installations by Susan Hefuna and Anri Sala take the performing arts—dance and music respectively—and the theme of interpretation as points of departure. Autobiography (03-07) (2007), a series of forty photographs and a video, captures Emirati artist Ebtisam Abdulaziz’s performances in various public spaces in Sharjah and examines the often complex relationship between social and personal identities.
The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Ph.D., Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project; Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, Abu Dhabi Project; with Sarah Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Head of Programmes – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, commented: “The Creative Act brings into focus the complexity, poetry, and power of the human spirit. The exhibition also reflects our shared understanding of the vital necessity of global exchange that is at the heart of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi project. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is proud to be working with Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority to realize this exhibition that celebrates the considerable scholarship underpinning the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection and the catalytic potential of the future museum as a vital addition to the cultural landscape of the region and the world.”
In line with the commitment of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi to support original work by living artists, TCA Abu Dhabi has commissioned artists Hesam RahmanianRamin Haerizadeh, and Rokni Haerizadeh to create an installation inspired by the core themes of The Creative ActAnother Happy Day (2016–17) is a multiroom, immersive installation featuring artworks by the commissioned artists and others, which, like the selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, probe the nature of the creative artistic process while inviting visitors to become engaged and activated. This project, coupled with photographs by Tarek Al-Ghoussein, part of a series commissioned by TCA Abu Dhabi for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, offers a convergence of past, present, and future in our own time.
The Creative Act: Performance, Process, Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Curator and Manager of Curatorial Affairs, Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, with Sara Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Programmes Manager – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
About Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)
Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority conserves and promotes the heritage and culture of Abu Dhabi emirate and leverages them in the development of a world-class, sustainable destination of distinction, which enriches the lives of visitors and residents alike. The authority manages the emirate’s tourism sector and markets the destination internationally through a wide range of activities aimed at attracting visitors and investment. Its policies, plans and programmes relate to the preservation of heritage and culture, including protecting archaeological and historical sites and to developing museums, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. TCA Abu Dhabi supports intellectual and artistic activities and cultural events to nurture a rich cultural environment and honour the emirate’s heritage. A key authority role is to create synergy in the destination’s development through close co-ordination with its wide-ranging stakeholder base. http://tcaabudhabi.ae/en
About Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum will promote the understanding and appreciation of contemporary art, architecture, and other manifestations of modern and contemporary visual culture from an international perspective. A curatorial programme with a transcultural perspective on art and visual culture from the 1960s to the present will have a strong focus on art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia, exploring the specific identity derived from the cultural traditions of Abu Dhabi and the United Arab Emirates. The future museum, and its growing collection, is owned by the Government of Abu Dhabi. Surrounded almost entirely by water, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will have spectacular views of the Saadiyat Cultural District and the Arabian Gulf. Galleries, many unprecedented in scale, are distributed around the central atrium on four levels connected by glass bridges above. Open to the elements, the museum cones housing contemporary art commissions, recall the region’s ancient wind-towers, which both ventilate and shade the exterior courtyards in a fitting blend of Arabian tradition and modern design. The museum will also feature a 350-seat theatre, education workshops and classrooms, an onsite conservation lab, as well as a retail store, cafes, and a restaurant.
The museum will be a catalyst for scholarship in a variety of fields, chief among them the history of art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia in the 20th and 21st centuries. A dynamic programme of changing exhibitions will explore common themes and affinities among the work of artists across time and geography. An ambitious programme of commissions created for the collection and exceptional spaces of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will reinforce the museum’s commitment to working with artists and the art of our time.
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is being developed in collaboration with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationFounded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Appoints Nancy Spector to the New Post of Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator



Expanded Role Includes Leadership of Collections, Exhibitions, and Curatorial Programs at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City and All Guggenheim Museums Internationally

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NEW YORK, NY—(February 15, 2017) — Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced that Nancy Spector has been appointed to serve as the institution’s first Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, providing conceptual and strategic leadership of collections, exhibitions, and curatorial programs at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Fifth Avenue in New York and at all Guggenheim museums internationally. Through the new position of Artistic Director and Chief Curator, the Guggenheim will unify and strengthen artistic activities throughout its international constellation of museums and initiatives, both existing and in development, while accommodating the particular collections, initiatives, and audiences of each.
Nancy Spector previously served at the Guggenheim for more than 29 years, most recently in the role of Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator. She joined the Brooklyn Museum in April 2016 as Deputy Director and Chief Curator. As Artistic Director and Chief Curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, she will report directly to Richard Armstrong.
Richard Armstrong said, “Over the past year, we have given fresh thought to the way the Guggenheim creates and manages its artistic program in New York and abroad. This exploration has identified the need for an individual who provides leadership and strategic vision for collections, exhibitions and programs across all aspects of the Foundation and all the museums in our international constellation. During her many years at the Guggenheim, Nancy Spector shaped our institution in singular and significant ways. She is the ideal person to take on this new role working with the Guggenheim to realize and reimagine the radical purpose its founders gave it 80 years ago. We are pleased to welcome her into her new role.”
Nancy Spector said, “I’m grateful to Anne Pasternak, the Trustees and the wonderful staff of the Brooklyn Museum for giving me the opportunity to work with them and learn from them in their great institution. It has been a privilege to participate in the museum’s vital engagement with its community and to address the possibilities of its encyclopedic collection. But when Richard Armstrong approached me with the new position of Artistic Director at the Guggenheim, I simply could not let this extraordinary opportunity—which is truly unique to the Guggenheim—pass me by. I look forward to working with my Guggenheim colleagues in New York and around the world in envisioning the many innovative programs and initiatives we will create together in the coming years.”
Anne Pasternak, the Shelby White and Leon Levy Director of the Brooklyn Museum, added, “We are truly grateful to Nancy for the wisdom and leadership she contributed during her tenure here at the Brooklyn Museum. From her thoughtful strategic planning contributions to reenergizing our curatorial department, exhibiting more of our historic collections, working on curatorial collaborations and prestigious partnerships, and boosting our public programs. Her time here has been a time of real action. We will build on these foundations and look forward to collaborating with Nancy in the future. We wish her all the best in this great new international adventure.”

About Nancy Spector

Nancy Spector received her Masters Degree in Art History from the Clark Art Institute at Williams College and her MPhil from City University Graduate Center in New York after graduating from Sarah Lawrence College. During more than 29 years at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, including 10 years as Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, she organized exhibitions on conceptual photography, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Matthew Barney’s Cremaster cycle, Richard Prince, Louise Bourgeois (with Tate Modern), Marina Abramovic, Tino Sehgal, Maurizio Cattelan and Peter Fischli/David Weiss. She also organized the group exhibitions Moving PicturesSingular Forms (Sometimes Repeated); and theanyspacewhatever. She was Adjunct Curator of the 1997 Venice Biennale and co-organizer of the first Berlin Biennial in 1998. Under the auspices of the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin, she initiated special commissions by Andreas Slominski, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Lawrence Weiner, and Gabriel Orozco, as well as a special exhibition on the work of Joseph Beuys and Matthew Barney.
She has contributed to numerous books on contemporary visual culture with essays on artists such as Maurizio Cattelan, Luc Tuymans, Roni Horn, Janine Antoni, Douglas Gordon, Tino Seghal, and Mona Hatoum. In 2007 she was the U.S. Commissioner for the Venice Biennale, where she presented an exhibition of work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Spector is a recipient of the Peter Norton Family Foundation Curators Award, five International Art Critics Association Awards, and a Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award for her work on Youtube Play, a Biennial of Creative Video. In 2014, she was included in the 40 Women Over 40 to Watch list. At the Brooklyn Museum, where she worked for as Deputy Director and Curator from 2016-17, she reorganized the curatorial staff structure, launched the 10-exhibition program Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism, and spearheaded the cross-collection, long-term exhibition Infinite Blue

About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum & Foundation

Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
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ZhouTao_InstallationViewTalesOfOurTime
SPRING 2017 PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
The Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and film series in conjunction with the exhibitions Tales of Our Time and Visionaries: Creating a Modern GuggenheimMORE >
Tales of Our Time Programs
Gallery Reading: Ken Liu
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 12 PM 
Author Ken Liu (The Grace of Kings and The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories) reads from his commissioned short story in the Tales of Our Time exhibition catalogue and other texts inspired by works on view.

Free with museum admission. Limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Film Premiere and Director Q&A: The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
The Guggenheim hosts the U.S. premiere of The Swim, an art film with documentary characteristics. To create the film, artist He Xiangyu returned three times to his hometown in Kuandian—a poor county located by the Yalu River on the China–North Korea border. Through interviews with Korean War veterans, defectors from North Korea, and their families, The Swim unveils the cruel reality hidden behind the beautiful scenery of Kuandian and presents the utopian fantasy projected on individuals. The event concludes with a Q&A with He Xiangyu and Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Hypnotic Show
TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 7 AND 9:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 7 AND 9:30 PM
An exhibition that takes place in the mind—individual and collective—this intimate experiment in cognitive exhibition making through art and hypnosis was conceived by Raimundas Malašauskas and Marcos Lutyens. It explores how the image and concept of place can be depicted through alternative modes of narrative and serves as an imaginary ending to the exhibition.

$18, $15 members, $10 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken: Tea Gatherings
WEDNESDAYS, THROUGH MARCH 8, 1:30–5:45 PM
Since 2002 Yangjiang Group has been inviting neighbors in Yangjiang, its small hometown on the southern coast of China, to drink tea, play soccer, practice calligraphy, and enjoy communal dinners. As part of Unwritten Rules Cannot Be Broken, their newly commissioned work for Tales of Our Time, visitors are invited to converse and contemplate calligraphy over a cup of tea prepared and served by local tea brewers. Visitors are also encouraged to measure their blood pressure and heart rate before and after experiencing this installation—a humorous ploy designed to calculate the purported relaxing effects of a tea gathering.

Free with museum admission. No RSVP is required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Tours in Mandarin
SATURDAYS, 12–1 PM
Join a conversational tour of Tales of Our Time in Mandarin facilitated by an educator trained in art history and gallery teaching.

Free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.
Tales of Our Time Film Program
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, THROUGH FEBRUARY 25, 1 PM
These documentary and narrative films explore topics shared with the exhibition, investigating concepts such as boundaries, territory, migration, and place. Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with museum admission. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings

February 3–4Traces of an Invisible City, directed by Bo Wang and Pan Lu; The Wangs, directed by Bo Wang (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 10–11Life after Life, directed by Zhang Hanyi
February 17–18Terra Nullius or: How to Be a Nationalist, directed by James T. Hong (Both screenings include a Q&A session with the director.)
February 24–25The Swim, directed by He Xiangyu (February 25 screening includes a Q&A session with the director.)
Visionaries Programs
Long-Look Wednesdays
WEDNESDAYS, FEBRUARY–AUGUST 
Each Wednesday during the run of Visionaries, museum visitors have the opportunity to explore the Guggenheim collection, including one-hour focused experiences with a single work, in specialist-led learning experiences.

One Hour, One Object Tours
WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM Join a museum educator trained in art, art history, and gallery teaching to spend an hour focusing in detail on one work of art through conversation and close looking.

Collection in Focus
SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 12 PM Join a curator and conservator in the galleries for an in-depth discussion of topics including new historical research and scientific conservation studies/analyses. Limited capacity.

Curator’s Eye Tour of Visionaries
APRIL 12, 12 PM Megan Fontanella, Curator, Collections and Provenance, and curator of Visionaries, leads a tour of the exhibition.
Free with museum admission. Some events have limited capacity. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar. 
Eye to Eye: Artist-Led Tours
TUESDAYS, APRIL 11 AND MAY 23, 6:30 PM
Guggenheim collection artists lead intimate after-hours tours through Visionaries, offering their unique perspectives on the works and  reflections on such topics as abstraction, mediums, and materials. Each program includes a reception in the Guggenheim rotunda.

April 11: Lucy Dodd
May 23: Julia Dault

$25, $20 members, $12 students. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar
Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict
FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS, MARCH 3–25, 1 PM
On the occasion of Women’s History Month, the Guggenheim hosts weekly screenings of Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland. The film focuses on a key figure in the Guggenheim’s institutional history as she moved through the cultural upheaval of the 20th century to build one of the most important collections of modern art today.

Screenings take place in the New Media Theater, Lower Level, and are free with admission. For the full schedule, visit guggenheim.org/filmscreenings.
Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture
John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone
APRIL 25, 6:30 PM 
Poet John Giorno and artist Ugo Rondinone met at a reading in 1997 and have since become life partners and each other’s muses. For the Seventh Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture, Giorno and Rondinone discuss and reflect on their respective creative practices  in a conversation moderated by Laura Hoptman, Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, Museum of Modern Art. The program concludes with a reception in the Guggenheim’s iconic rotunda.
Free with RSVP. To RSVP or for more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

This series is facilitated by the donors to the Robert Rosenblum Fund who are greatly acknowledged for their generosity.
Mind’s Eye Tours
SELECT MONDAYS, 6:30 PM, AND SELECT WEDNESDAYS, 2 PM 
For visitors who are blind or have low vision, these tours and workshops are presented through verbal description, conversation, sensory experiences, and creative practice. Free, RSVP required. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/mindseye.

Monday, February 13: Love and Art
Wednesday, March 8: Visionaries
Monday, April 3: Guggenheim Collection: Focus on Brancusi
Art After Dark
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 9 PM–MIDNIGHT; EXCLUSIVE MEMBERS' HOUR: 8–9 PM 
An after-hours private viewing of current exhibitions, including Visionaries: Creating a Modern Guggenheim and Tales of Our Time, featuring a cash bar and live musical entertainment.

Free for members, $25 general admission. Purchase tickets online in advance or become a member. Cash bar serves wine and beer. Guests will be asked for a photo ID. Limited general admission tickets will go on sale closer to the event date. No tickets are sold at the door.


 China Institute
  Renwen Society

Symposium on Liu Haisu,    

Pioneer of Modern Chinese Art

Sunday, December 42:00-4:00pm

Speakers: Ms. Liu Chan, Mr. Chen Lusheng, Ms. Zhang Anna
Event fee: FREE
40 Rector Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006




Liu Haisu was a prominent twentieth-century Chinese painter and a noted art educator. He excelled at combining traditional Chinese painting methods with European techniques, especially those of van Gogh and Cézanne, and promoted this style as a model for revolutionizing art education in China. As the leader of art schools in Shanghai and Nanjing, Liu exerted extraordinary influence. The scion of a distinguished literary family, Liu studied calligraphy under Kang Youwei and traditional landscape and flower painting under Wu Changshi and Chen Hengke. He became one of the founders of the Shanghai Academy, the first art college in modern China. During the 1920s and '30s he organized several important national and international exhibitions and toured Japan and Europe, where he studied Western techniques and exhibited his own works. As a teacher, Liu maintained that painters should combine a knowledge of formal art theory with their natural talent and personal judgment, a departure from the Chinese tradition of copying the compositions and techniques of old masters. His works in traditional Chinese style were free-flowing and brilliant in color.  

To commemorate the 120th anniversary of his birth, The Renwen Society presents a special symposium on the art legend on Sunday, December 42-4 pmSpeakers include: 
Ms. Liu Chan, daughter of Liu Haisu, Guest Professor at Nanjing University of the Arts, Honorary President of the Liu Haisu Gallery in Changzhou 
Mr. Chen Lusheng, Former Vice President of the National Museum of China 
Ms. Zhang Anna, President of Changzhou Liu Haisu-Xiayiqiao Art Museum

Follow Renwen's WeChat: chineselectures  


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Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Announces Second Exhibition of Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection: The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence

Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority Announces Second Exhibition of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection, Opening March 8












The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence will offer a transcultural perspective on art since the 1960s
Niki de Saint Phalle
Pirodactyl over New York, 1962
Paint, plaster, and various objects on two wood panels, 249.9 x 309.9 x 29.8 cm
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
© Niki Charitable Art Foundation; Courtesy Galerie Georges – Philippe & Nathalie Vallois
Photo: © André Morain, Courtesy Niki Charitable Art Foundation and Galerie GP & N Vallois, Paris

Exhibition: The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence
Venue: Manarat Al Saadiyat, Cultural District, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
On View: March 8, 2017
(ABU DHABI, November 7, 2016)Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) announced today the second exhibition of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection, The Creative Act: Performance• Process • Presence, at Manarat Al Saadiyat on Saadiyat Island. The exhibition, which will run from March 8, 2017, will bring together artists of different nationalities and generations who have emphasised performance, process, and human presence in their practice, offering a transcultural perspective on these defining aspects of contemporary art. The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence follows the 2014 exhibition Seeing Through Light: Selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection, which welcomed more than 90,000 visitors and presented artworks from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection for the first time.
HE Saif Saeed Ghobash, Director General of TCA Abu Dhabi, said: “Abu Dhabi has become a vibrant cultural destination through unique public engagement programmes establishing an interactive dialogue between Abu Dhabi and the world, and creating its own cultural characteristic around its urban and contemporary landscapes. The Creative Act exhibition will emphasise intertwined histories among countries, within regions, and across continents, consistent with the curatorial vision of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, and echoing TCA Abu Dhabi’s strategic endeavours to transform Abu Dhabi to a hub for world cultures. This exhibition will highlight connections between contemporary artists revealing common sources of inspiration, lines of influence, and distinctive contributions.”
Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation said:  “As with Seeing Through LightThe Creative Act presents some of the dynamic, original curatorial research underway for the future Guggenheim Abu Dhabi and draws back the curtain on the creative process through the work of a diverse group of artists featured in the growing collection. Many works in the exhibition focus on particular locales, among them Abu Dhabi, London, New York, Paris, and Tokyo. Both individually and collectively, they reveal a sense of wonder and magic that can be found in the everyday.”
The Creative Act exhibition will feature more than 25 works in a variety of media—installation, painting, photography, sculpture, video, and works on paper, representing more than 18 artists. The exhibition will focus on the related themes of performance, process, and presence, which frame the exhibition’s curatorial narrative:
PerformancePerformances can unfold in a given time and place, remaining afterward as recordings and documentations, and they can serve primarily as the means for creating discrete objects. Since the 1960s, many artists have adopted performative practices, sometimes serving as the central protagonist and undertaking carefully choreographed or spontaneous actions, and other times functioning as directors by providing instructions to participants. These aspects will be explored in The Creative Act, through works by artists such as Rasheed Araeen and Mohammed Kazem.
ProcessThe exhibition will bring together artworks that emphasise the act of creation and will feature photographs, films, videos, and archival documentation that will animate the methodology, inspiration, and innovation of the included artists. Many of the artists stress the importance of process, producing works that reveal how they were made, that forefront materiality, and that allow for transformation over time or in response to viewer interaction. Their art and related archival materials will bring to life the dynamic working methods of artists such as Shiraga Kazuo and Tanaka Atsuko, who were associated with the Gutai Art Association (Japan, 1954–1972). The Creative Act also will feature another group of 1960s pioneers, among them Niki de Saint Phalle and Günther Uecker, who are known for their development of experimental approaches that involve the use of ostensibly destructive techniques and everyday materials to comment on contemporary society. The section will also feature an artwork by Anish Kapoor who is known for his large-scale geometric and biomorphic sculptures reminiscent of nature and living organisms.
Presence
The Creative Act also will delve into the theme of human presence, manifested by the appearance of the artist or others in the artworks as well as visible traces of the physical acts undertaken to realise them. Three immersive installations particularly exemplify this aspect. Works on paper and a video installation by Susan Hefuna examine similarities between the choreography of dance and people’s everyday movements as they traverse city streets.
The Creative Act: Performance • Process • Presence is curated by Valerie Hillings, Ph.D., Curator and Manager, Curatorial Affairs, Abu Dhabi Project; Sasha Kalter-Wasserman, Assistant Curator, Abu Dhabi Project; with Sarah Dwider, Curatorial Assistant, Abu Dhabi Project, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; and Maisa Al Qassimi, Head of Programmes – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, with Muneera Al Sayegh, Programmes Officer – Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority.
About Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi)
Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority conserves and promotes the heritage and culture of Abu Dhabi emirate and leverages them in the development of a world-class, sustainable destination of distinction, which enriches the lives of visitors and residents alike. The authority manages the emirate’s tourism sector and markets the destination internationally through a wide range of activities aimed at attracting visitors and investment. Its policies, plans and programmes relate to the preservation of heritage and culture, including protecting archaeological and historical sites and to developing museums, including the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. TCA Abu Dhabi supports intellectual and artistic activities and cultural events to nurture a rich cultural environment and honour the emirate’s heritage. A key authority role is to create synergy in the destination’s development through close co-ordination with its wide-ranging stakeholder base. http://tcaabudhabi.ae/en
About Guggenheim Abu Dhabi
The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi museum will promote the understanding and appreciation of contemporary art, architecture, and other manifestations of modern and contemporary visual culture from an international perspective. A curatorial programme with a transcultural perspective on art and visual culture from the 1960s to the present will have a strong focus on art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia, exploring the specific identity derived from the cultural traditions of Abu Dhabi and the United Arab Emirates. The future museum, and its growing collection, is owned by the Government of Abu Dhabi. Surrounded almost entirely by water, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will have spectacular views of the Saadiyat Cultural District and the Arabian Gulf. Galleries, many unprecedented in scale, are distributed around the central atrium on four levels connected by glass bridges above. Open to the elements, the museum cones housing contemporary art commissions, recall the region’s ancient wind-towers, which both ventilate and shade the exterior courtyards in a fitting blend of Arabian tradition and modern design. The museum will also feature a 350-seat theatre, education workshops and classrooms, an onsite conservation lab, as well as a retail store, cafes, and a restaurant.
The museum will be a catalyst for scholarship in a variety of fields, chief among them the history of art from West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia in the 20th and 21st centuries. A dynamic programme of changing exhibitions will explore common themes and affinities among the work of artists across time and geography. An ambitious programme of commissions created for the collection and exceptional spaces of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi will reinforce the museum’s commitment to working with artists and the art of our time.
Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is being developed in collaboration with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim FoundationFounded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.



 China Institute
 Public Program

New York Asian Film Festival Screening & Reception: What's in the Darkness

Schedule:
Monday, June 27 
6:15 pm - 7:50 pm: Film Screening 
7:55 pm - 8:25 pm: Q&A with Director Wang Yichun 
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm: Reception featuring a talk with Subway Cinema, Freida & Roy Furman Gallery 

Location:
Walter Reade Theater, Lincoln Center, 165 West 65th Street, New York, 10023

Event fee:
Reception is Free 
Screening: $14 general, $11 students & senior, $9 FSLC member

The 2015 Village Voice Best Film Festival award winner is back! China Institute is thrilled to be a part of this year's New York Asian Film Festival, co-hosting the North American Premiere ofWhat's in the Darkness. A coming-of-age fable mapped onto an unsolved crime story, at once dream-hazed and sharp-edged with suspense, Variety called writer/director Wang Yichun's outstanding debut "the most acute and uncompromisingly grim murder mystery to come out of China in years." Following the screening there will be a Q&A with director Wang Yichun and a free reception hosted by China Institute and sponsored by Tsingtao Beer.

What's In The Darkness
Wang Yichun, China, 2015, DCP, 98m
Mandarin with English subtitles
Starring: Su Xiaotong, Guo Xiao, Lu Qiwei, Deng Gang

A coming-of-age fable mapped onto an unsolved crime story, at once dream-hazed and sharp-edged with suspense, Variety called writer/director Wang Yichun's outstanding debut "the most acute and uncompromisingly grim murder mystery to come out of China in years," but the film owes as much to The Diary of a Teenage Girl as it does to Diary of a Serial KillerWhat's in the Darkness brilliantly evokes the perils of repressed desire, while equating China's transition to capitalism with the prurient confusion of puberty. In a semi-rural village of Hebei Province in the early 1990s, someone is raping and killing young women, and carving a cross into their flesh. Following the case with perverse fascination, Jing (Su Xiaotong) struggles to harness her emerging sexuality while her father (Guo Xiao), a low-level cop, futilely tries to convince his incompetent colleagues of the merits of forensic investigation. Presented with the support of China Institute. Learn More Forward to a Friend! Events Calendar  Join Our Mailing List


For questions or to register by phone, please contact Michael Buening at 212-744-8181 ext. 149 or by email at mbuening@chinainstitute.org

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GUGGENHEIM
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise
BUT A STORM IS BLOWING FROM PARADISE: PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM
In conjunction with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa, the museum presents the following programs.
VIEW CALENDAR
Hello Guggenheim: Film and Video Curated by Bidoun Projects
FRIDAYS–MONDAYS IN MAY, 1 PM 
Hello Guggenheim is a diverse four-week program of films and videos that are united in their mistrust of inherited narratives about history and documentation, testimony and voice. By turns fantastical and irreverent, adversarial and contrived, the works in Hello Guggenheim provide an unusual and uniquely compelling vantage onto the politics of truth of the moving image. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. Screenings take place in the New Media Theater and last between 60 and 90 minutes. MORE >
Curator’s Eye Tours
Join Guggenheim curators on a focused tour of But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. Curator’s Eye tours meet at the Information Desk. MORE >
Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa
FRIDAY, MAY 13, 12 PM
This tour will be ASL interpreted.
Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 12 PM
Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa
FRIDAY, SEPT 23, 12 PM
Conversations at the Crossroads
This series pairs scholars and educators to explore the exhibitions ideas and meanings. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. MORE >
Joseph Massad, Professor of Modern Arab Politics and Intellectual History, Columbia University
SUNDAY, MAY 22, 3 PM
Tim Cresswell, Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs; Professor of History and International Affairs; Associate Director for Public Humanities, Humanities Center, Northeastern University
SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 3 PM
Talinn Grigor, Professor of Art History and Graduate Adviser, University of California, Davis
SUNDAY, JULY 17, 3 PM
Exhibition Tours in Arabic بالعربية
JUNE 18, 12 PM
JULY 23, 12 PM
AUG 20, 12 PM
SEPT 17, 12 PM
Join a conversational tour conducted in Arabic led by a specialist in art history and education. This tour will focus on the themes and artworks in the exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. This tour meets on the rotunda floor. MORE >
Exhibition Tours en français
JUNE 25, 12 PM
JULY 30, 12 PM
AUG 27, 12 PM
SEPT 24, 12 PM
Join a conversational tour conducted in French led by a specialist in art history and education. This tour will focus on the themes and artworks in the exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Free with museum admission. No RSVP required. This tour meets on the rotunda floor. MORE >
Lectures & Symposia
An Evening with Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira
TUESDAY, JULY 12, 6:30 PM
In this program, artists Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira provide short talks about their works on view in But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise. Following, they join Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, for a group discussion about themes in the exhibition. Registration details will soon be available. MORE >
(De)Coupling as Discourse or The Rise of the Global South
SEPTEMBER 2016
Organized by Sara Raza, this symposium unites elements from the three phases of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative to explore the rise of contemporary art activity in the Global South. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.
Summer Drawing Series
JULY 17, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
JULY 24, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
JULY 31, 10:30 AM–12:30 PM
Families participate in an interactive gallery tour of But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise and respond to it using various approaches to drawing that encourage a new experience of the works on view. Free with advanced registration. Families with children ages 7 and up. MORE >
Mind’s Eye with Susan Hefuna
MONDAY, AUGUST 1, 2 PM
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2 PM
Led by exhibition artist Susan Hefuna, this two-part workshop welcomes visitors who are blind or have low vision to explore walking and alternative sensory experience as part of the creative process. Free with RSVP. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.
Looking Ahead
Public Movement: Debriefing Session II
SUMMER/FALL 2016
The research group Public Movement invites museum visitors to attend a one-on-one debriefing on modern art made in Palestine before 1948. The private session draws out the performative relationship between nation-states and their cultural institutions. Free with museum admission. RSVP required. More details will soon be available on guggenheim.org/calendar.

Guggenheim Presents Recent Art from the Middle East and North Africa in the Third Exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative

But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise Opens April 29 at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and Travels to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017


Exhibition: But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North AfricaVenue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location: Tower 4 and Tower 5 Galleries
Dates: April 29–October 5, 2016
Media Preview: Thursday, April 28, 2016, 10 am–12 pm
(NEW YORK, NY—April 28, 2016)—From April 29 to October 5, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York presents But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa, the third exhibition of theGuggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. Organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, the exhibition features a wide range of artistic voices and critical concerns from a rapidly evolving region through installation, photography, sculpture, video, and work on paper. Interwoven with questions and ideas about the region’s colonial histories, the exhibition investigates such themes as architecture and geometry, modernism and migration, and the process of unearthing hidden ideas.
As with the two previous exhibitions in the MAP initiative, which focused on contemporary art practice from South and Southeast Asia and Latin America, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise features artworks that have been recently acquired for the Guggenheim’s collection. Under the auspices of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund, the collection has now grown by over 125 works from more than 85 artists and collectives. Curatorial research for the exhibition was developed with an eye toward building on the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism, as well as fostering new scholarship and conceiving a range of educational initiatives and public programs within the museum and online. On-site and digital programs have served more than 14,000 adults, families, educators, and students worldwide. Following its presentation at the Guggenheim, the exhibition will travel to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017.
Sara Raza said, “The exhibition enables viewers to experience a range of concerns among artists from a variety of access points to showcase the cross-circulation of knowledge. One of them is the migration of ideas and peoples in an age of anxiety, when civil liberties and freedom of movement have come under repeated attack. Another is architecture seen as an ideological tool and in reference to the former colonial powers that shaped the region. The exhibition’s artworks also embed numerous proposals—we might think of them as ‘conceptual contraband’—that contradict the mass media’s highly politicized representation of the Middle East and North Africa. As such, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradisehighlights the formation of the present while acknowledging the continued influence of the past.”
“This exhibition bristles with challenging ideas and uncompromising artistic strategies, all of which help us to reflect upon a crucial region of today’s world,” said Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation. “It is a superb realization of the ambitions of the MAP initiative in particular and the Guggenheim’s global program in general. We are grateful to our long-term collaborator and supporter UBS, to Sara Raza and our curatorial and education team, and to the artists in this exhibition for helping us rethink and expand the traditional purview of European and North American art museums. By working on the ground in different regions of the world with artists, arts professionals, and audiences, we can open the discussion to multiple histories of art and create a museum that more faithfully represents the world in which we live.”
“Artists rooted in the vibrant cultures of the Middle East and North Africa are currently addressing some of today’s most critical issues, and doing so from within a region at the center of sweeping global change,” said Jürg Zeltner, CEO, UBS Wealth Management. “The Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative provides an exceptional opportunity to encounter the crucial ideas and insights of some of the best of these artists, and to engage in the kind of international dialogue that contributes to positive change. At UBS, our support for this exhibition, and for the MAP initiative as a whole, parallels our holistic approach to business relationships. We take pride in enabling our clients, employees, and the public to participate in the provocative and exciting creative community of the arts, much as we facilitate our clients’ informed involvement in the complex global economy.”
Exhibition Overview
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise features 18 works—many of them large-scale, mixed media installations—by 17 artists. The exhibition, installed on two levels of the museum’s Tower Galleries, draws its title from an artwork by Rokni Haerizadeh, which in turn is quoted from German philosopher Walter Benjamin in a noted essay from 1940. Haerizadeh’s But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise (2010) is a suite of works on paper based on images appropriated from mainstream news sources. By overlaying these photographs of collective gatherings with gesso, ink, and watercolor, the artist employs fable to transform human protagonists into part-animal hybrids while rendering a grotesque view of downward descending contemporary events promulgated by the mass media.
Other works that implicitly challenge existing representations of the Middle East and North Africa include Latent Images, Diary of a Photographer, 177 Days of Performances (2015) by Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, an installation of 354 books, displayed on 177 metal shelves, that purport to contain written descriptions of pictures taken by a fictional photographer, Abdallah Farah, during the Lebanese Civil War to illustrate the fine line between the process of mythmaking and the “real.”
Among the works that touch on the urgent subject of the migration of people and ideas isFlying Carpets (2011) by Nadia Kaabi-Linke, a stainless steel structure installed overhead that casts shadows in the gallery that evoke the outlines of the carpets on which undocumented migrants from North Africa and Asia display the goods they sell to tourists in Venice.
Architecture figures as a key element in the formation of modernism in the region and is prevalent in several works including Untitled (Ghardaïa) (2009) by Kader Attia, a scale model in couscous of the Algerian World Heritage Site of Ghardaïa, the traditional buildings of which influenced the modernism of Le Corbusier; Building (2009) by Susan Hefuna, a suite of nine drawings that suggest both cartographic diagrams and sketches of architectural elements such as the mashrabiya or traditional latticed window; Plan for Greater Baghdad(2015) by Ala Younis, a large installation of archival materials and architectural models of the gymnasium designed for Baghdad in 1957 by Le Corbusier and inaugurated in 1980 as the Saddam Hussein Gymnasium. By contrast, Abbas Akhavan’s Study for a Monument(2013–16), a series of bronze casts of plants native to the Tigris-Euphrates river system that are placed on the floor atop white sheets, suggests a range of alternative ideas around the culture and dissemination of public monuments.
A hybridized view of past and present is presented by Ergin Çavuşoğlu’s work Crystal & Flame (2010), which draws on literary texts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to meditate on social norms and moral codes through the depiction of three outwardly disparate but ultimately complimentary narratives that probe systems of value and polarity in contemporary society. Similarly, Ahmed Mater’s Disarm (2013) and Disarm 1–10 (2013), present video and photographs taken by the artist from the cockpit of a Saudi military helicopter scouting for unauthorized pilgrims approaching Meccathereby highlighting an urban landscape undergoing rapid structural and social change.
To showcase the breadth of videos acquired, two will be rotated halfway through the installation: A Brief History of Collapses (2012) by Mariam Ghani, a two-channel video installation that contrasts the eighteenth-century Fridericianum in Kassel, Germany (now restored from the damage it suffered in World War II) with the Dar ul-Aman Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan (built in 1929 and now a ruin), will be on view through July 6, along with Çavuşoğlu’s Crystal & Flame. Zineb Sedira’s Gardiennes d’images (2010), a multichannel video that explores the archive of Algerian-French photographer Mohammed Kouaci (1922–1996), who was active during the Algerian war of independence, and the reminiscences of his widow who is interviewed by the artist, will be on view from July 8 through the close of the exhibition. Evaders (2009), a two-channel video installation by Ori Gersht, which chronicles the 1940 flight into exile and subsequent death of Walter Benjamin, returns to the pertinent subject of migration and will also be on view beginning on July 8.
Artists represented in the exhibition are:
  • Abbas Akhavan (b. 1977, Tehran; lives and works in Toronto)
  • Kader Attia (b. 1970, Paris; lives and works in Berlin)
  • Ergin Çavuşoğlu (b. 1968, Targovishte, Bulgaria; lives and works in London)
  • Ali Cherri (b. 1976, Beirut; live and works in Beirut and Paris)
  • Ori Gersht (b. 1967, Tel Aviv; lives and works in London
  • Mariam Ghani (b. 1978, New York; lives and works in New York)
  • Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige (b. 1969, Beirut, Lebanon; live and work in Beirut and Paris)
  • Rokni Haerizadeh (b. 1978, Tehran; lives and works in Dubai)
  • Susan Hefuna (b. 1962, Berlin; lives and works in Düsseldorf)
  • Iman Issa (b. 1979, Cairo; lives and works in New York)
  • Nadia Kaabi-Linke (b. 1978, Tunis; lives and works in Berlin)
  • Mohammed Kazem (b. 1969, Dubai; lives and works in Dubai)
  • Hassan Khan (b. 1975, London; lives and works in Cairo)
  • Ahmed Mater (b. 1979, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia; lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)
  • Zineb Sedira (b. 1963, Paris; lives and works in London)
  • Ala Younis (b. 1974, Kuwait; lives and works in Amman, Jordan, and London)
Additional acquisitions for the Guggenheim UBS MAP collection include work by artists Lida Abdul (b. 1973, Kabul; lives and works in Los Angeles and Kabul), Emily Jacir (b. 1972, Bethlehem, lives and works in Rome, Italy and Ramallah, Palestine) and Gülsün Karamustafa (b. 1946, Ankara, Turkey; lives and works in Istanbul.)
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa is organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa. Joan Young, Director of Curatorial Affairs, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, provides curatorial oversight for the MAP initiative with Amara Antilla, Assistant Curator.
Public and Education Programs
But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise is accompanied by a range of public, educational, and online programs. Highlights include a summer launch of performative debriefings by research group Public Movement that reexamine art histories throughout the exhibition, as well as a residency with Beirut-based artist and musician Raed Yassin, who will create a soundtrack inspired by the exhibition’s themes to be released in late July; a four-week film series, Hello Guggenheim, co-presented with Bidoun Projects from May 6 to 30; an Open House for Educators on May 16; artist talks featuring Ahmed Mater and Ala Younis on April 30 and Ori Gersht and Zineb Sedira on July 12; Sunday gallery conversations with multidisciplinary educators and scholars; gallery tours in Arabic and French on select Saturdays; a special two-part Mind’s Eye workshop for people who are blind or have low vision led by artist Susan Hefuna on August 1 and 10; an academic symposium in September; a technology and new media arts-based summer camp for 8- to 11-year olds from June 13 to 17, and a summer drawing series for families on July 17, 24, and 31, and drop-in family and school programs throughout the run of the exhibition. Education resources include a Family Activity Guide and Teacher’s Resource Guide, and a multimedia app featuring both commentary by the curator and exhibition artists, and verbal descriptions authored by Guggenheim educators. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
GUGGENHEIM
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Guggenheim Launches New Website Design
Enhanced Features Maximize Interaction with Art and Ideas

VIEW THE RELEASE

(NEW YORK, NY—April 21, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation launched an updated Guggenheim.org today, with a new user experience and design that places artworks at center stage, facilitates easy navigation of visitor information, and encourages engagement with the Guggenheim’s global, educational, and curatorial programs. The relaunch maximizes users’ interaction with art and ideas while preserving the institution’s visual and conceptual heritage.

It Takes Two at the Guggenheim Museum on April 23

Noted Speakers and Performers Address Creativity in Pairs Across Art, Architecture, Dance, Film, and Music for the Final Week of Peter Fischli and David Weiss Retrospective
Participants to Include Artist Matthew Barney and Composer Jonathan Bepler, Experimental Electronic Band Matmos, Architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Filmmakers and Producers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi, and Philosopher Simon Critchley
(NEW YORK, NY—March 30, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents It Takes Two on Saturday, April 23 from 9 pm to 4 am. This durational, multidisciplinary program is presented on the occasion of the retrospective Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, on view through April 27. For the program, exhibition curators Nancy Spector and Nat Trotman, with Ben Vershbow, Director, New York Public Library Labs, invited a wide range of speakers and performers to address questions posed by Fischli and Weiss’s lifelong collaboration, including: Why do creative minds gravitate toward one another? What is the unique result of creating in pairs? Why is the trope of the comic/tragic duo so prevalent in film and literature?
Tickets are $30, $20 members, $15 students, and include overnight access to the Fischli Weiss exhibition. A cash bar will be available. Further details, an event schedule, and ticketing information will be posted atwww.guggenheim.org/ittakestwo
The list of participants is as follows, and is subject to change:
Artist Matthew Barney and composer Jonathan Bepler
Professor Beatriz Colomina, Princeton University
Lise Anne Couture and Hani Rashid, Asymptote Architecture
Professor and philosopher Simon Critchley, The New School
Performance duo Dancenoise
Filmmakers and producers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi, of the series “Making a Murderer”
Architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio
Artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset
Art and performance duo Fischerspooner
Artist duo Gerard & Kelly
Renate Goldmann, Director of the Leopold-Hoesch-Museum and Papiermuseum Düren, Germany
Choreographer David Gordon and dancer Valda Setterfield
Artists and fashion photographers Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin
Academy Award-winning songwriters Kristen and Bobby Lopez, of Disney’s film Frozen
Artist Nate Lowman
Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec, creators of the Dear Data project
Experimental electronic band Matmos
Curator Linda Murray, New York Public Library
Associate Professor Bibiana Obler, George Washington University
Curator Christopher Phillips, International Center of Photography
Curator Doug Reside, New York Public Library
Multimedia performance and music duo Royal Osiris Karaoke Ensemble
Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of Powers of Two
Artist duo Doug and Mike Starn
Architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien
For general information, call 212 423 3500 or visit the museum online atguggenheim.org and guggenheim.org/connect.
Exhibition Funders
Major support for the exhibition has been provided by Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel.

The Leadership Committee for Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Chairs Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann. Additional support is provided by Matthew Marks; Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers; Galerie Eva Presenhuber; Glenstone; Collection Ringier; Alfred Richterich; Per Skarstedt; Walter A. Bechtler Foundation, Switzerland; Thomas Ammann Fine Art AG, Zürich; Ulla Dreyfus-Best; Hauser & Wirth; Gigi and Andrea Kracht; Arend and Brigitte Oetker; and Sylvie Winckler.

Funding is also generously provided by ART MENTOR FOUNDATION LUCERNE, National Endowment for the Arts, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, and New York State Council on the Arts.



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Artists from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan Commissioned to Create New Works for Guggenheim Collection and Fall 2016 Exhibition

Five individual artists, an artists’ group, and a collaborative duo selected through The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative at the Guggenheim
Download a PDF of the release in EnglishSimplified Chinese, and Traditional Chinese.
(NEW YORK, NY—March 21, 2016)—Today, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum announced the artists who have been commissioned to create works that will enter its collection as part of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. Hailing from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, Chia-En Jao, Kan Xuan, Sun Xun, Sun Yuan & Peng Yu, Tsang Kin-Wah, Yangjiang Group, and Zhou Tao will produce works for a group exhibition opening on November 4, 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum. Working in a range of mediums, including video, sculpture, installation, mixed media on paper, and participatory intervention, these artists are unified by their distinctive and independent practices that poetically balance politics and aesthetics. Featuring the new commissioned works, the Guggenheim presentation will offer a heterogeneous view of contemporary art from China and explore tensions between individual narratives and the constructions of mainstream history. The exhibition, the second of the initiative, will be accompanied by a catalogue and a robust offering of educational programs and public events with artists.
The exhibition is organized by Hou Hanru, Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, and Xiaoyu Weng, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art. The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is part of the Guggenheim Museum’s Asian Art Initiative, directed by Dr. Alexandra Munroe, Samsung Senior Curator, Asian Art and Senior Advisor, Global Arts.
Launched in 2013, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative is the most recent of the Guggenheim’s initiatives to work with artists, scholars, and curators from around the world to bring intersecting regional and global histories of modernism and contemporary practices to the fore. Made possible by a major grant from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation, this international curatorial program focuses on commissioning major works for the Guggenheim’s collection by artists born in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, or Macao. All works created through the initiative will become part of the Guggenheim’s collection, forming The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collection. Through the selection of key artists, practices, and issues arising from across Greater China, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative seeks to strengthen the Guggenheim’s collegial network among the Chinese art community, advance the study and appreciation of post-1979 Chinese art, and expand the discourse and investigation of contemporary art today. The first of the initiative’s three exhibitions, Wang Jianwei: Time Temple, was on view at the Guggenheim from October 2014 to February 2015 and featured a sculptural installation, paintings, a film, and a performance by Wang Jianwei, one of China’s leading conceptual artists.
The second exhibition will continue the Guggenheim’s history of site-specific works developed in collaboration between artists and curators. The artists—who were selected after extensive curatorial research and studio visits—share a socially aware perspective, actively repositioning and challenging current dialogues about art from Greater China in an international context. The commissioned artists are:
Chia-En Jao (b. 1976, Taipei)
Chia-En Jao’s project-based practice stretches across different mediums, including drawing, performance, site-specific installation, and multichannel video installation. After studying, working, and exhibiting in Europe, Jao returned to Taipei where he currently lives and works. This international experience informs his perspective on the particular conditions of Taiwan’s political, economical, and social situation. His practice—deeply rooted in his local surroundings—has more recently delved into colonial histories and the cross-cultural tensions in the Asia Pacific region. His anthropological and collaborative approach has led him to work with civilian protestors, taxi drivers, and immigrant workers from Southeast Asian countries. For Jao, these personal encounters have generated intriguing and valuable interpretations of history that subtly subvert and question the established, official versions produced by the nation-state and media.
Kan Xuan (b. 1972, Xuancheng, Anhui Province)
Kan Xuan uses video as her primary medium, and also experiments with photography, installation, and performance. Kan moved to Hangzhou to study at the China Academy of Art and subsequently attended the prestigious residency program at Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. Through visual manipulations, Kan reveals the eerie details of the trivial and mundane objects, gestures, and emotions captured by her camera. Recently, Kan has explored more historical subject matters, embarking on extensive travel and research to create such video installations as Millet Mounds (2012), which surveys over one hundred extant imperial tombs across mainland China. She has participated in numerous international exhibitions—including the Guangzhou Triennial (2005 and 2012), Havana Biennial (2006), Chinese Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2007), Istanbul Biennial (2007), Moscow Biennial (2009), Gwangju Biennial (2010)—making her one of the most important global artists of her generation. Kan splits her time between Beijing and Amsterdam.
Sun Xun (b. 1980, Fuxin, Liaoning Province)
Born in an industrial mining town in northeast China, Sun Xun studied printmaking at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou. His interest in traditional modes of representation, such as ink painting and woodcut printing, is reflected in the deft craftsmanship of his animated films. Energetic and hand-drawn, his films are composed of up to five thousand single frames. Large-scale viewing environments are an integral experiential component of his work, replete with props and hand-painted walls. The artist often constructs these environments over several days. Layered with metaphors and references, Sun’s work unravels concepts such as time, history, revolution, myth, and humanity through surreal imageries and fantastical episodes. In addition to being featured in art exhibitions, his films have been screened at numerous film festivals, including the Torino Film Festival, Italy (2007), and several iterations of the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany. Sun runs Pi, an animation studio he founded in Hangzhou in 2006. He lives and works in Beijing.
Sun Yuan (b. 1972, Beijing) & Peng Yu (b. 1974, Jiamusi, Heilongjiang Province)
Sun Yuan and Peng Yu both studied oil painting at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing. They came to prominence independently in the late 1990s, partaking in landmark exhibitions of experimental art, including Post-Sense Sensibility: Alien Bodies & DelusionBeijing (1999), and Fuck Off!, Donglang Gallery, Shanghai (2000). Collaborators since 2000, the duo have incorporated unconventional and organic materials, such as live animals and human fat, into their powerful art practice that challenges the order and control imposed by political and social systems. Sun & Peng draw inspiration not only from major international social and political events, but also from local news, close friends, and neighbors. Their practice is rebellious and whimsical, addressing provocative topics with a touch of humor and a very individual brand of realism. The duo also curates occasionally; they co-organized the exhibition Unlived by What is Seen (2014–15), which spanned three venues in Beijing and focused on socially engaged art in China since 2008. In 2005, Sun & Peng were invited to be part of the inaugural exhibition in the Chinese Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. They live and work in Beijing.
Tsang Kin-Wah (b. 1976, Shantou, Guangdong Province)
Tsang Kin-Wah migrated to Hong Kong at the age of six. After completing his undergraduate degree in fine art the Chinese University of Hong Kong, he moved to London for a master’s degree in book arts at the Camberwell College of Arts, the London Institute. This sojourn in the United Kingdom and his subsequent return to Hong Kong—where Tsang has since resided—propelled him to ruminate on questions of identity and existence, especially the interplay between appearance and truth. Tsang has participated in major international group exhibitions and biennials, for which he has created installations that respond specifically to each space. Tsang’s immersive multimedia installations incorporate found footage, sound, and light to create complex, visceral interplays of text and image. As the Hong Kong representative at the Venice Biennale in 2015, he presented The Infinite Nothing, a four-part video and sound installation.
Yangjiang Group (est. 2002, Yangjiang, Guangdong Province)
Yangjiang Group was formed by Zheng Guogu (b. 1970, Yangjiang), Chen Zaiyan (b. 1971, Yangchun) and Sun Qinglin (b. 1974, Yangjiang), and takes its name from the southern coastal city where they are based. Positioning themselves away from the better-known cultural, economic, and political centers, they work in a self-designed studio building that resembles an iceberg. Such critical distance allows them to create an autonomous zone, cultivating an independent spirit and approach in pursuit of political and social freedom through art practice. Known for playfully attacking traditional Chinese calligraphy and subverting socio-cultural conventions and values, the group produces works in many mediums, such as painting, multimedia installation, performance, and social gatherings. Ordinary events and activities, such as eating, gambling, soccer playing, and tea drinking, are vital to their convivial working process and community-based exhibition experience. By framing aspects of everyday life as art, Yangjiang Group poetically and subtly resists established assumptions and hierarchies of power.
Zhou Tao (b. 1976, Changsha, Hunan Province)
Zhou Tao studied at the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts. Places and communities in massive flux provide the visual and narrative materials for his arresting video works, which are often presented in exhibitions alongside his sketches, drawings, and photographs. His practice includes transforming ordinary surroundings into theaters, where he superimposes and interchanges background and stage, viewer and actor, fact and storyline, documentation and representation. The intricate relationship of time and space unfolds organically in Zhou’s videos. His camera is not simply a recording device but an extension of his existence, through which, he has documented Guangzhou, where he lives and works, as well as New York, Paris, Bangkok, and Barcelona. Zhou’s acclaimed short film Blue and Red (2014)—which was produced by the Han Nefkens Foundation, Barcelona, and Bangkok Art and Culture Centre—premiered in 2015 at New Directors/New Films, a festival presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Blue and Red recently won the First Prize of the Jury at the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, Germany (2015).
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation
Established in Hong Kong in 2005 by Robert Hung Ngai Ho as a private philanthropic organization, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation works to foster and support Chinese arts and culture and to promote a deeper understanding of Buddhist teachings and their application in everyday life. The Foundation supports efforts that make traditional Chinese arts accessible and relevant to audiences worldwide. The Foundation also supports the creation of new works that bring innovative perspectives to the history of Chinese art, and that improve the quality and accessibility of scholarship on Chinese art. Guided by a belief that the insights of Buddhism have a vital role to play in approaching the challenges facing contemporary society, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation has committed substantial resources to expanding the understanding, interpretation, and application of Buddhist philosophy.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.

Guggenheim Receives $3 Million Challenge Grant for Art Conservation

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Guggenheim Museum Receives $3 Million Challenge Grant for Art Conservation from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Three-Year Challenge Grant to Endow Two Positions to Lead Innovative Research and Promote Public Engagement with Art
Download a PDF of this alert.
(NEW YORK, NY—March 18, 2016)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has received a $3 million endowment grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the continuing work of the museum’s Conservation Department. The grant, to be matched two-to-one, is designated specifically to endow the position of Deputy Director and Chief Conservator, held since 2007 by Carol Stringari, and a new position, Director of Engagement, Conservation and Collections. The announcement was made today by Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation.
“Carol Stringari and her conservation team are well known and highly regarded for their cutting-edge research, interdisciplinary perspective, and use of innovative techniques in advancing the field of conservation,” said Armstrong. “We commend The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its sustained commitment to the preservation of our cultural heritage, and we are grateful for its support of the Guggenheim’s work in this area. The endowment of these two positions will ensure our continued leadership in this vital area and enable the Guggenheim to create new programs to introduce its varied and fascinating conservation activities to the public.”
The Conservation Department—comprised of nine conservators who specialize in paintings, paper, time-based media, and objects of the late nineteenth century to the present—plays an integral role in the research, preservation, and presentation of the Guggenheim’s collection. The newly created position of Director of Engagement, Conservation and Collections is the first of its kind in the field. The director will further the work of the Guggenheim by supporting initiatives to make the museum’s collection and the role of art conservation more transparent and accessible to the public.
The Guggenheim conservation team works closely with colleagues at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice and at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao as well as with other arts professionals worldwide. They enable research and scholarship and train the next generation of conservators. Recent collaborations include an ongoing science program studying objects and sharing resources with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and an in-depth research project with the Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University through the NU-ACCESS program. As part of NU-ACCESS, participating institutions are conducting a thorough, collaborative study of Hungarian artist László Moholy-Nagy’s innovative materials and techniques. This research, which is generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, informed the curatorial planning of Moholy-Nagy: Future Present, on view at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, from May 27 through September 7, 2016, and will be published in exhibition’s accompanying catalogue.
A longtime pioneer in the field of contemporary art conservation, the Guggenheim established the Variable Media Initiative in 1999 to advance the preservation of media and performance-based works in its permanent collection. This initiative prompted a focus on the preservation of unconventional art forms that include conceptual, installation, performance, and time-based elements. In 2010 and 2013, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded the Panza Collection Initiative, a groundbreaking conservation and curatorial program designed to address the long-term preservation and future exhibition of the Guggenheim’s Panza Collection, which contains Minimalist, Post-Minimalist, and Conceptual artworks.
The Guggenheim’s commitment to illuminating the process of art conservation is reflected particularly in two past exhibitions organized by Carol Stringari. In 2008, the exhibition Imageless: The Scientific Study and Experimental Treatment of an Ad Reinhardt Black Painting introduced the conservator as forensic scientist, working with a group of experts to uncover the mystery hidden beneath the monochromatic painting’s surface. The 2004 exhibitionSeeing Double: Emulation in Theory and Practice displayed various strategies for preserving digital art, working closely with artists to determine parameters for change.
The recently established Conserving Computer-Based Art project, the first program focusing on this subject, aims to develop, implement, and disseminate best practices for the acquisition, preservation, maintenance, and display of computer-based art. The Guggenheim is one of the few institutions in the United States with a dedicated staff and facility for the conservation of art created through time-based media, such as video, film, slide, and audio, or computer-based technologies. The conservation team also serves to mentor and train interns and fellows and functions as a think tank and laboratory for New York University computer science students.
In an effort to stimulate and contribute to the ongoing dialogue with contemporary artists, writers, architects, curators, and scientists, the Guggenheim conservation staff continues to publish and educate, participate in and host symposia, and lecture at conferences and forums around the world.
About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies. To this end, it supports exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. The Foundation makes grants in five core program areas: Higher Education and Scholarship in the Humanities; Arts and Cultural Heritage; Diversity; Scholarly Communications; and International Higher Education and Strategic Projects.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.

YEAR OF THE MONKEY: 
News from the new China Institute



Dear Friends and Supporters of China Institute,
As we gear up to welcome the Year of the Monkey, I am pleased to share with you a brief summary of China Institute's recent activities and accomplishments.

This has been a pivotal, and in many ways, transformational year for China Institute. We moved to Lower Manhattan and are creating a brand-new flagship facility, accompanied by an expansion of programs and services designed to meet an ever growing demand of enthusiasts eager to know more about 'all things China'.

We are also approaching several significant milestones, including the 90th Anniversary of our establishment; the 50th Anniversary of the Gallery; and, the 10th year of the Confucius Institute. We will officially mark these milestones in Sept 2016 at the Grand Opening of our new facility and our inaugural Gallery Exhibition: 'Art in the time of Chaos: Masterworks from Six Dynasties China'.

The Year of the Sheep saw the CI calendar come alive, bursting with activities and programs across the three pillars for which we are known: Education, Business, Art and Culture. These programs include: language and culture classes for adults, children and educators; art exhibitions, and related public programing; business programs, including the China Impact Speaker Series; film series; author talks; culinary programs and the Gourmet Circle; family and holiday events; the Confucius Institute at CI; immersion trips to China and much more. . .

Details of our offerings can be found on our newly re-designed website: www.chinainstitute.org. Note: While China Institute has moved to the financial district, we maintain a presence on the Upper East Side with a satellite location at 151 East 65th Street, one block from our former home.

As the oldest and most prominent non-profit organization of our kind in New York, it was a special recognition and acknowledgement to be one of the key organizations to officially welcome President Xi Jinping and First Lady Peng Liyuan at a dinner in Seattle on the first stop of their State Visit to the US in Sept 2015. With the rising importance of China, and its relationship with the U.S. and the rest of the globe, our mission is more relevant and necessary, than ever before. I will continue to work to educate people in the US about China, to enhance trust through deeper cross-cultural understanding, and to make China Institute an even more dynamic 'gateway to China' for a new generation of global citizens.

Wishing you and your family Health Happiness and Prosperity for the Year of the Monkey. 

James B. Heimowitz 
President

P.S. Please check out our February eNewsletter 

100 Washington Street, New York, NY 10006
China Institute, 100 Washington Street, Entrance @ 40 Rector Street,2nd Floor, New York, NY 10006

Guggenheim Presents Contemporary Art from the Middle East and North Africa


But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise, a Presentation of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, Opens April 29 in New York and Travels to Istanbul in 2017
Exhibition:But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa
Venue:Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location:Tower 4, Thannhauser 4, Monitor 4 Galleries, and Tower 5
Dates:April 29–October 5, 2016
Download a PDF of this release. Translations in Arabic, Farsi, French, Hebrew, and Turkish are forthcoming.
(NEW YORK, NY—January 28, 2016)—From April 29 to October 5, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York will present But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise, the third exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative. Organized by Sara Raza, Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, the exhibition will feature work by a broad selection of artists that illuminates contemporary creative practice in the region and its diaspora. Following its presentation in New York, the exhibition will travel to the Pera Museum in Istanbul in 2017.
The assembled works investigate narratives of origin, ideologies of architecture, and the politics of migration throughout the Middle East and North Africa, as embodied by But a storm is blowing from paradise, a 2014 work by Rokni Haerizadeh that lends the exhibition its title. Sourced from news media, this series of works on paper examines the viral capacity of digital communications, articulated through the visual entanglement of politics and fable.
Installed on two levels of the museum, the exhibition features a selection of works, many of them installations of large or variable scale, in a range of mediums and formats including painting, photography, sculpture, video, and work on paper. Abbas Akhavan’s Study for a Monument (2013–15), which is comprised of intricate cast bronze flora specimens arranged on domestic cotton sheets and resembling a funerary display, occupies the floor by windows that overlook Central Park. Other works represent striking interventions into the museum’s galleries. These include Kader Attia’s Untitled (Ghardaïa) (2009), a reincarnation in couscous of the Algerian city from the ancient Mzab region that inspired influential French architect Le Corbusier. Nadia Kaabi-Linke’s monumental Flying Carpets (2011), a suspended stainless steel grid that casts a matrix of geometric shadows, is modeled after a central bridge in Venice where undocumented migrant street vendors of mainly African, Arab, and South Asian origin sell counterfeit goods on rugs to tourists.
According to Raza, “The exhibition forms an intricate jigsaw puzzle, representing a fragmented and shifting geographical region. With a cross-circulation of current ideas drawn from science, mathematics, and philosophy as they were developed in the area, and references to geometry as a metaphor for both physical and conceptual space, the works explore how the past informs the present. This confluence of narratives thus ‘smuggles’ certain inconvenient truths about history and memory into the realm of the exhibition, articulating the value of artistic strategies within the broader context of contemporary culture in the Middle East and North Africa.”
As with all phases of the MAP initiative, But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradisefeatures artworks that have been recently acquired for the Guggenheim’s permanent collection under the auspices of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund. Curatorial research for the exhibition was developed with an eye toward building on the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism, as well as providing new scholarship on visual culture from the Middle East and North Africa and its diaspora.
Artists represented in the exhibition include, with additional artists to be announced:
Abbas Akhavan (b. 1977, Tehran, Iran; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)
Kader Attia (b. 1970, Paris, France; lives and works in Berlin, Germany)
Ergin Çavuşoğlu (b. 1968, Targovishte, Bulgaria; lives and works in London, UK)
Mariam Ghani (b. 1978, New York, USA; lives and works in New York, USA)
Rokni Haerizadeh (b. 1978, Tehran, Iran; lives and works in Dubai, UAE)
Susan Hefuna (b. 1962, Cairo, Egypt; lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany)
Iman Issa (b. 1979, Cairo, Egypt; lives and works in New York, USA)
Nadia Kaabi-Linke (b. 1978, Tunis, Tunisia; lives and works in Berlin, Germany)
Mohammed Kazem (b. 1969, Dubai, UAE; lives and works in Dubai, UAE)
Ahmed Mater (b. 1979, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia; lives and works in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia)
Ala Younis (b. 1974, Kuwait; lives and works in Amman, Jordan)
MAP Highlights
Developed with the financial services firm UBS in 2012 to increase exposure and access to contemporary art from the culturally dynamic regions of South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa, the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative builds upon and reflects the Guggenheim’s distinguished history of internationalism and UBS’s commitment to direct engagement with contemporary art and education.
The first MAP exhibition, No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia, was organized by June Yap and presented at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center and the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore following its New York debut in 2013. The second exhibition, Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today (Bajo un mismo sol: Arte de América Latina hoy), is organized by Pablo León de la Barra and on view at Museo Jumex in Mexico City through February 7, 2016; it will be presented at the South London Gallery in June 2016.
To date, MAP’s acquisitions program has brought more than 107 works by 85 artists and collectives into the Guggenheim’s permanent collection. More than 7,000 students, teachers, families, and art enthusiasts have participated in over 80 interactive education programs, developed jointly by the Guggenheim and its institutional partners across the world specifically for local audiences. In addition, MAP’s website at guggenheim.org/MAP offers a wealth of content, including videos by artists and curators, artist profilesblog posts by international curators and critics, and interactive learning tools.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.
About Pera Museum
Pera Museum was established by Suna and Ínan Kıraç Foundation in 2005. Located in the historic Tepebaşı quarter of the city; the museum’s building, once the famous Bristol Hotel, has been transformed into an impressive new site of galleries housing both the Foundation’s permanent collection along with a program of national and international temporary exhibitions. As a modern cultural center in a vibrant part of the city, the museum also aims to provide its visitors with a broad range of cultural events that include diverse, temporary exhibitions as well as educational, film, conference and music programs.peramuseum.org
About UBS and Contemporary Art
UBS’s long and substantial record of patronage in contemporary art actively enables clients and audiences to participate in the international conversation about art and the global art market through the firm’s contemporary art platform. In addition to the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, UBS’s extensive roster of contemporary art initiatives and programs currently includes: the UBS Art Collection, one of the world’s largest and most important corporate collections of contemporary art and the firm’s long-term support for the premier international Art Basel shows in Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong, for which UBS serves as global Lead Partner. These activities are complemented by a number of regional partnerships with fine art institutions including the Fondation Beyeler in Switzerland, Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan, the Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. UBS also provides its clients with insight into the contemporary art world through the new and free iPad and iPhone app Planet Art, the UBS Art Competence Center, and the UBS Arts Forum. For more information about UBS’s commitment to contemporary art, visit ubs.com/art.

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THE GUGGENHEIM JOINS THE GOOGLE CULTURAL INSTITUTE TO EXPAND GLOBAL ACCESS TO THE MUSEUM'S LANDMARK FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT-DESIGNED ARCHITECTURE AND PERMANENT COLLECTION
(NEW YORK, NY—January 22, 2016)—Online visitors from around the world can now explore the interior of the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum through Google Street View technology. Additionally, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, in collaboration with the Google Cultural Institute, has made available over 120 artworks from its collection for online viewing. 



January 22, 2016

Photo: David Heald, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York
The Harvard Art Museums Present Everywhen: The
Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia
Tommy Watson, Wipu Rockhole, 2004. Synthetic poly- mer paint on canvas. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Purchased with funds provided by the Aborig- inal Collection Benefactors’ Group 2004, 256.2004.
© Tommy Watson. Courtesy of Yanda Aboriginal Art. November 12, 2015 (updated January 14, 2016)
The Harvard Art Museums present Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia, on display in the museums’ Special Exhibitions Gallery from February 5 through September 18, 2016.
The exhibition has been guest curated for the Harvard Art Museums by Indigenous Australian Stephen Gilchrist, of the Yamatji people of the Inggarda language group of Western Australia. Gilchrist has shaped the exhibition to ensure that it centers around the authentic perspectives and experiences of Indigenous people from Australia. The exhibition takes its title from the concept of “the Everywhen,” a term coined by Australian anthropologist William Stanner in the 1960s to describe his comprehension of Indigenous people’s understanding of time, which is conceptualized as part of a cyclical and circular
Cambridge, MA
order where past, present, and future are intertwined. As explained by Pitjantjatjara artist Tommy Watson, whose work Wipu Rockhole (2004) is included in the exhibition, “Our paintings are our memories for the future relatives.”
“The central idea of the exhibition is time,” said Gilchrist, the Australian Studies Visiting Curator at the Harvard Art Museums and associate lecturer in art history at the University of Sydney, Australia. “Everyone can relate to time; artists across the globe and across centuries have responded to the task of thinking about time and its promise, presentness, and passing. But this exhibition asks people to think about time from an Indigenous perspective, to consider how it is marked, observed, and sensed.”
While Indigenous art has at times been viewed by the international community as a relic of the past, the exhibition argues that Indigenous art and culture is equally invested in the past, present, and future. The exhibition asks visitors to consider Indigenous art as sophisticated, contemporary, and “of our time.” The exhibition also asks visitors to explore the underlying issues and experiences of the artists. While art has served as a customary medium for Indigenous people to pass on cultural practices, it has also provided a crucial public platform for Indigenous people. Through their works, Indigenous artists visualize ancient narratives, and also their experiences with colonial oppression, philosophies of ecological sustainability, interventions within museum collections, and the necessity of engaged political activism.
The exhibition features more than 70 works of varying scale and media, with the majority produced over the past 40 years. Drawn from public and private collections in Australia and the United States, many of the works have never been seen outside Australia. The exhibition is organized around four interrelated themes—Seasonality, Transformation, Performance, and Remembrance—all of which are central to Indigenous art and culture.
Works by some of the most significant contemporary Indigenous artists will be on view, including Rover Thomas (c. 1926–1998) and Emily Kam Kngwarray (c. 1910–1996), who both exhibited at the Venice Biennale; Judy Watson (b. 1959), recipient of the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award; Doreen Reid Nakamarra (c. 1955–2009), who participated in dOCUMENTA (13); Vernon Ah Kee (b. 1967), who has also exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and most recently, the Istanbul Biennial; and the visual and performance artist Christian Thompson (b. 1978), who was recently mentored by Marina Abramoviin Australia.
Page 2 of 10 November 12, 2015 (updated January 14, 2016)
Everywhen asks important and nuanced questions about the agency of contemporary Indigenous artists and how their works are situated within today’s global society,” said Deborah Martin Kao, the Landon and Lavinia Clay Chief Curator and interim co-director of the Harvard Art Museums.
In addition to the extraordinary works of contemporary art, which are realized in a wide array of media, from paintings on bark to video, the exhibition also makes a place for historical objects from Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The inclusion of these customary objects, such as coolamons (multipurpose carrying vessels, sometimes used to cradle babies), baskets for food gathering, and larrakitj (hollow log coffins), is to demonstrate how a life is lived, measured and made meaningful through cultural objects. While the names of the makers of these objects were rarely recorded by collectors, they nonetheless possess the tangible, human residue of their makers. The exhibition invites audiences to consider the histories of erasure in past museum displays and collecting practices that have marginalized, silenced, and dehumanized Indigenous people. The exhibition also speaks to the new politics of display that are symbolically reuniting objects to their source communities where possible.
“By including these objects, we are also trying to break down the divisions between art history and anthropology,” said Gilchrist. “For Indigenous people, art and culture are both software and hardware; they need to be seen and understood together.”
Works on Display
Approximately 10 to 15 works of art will be showcased in each of the four thematic sections that make up the exhibition.
Seasonality: Forty thousand years of living culture on the continent of Australia has provided Indigenous people from Australia with a sensitive understanding of ecological patterns and celestial movements. In many parts of Australia, the solar year is regularly divided into six to eight discrete seasons, with these punctuating changes often understood as manifestations of ancestral presence. Works of art in this section explore what it means to be responsive to the natural world. They invite the viewer to observe environmental transitions and consider larger issues that shape the current cultural landscape: how we have denaturalized our relationship to the natural world, the impact of global climate change, and the ways we can re-energize our interconnectedness with the world around us. Works on display include two examples of Wanjina (c. 1980) by Alec Mingelmanganu (1905–1981); Yari country (1989), a painting by Rover Thomas (c. 1926–1998); Emily Kam Kngwarray’s (c. 1910–1996) four- panel painting Anwerlarr angerr (Big Yam) from 1996; Judy Watson’s (b. 1959) painting bunya, from
Page 3 of 10 November 12, 2015 (updated January 14, 2016)
2011; as well as three contemporary wood larrakitj, or hollow log coffins, by Yolngu artists Djambawa Marawili (b. 1953), Yumutjin Wunungmurra (b. 1953), and Djirrirra Wunungmurra (b. 1968), on loan from the Hood Museum of Art.
Transformation: The narratives told and retold by Indigenous people explain the origins of the natural world and often feature the travels of shape-shifting ancestors who metamorphosed into features of the landscape, vesting them with their sacred power. Indigenous artists create and re-create these narratives, and the sacred and significant sites associated with them, to canonize their spiritual ancestors and to re-energize their personal and cultural connection to them. The theme of transformation also applies more broadly to Indigenous art and culture, which is reimagined and reconstituted by those who create and live it. While many people erroneously associate Indigenous art and culture as being about the past, the works in this section emphasize that Indigenous people have always and continue to embrace adaptive and innovative practices. Works on display include Tommy Watson’s (born c. 1932) painting Wipu Rockhole (2004); Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s (born c. 1932) Two Women Dreaming (1990); and Manydjarri Ganambarr’s (born c. 1952) poetic bark painting Djambarrpuyngu märna (1996).
Performance: The ceremonies that Indigenous people attend and participate in are used by some Indigenous artists as the source iconography in their art. While Indigenous people continue to face ongoing challenges relating to the maintenance of cultural practice, ceremonial practices are often invoked in part by artists in the creation of their art. In a sense, art making has become a new medium of performance and the rhythm of ceremony resonates in sculptures, painted objects, and photographs. Works on display in this section include Doreen Reid Nakamarra’s (c. 1955–2009) large painting Untitled (2007), composed of thousands of small dots evoking the innumerable grains of sand that make up her desert country, as well as the rhythm and mindfulness of ceremonial performance; The Burala Rite (1972), a bark painting by Tom Djawa (1905–1980); and two woven baskets on loan from Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.
Remembrance: Creating works of art that resonate with cultural memory, the artists in this section critically reflect on history and how it configures the present. The works invite visitors to consider what we choose to remember and what, and who, we are forced to forget. Serving the exhibition’s interest in the multilayered concept of the Everywhen, these works of art highlight how we carry the past within. Through artistic excursions into the past, personal memories, national histories, and practices captured in the collections of museums can be confronted, interrogated, and sometimes laid to rest. Works on display include Vernon Ah Kee’s (b. 1967) many lies (2004), a text-based vinyl work applied directly to
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the gallery wall; Julie Gough’s (b. 1965) Dark Valley, Van Diemen’s Land (2008), a “necklace” that hangs in the shape of Tasmania and is composed of Tasmanian coal; and three photographs from Christian Thompson’s (b. 1978) We Bury Our Own series from 2012, his response to the Australian photographic collection at the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.
The artists in this exhibition demonstrate how Indigenous people can be both couriers and keepers of what has been, what is, and what will be. Their compelling visual statements condense a wealth of cultural, ritual, ecological, and historical information that undermines the discourse that relegates Indigenous people to history. The themes of the exhibition—Seasonality, Transformation, Performance, and Remembrance—reflect an experience of time that is active, abiding, and expansive. The Everywhen can show us that Indigenous art and culture do not merely represent the time before time, but in fact awaken us to the fullness of it.
Conservation Research
As part of the research and preparation for the exhibition, conservation scientists in the Harvard Art Museums’ Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies launched the first ever large-scale technical examination of Indigenous Australian bark paintings, including historic objects that served as short-term shelters in wet weather. It was commonly thought that Indigenous artists would not have used binders, but after three years, two hundred samples, and analysis of fifty paintings, there is scientific evidence to challenge that view. The team found the first conclusive evidence that orchid juice was used as a binder in two of the oldest known bark paintings, dating to the late 19th century.
“For the first time, we are able to provide physical evidence to support or challenge theories from the past about the type and presence of binders in bark paintings,” said Australian Narayan Khandekar, senior conservation scientist and director of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies.
Khandekar and his team also uncovered more information about where Indigenous artists sourced their pigments. Traditional bark painting from Arnhem Land in the far north of Australia uses only four colors—yellow, white, red, and black—derived primarily from minerals. The team analyzed and mapped the elemental composition of pigments from historic bark paintings and then compared those pigments to ochres (earthen pigments) that the team had collected while visiting Indigenous art centers in Australia and conducting artist interviews. These findings will be added to an informal “atlas” of all Australian pigment sources, contributing to a greater understanding of the extensive ochre trade among Indigenous Australians. On Groote Eylandt, an area with abundant manganese deposits, they found
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that the artists used naturally occurring black as well as black from dry cell batteries and from charcoal, indicating a nuanced choice of material.
About the Curator
Stephen Gilchrist, from the Yamatji people of the Inggarda language group from Western Australia, has curated exhibitions in Australia and the United States and has written extensively on Indigenous art from Australia. He is a leading voice in Indigenous modes of curation as a form of social practice and cultural activism. Gilchrist is currently the Australian Studies Visiting Curator at the Harvard Art Museums and associate lecturer in art history at the University of Sydney, Australia.
Over the past decade, Gilchrist has made significant contributions to the field through his work with the Indigenous Australian collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the British Museum, London; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; and the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire. He has written and contributed to important publications about Aboriginal art, including Ancestral Modern: Australian Aboriginal Art (2012) and Crossing Cultures: The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art at the Hood Museum of Art (2011). In addition, Gilchrist is on the international advisory board acting as an attaché for the 2016 Sydney Biennale.
Programming
Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia will open with a free public celebration on Thursday, February 4, 2016. This event features a discussion at 6pm about the exhibition’s central themes between curator Stephen Gilchrist and Vernon Ah Kee, one of the artists featured in the exhibition, and includes open hours in the exhibition and in all other museum galleries beginning at 5pm. A celebratory reception in the Calderwood Courtyard follows the discussion.
During the course of the exhibition, there will be lectures, including one on March 23, 2016, by Michael D. Jackson, Distinguished Visiting Professor of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. Jackson will discuss the work of Paddy Nelson Jupurrula, one of the preeminent Warlpiri artists of the Western Desert painting movement. Christian Thompson, a Bidjara artist from Queensland featured in the exhibition, will also give a lecture in the spring (details forthcoming). Events also include dance and music performances, weekly film screenings, biweekly gallery talks, and Materials Lab workshops on earth-based pigments and clay. There will also be public conversations on curatorial practice and indigeneity, as well as programmatic collaborations with Harvard University campus organizations,
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academic departments, and research centers. Detailed information about programs can be found at harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar.
Catalogue
The exhibition catalogue, published by the Harvard Art Museums and distributed by Yale University Press, will be available in February 2016. Including images of the works on display and six essays by distinguished scholars, the publication delves more deeply into the concepts proposed in the exhibition, offering a lasting look at Indigenous Australian art and paying homage to the particular traditions of specific regions of Australia. Edited by Stephen Gilchrist, the catalogue features essays by Gilchrist; Hetti Perkins, one of Australia’s most respected curators of Aboriginal art and daughter of Indigenous activist Charles Perkins; Henry F. Skerritt, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh; and Fred Myers, professor of anthropology at New York University, among others. The catalogue will be available for purchase in the Harvard Art Museums shop, located adjacent to the Calderwood Courtyard on Level 1. To inquire about ordering, visit shop.harvardartmuseums.org, call 617-495-1440, or email am_shop@harvard.edu. To request a copy for review, contact Jennifer Aubin in the museums’ Communications Division at jennifer_aubin@harvard.edu or 617-496-5331.
Acknowledgments and Credits
In Australia, special events are often opened with a Welcome to Country or Acknowledgement of Country statement to show respect to the traditional custodians of the land. To reflect that tradition here in the United States, the Harvard Art Museums, in opening this exhibition, recognize the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), along with the Nipmuc Nation and the Massachusett people, on whose land the museums stand today.
Lead support for Everywhen: The Eternal Present in Indigenous Art from Australia and related research has been provided by the Harvard Committee on Australian Studies. The exhibition is supported by the Australian Government through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Australian Consulate-General, New York. Additional support for the exhibition, catalogue, and related research has been provided by the Robert Lehman Foundation, John and Barbara Wilkerson, the American Friends of the National Gallery of Australia, Debra and Dennis Scholl, the William E. Teel African and Oceanic Arts Endowment, the Dimitri Hadzi Memorial Fund for Modern Art, and the Harvard Art Museums Mellon Publication Funds, including the Henry P. McIlhenny Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.
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Lenders include: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; Lyn and Rob Backwell, Melbourne; Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Margaret Levi and Robert Kaplan; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Milani Gallery, Brisbane; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; National Museum of Australia, Canberra; Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; John and Barbara Wilkerson; and two anonymous lenders. 


GUGGENHEIM
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SPRING 2016 PUBLIC PROGRAMS AT THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM 

In conjunction with the exhibitions Photo-Poetics: An Anthology and Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following public programs and the Sixth Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture.

Jump to: Photo-Poetics Programs | Fischli Weiss Programs | Mind’s Eye | Curators’ Eye Tours |Rosenblum Lecture | Drawing the Guggenheim
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PHOTO-POETICS: AN ANTHOLOGY PROGRAMS

Artist Panels
Wednesdays, 6:30 pm

In a series of panels, the artists featured in Photo-Poetics discuss their exhibited work and participate in a group conversation addressing themes related to photographic practices today, including issues of identity, representation, reproduction, and the circulation of images in contemporary visual culture. These discussions are part of the Elaine Terner Cooper Education Fund Conversations with Contemporary Artists series.

January 27: Lisa Oppenheim and Sara VanDerBeek

February 24: Elad Lassry, Erin Shirreff, and Kathrin Sonntag

March 9: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, and Moyra Davey

$15, $10 members, $5 other museum staff, free for students with RSVP, and includes an exhibition viewing and reception. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/cca.
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PETER FISCHLI DAVID WEISS: HOW TO WORK BETTER PROGRAMS

Film Screenings: The Least Resistance and The Right Way
Fridays–Wednesdays, February 5–April 20, 11 am, 12:30 pm, 2 pm, 3:30 pm

Two films follow Rat and Bear, the iconic alter egos of Peter Fischli and David Weiss, as they set out to strike it rich in the Los Angeles art world (The Least Resistance, 1980–81, 29 min.) and wander aimlessly through a bucolic mountainside landscape (The Right Way, 1983, 55 min.).

Free with museum admission. Screening times subject to change. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/filmscreenings.

Peter Fischli in Conversation with Hans Ulrich Obrist
Sunday, February 7, 4:30 pm
As part of the Elaine Terner Cooper Education Fund Conversations with Contemporary Artists series, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director of Exhibitions and Programmes, Serpentine Gallery, London, joins Peter Fischli to discuss his 33-year collaboration with the late David Weiss. This conversation will be the first between Fischli and Obrist to be held in New York City.

$15, $10 members, free for students with RSVP, and includes an exhibition viewing and reception. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/cca
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MIND’S EYE TOURS
Mondays, 6:30 pm
For visitors who are blind or have low vision, tours and workshops focused on the Guggenheim’s exhibitions are presented through verbal descriptions and touch.

February 1: Kandinsky Gallery

April 4: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Free with RSVP. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/mindseye.
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CURATOR’S EYE TOURS
Fridays, 12 pm
Public gallery tours of the museum’s spring exhibitions led by Guggenheim Museum curators.

February 12: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and David and Jennifer Stockman Chief Curator

February 26*: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology
Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography

March 11: Photo-Poetics: An Anthology
Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator

March 25*: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Nat Trotman, Curator, Performance and Media

April 8: Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better
Anne Wheeler, Assistant Curator

Free with museum admission. *Tours will be interpreted in American Sign Language. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
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SIXTH ANNUAL ROBERT ROSENBLUM LECTURE
Huey Copeland: Solar EthicsMonday, April 4, 6:30 pm
Since his death in 1993, the musician, writer, and composer Sun Ra has become a touchstone for many cultural producers. Huey Copeland, Associate Professor of Art History, Northwestern University, explores how Ra’s thinking points us toward new criteria for recent art that takes seriously both the recursiveness and simultaneity of time as it unfolds within and beyond the black community. The lecture is followed by a reception.

Free with RSVP. For more information, visitguggenheim.org/calendar.
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DRAWING THE GUGGENHEIM
Saturday, April 16, 10 am–1 pm
Led by Guggenheim educator Sharon Vatsky, this workshop uses drawing to study the museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright building and develop a deeper understanding of the architecture. No drawing experience required.

$20 (includes materials), $15 members. For more information, visit guggenheim.org/calendar.

Major Retrospective of László Moholy-Nagy Opens at the 

Guggenheim on May 27, 2016




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Major Retrospective of László Moholy-Nagy Opens at the Guggenheim Museum in New York on May 27, 2016, and Travels to Chicago and Los Angeles

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

View a PDF of the release.
(NEW YORK, NY, January 4, 2016)— From May 27 to September 7, 2016, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present the first comprehensive retrospective in nearly fifty years of the work of pioneering artist and educator László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946). Organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Moholy-Nagy: Future Present examines the full career of the utopian modernist who believed in the power of art and technology as a vehicle for social transformation and the betterment of humanity. Despite Moholy-Nagy’s prominence and the visibility of his work during his lifetime, few exhibitions have conveyed his experimental engagement, enthusiasm for industrial materials, and his radical innovations with movement and light. This long overdue presentation, which encompasses his multidisciplinary methodology, brings together more than 300 works drawn from public and private collections across Europe and the United States, some of which have never before been shown publicly in this country.
Each of the three organizing institutions has a history of collecting and presenting the artist’s works or a relationship to the interaction of art and technology, culminating in a comprehensive exhibition, innovative conservation efforts, and a scholarly exhibition catalogue examining Moholy-Nagy’s practice and influence. After its debut presentation in New York, the exhibition will be on view in Chicago from October 2, 2016–January 3, 2017, and in Los Angeles from February 12–June 18, 2017.
Moholy-Nagy: Future Present provides an opportunity to examine the full career of this influential Bauhaus teacher, founder of Chicago’s Institute of Design, and versatile artist who paved the way for increasingly interdisciplinary and multimedia work and practice. Among his radical innovations were experimenting with cameraless photography; using industrial materials in painting and sculpture; researching with light, transparency, and movement; working at the forefront of abstraction; and moving fluidly between the fine and applied arts. The exhibition features collages, drawings, ephemera, films, paintings, photograms, photographs, photomontages, and sculptures, underscoring a legacy of cross-disciplinary experimentation and a remarkable ability to work across mediums. As part of the exhibition, a contemporary fabrication of a space originally conceived by Moholy-Nagy in 1930, Room of the Present, will be on display at all three venues, for the first time in the United States. The space, which was not realized in Moholy-Nagy’s lifetime, contains aspects of the artist’s exhibition and product design, including a replica of his iconic kinetic Light Prop for an Electric Stage (1929–30). Room of the Presentillustrates the artist’s belief in the power of images and his approach to the various means with which to view them—a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.
Born in 1895 in Austria-Hungary (now southern Hungary), Moholy-Nagy moved to Vienna briefly and then to Berlin in 1920, where he encountered Dada artists, Russian Constructivists, and Galerie Der Sturm, where he exhibited work on several occasions. After teaching at the Bauhaus in Weimar and then Dessau in the 1920s, producing books and painting extensively across mediums, he enjoyed success in Berlin as a commercial artist, exhibition and stage designer, and typographer. Adolf Hitler’s rise to power made life increasingly difficult for the avant-garde in Germany; thus in 1934 Moholy-Nagy moved with his family to the Netherlands and then to London. Once he moved to Chicago in 1937, he never returned to Europe. In the United States, he focused on opening a school of design and made some of his most original and experimental work. He gave his full attention to American exhibition venues, showing nearly three dozen times across the United States—including in four solo shows—before his premature death from leukemia in November 1946. His interdisciplinary and investigative approach, migrating from the school to the museum or gallery space, pushed towards what he referred to as the Gesamtwerk, the total work for which he searched throughout his life.
Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Karole P. B. Vail, Associate Curator, is the Guggenheim’s organizing curator for the exhibition.
The New York presentation of Moholy-Nagy: Future Present is made possible by Lavazza. Funding is generously provided by the David Berg Foundation, The Hilla von Rebay Foundation, the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, and the Robert Lehman Foundation. The Leadership Committee for the exhibition, chaired by Peter and Dede Lawson-Johnston, is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to Achim Moeller. Additional funding is also provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.
PRESS CONTACTS:

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Sarah Eaton | Director of Media and Public Relations | 212 423 3840 |pressoffice@guggenheim.org
Kris Parker | Senior Publicist | 212 423 3840 | pressoffice@guggenheim.org

The Art Institute of Chicago
Amanda Hicks | Director of Public Affairs| 312 443 7297 | ahicks@artic.edu

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
Miranda Carroll | Communications Director | 323 857 6543 | mcarroll@lacma.org
Jessica Youn | Senior Communications Associate | 323 857 6515 |jyoun@lacma.org
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.
Location: 1071 5th Avenue (at 89th Street), New York, NY 10128 | 212 423 3500 | www.guggenheim.org
About the Art Institute of Chicago: The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879, is a world-renowned art museum housing one of the largest permanent collections in the United States. An encyclopedic museum, the Art Institute collects, preserves, and interprets works in every medium from all cultures and historical periods. With a collection of approximately 300,000 art works and artifacts, the museum has particularly strong holdings in Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting, contemporary art, early 20th century European painting and sculpture, Japanese prints, and photography. The museum’s 2009 addition, the Modern Wing, features the latest in green museum technology and 264,000 square feet dedicated to modern and contemporary art, photography, architecture and design, and new museum education facilities. In addition to displaying its permanent collection, the Art Institute mounts more than 30 special exhibitions per year and features lectures, gallery tours, and special performances on a daily basis.
Location: 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603 | 312 443 3600 |www.artic.edu
About LACMA: Since its inception in 1965, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has been devoted to collecting works of art that span both history and geography, in addition to representing Los Angeles's uniquely diverse population. Today LACMA is the largest art museum in the western United States, with a collection that includes nearly 130,000 objects dating from antiquity to the present, encompassing the geographic world and nearly the entire history of art. Among the museum’s strengths are its holdings of Asian art; Latin American art, ranging from masterpieces from the Ancient Americas to works by leading modern and contemporary artists; and Islamic art, of which LACMA hosts one of the most significant collections in the world. A museum of international stature as well as a vital part of Southern California, LACMA shares its vast collections through exhibitions, public programs, and research facilities that attract over one million visitors annually, in addition to serving millions through digital initiatives such as online collections, scholarly catalogues, and interactive engagement. LACMA is located in Hancock Park, 30 acres situated at the center of Los Angeles, which also contains the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum and the forthcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Situated halfway between the ocean and downtown, LACMA is at the heart of Los Angeles.
Location: 5905 Wilshire Boulevard (at Fairfax Avenue), Los Angeles, CA, 90036 | 323 857 6000 | lacma.org

FULLER CRAFT MUSEUM PRESENTS
First Annual Wedding Fair
Fuller Craft Museum to showcase Museum venue, vendors, craft activities, and sustainable fashion for the creative bride

Saturday, January 16, 2016, 12:00 – 4:30 pm
1:00 – 3:00 pm Sustainable Wedding Fashion on view
Emerging designer Cynthia Gu will showcase one of her lovely sustainable wedding gowns, originally shown at MIT’s 2015 Trashion Fashion show.

Entry is $10 in advance (by Sunday, January 10), $15 (January 11 and after) and includes admission to our galleries, champagne, tasty samples, tours, demos, and a swag bag. Book your wedding that day and save 10%.  The first 25 registrants will receive a set of lovely butterfly origami pins or a hand-crafted beaded bracelet.

High Resolution images of the sustainable wedding gowns, origami, event images are found at:

For the Creative Bride, For an Unforgettable Venue
Planning your wedding should be a special affair. Join us at Fuller Craft Museum for a special bridal event to see our venue space and meet with over 25 vendors (see list below). We’ll have champagne and guided tours. Don’t forget to bring your maid/matron of honor or fiancé. We will have demos for creative bachelorette party ideas. It’s a one-stop shopping opportunity. Entry is $10 in advance (by Sunday, January 10), $15 (January 11 and after) and includes admission to our galleries, champagne, tours, demos, and a swag bag. Book your wedding that day and save 10%. Want to have your shower and/or bachelorette party here as well? Book them as an add-on to save more.

About Cynthia Gu     @cynthiaguw   www.facebook.com/cynthiaguw

Cynthia Gu was recently featured in MIT’s 2015 Trashion Fashion show,http://www.trashionfashion.org/  Trashion Fashion is on a mission to contribute to a global reduction of waste through creative solutions. Gu is currently a Mechanical Engineering student at Harvard University.  She has designed and constructed a series of dresses centered around unorthodox materials, which have ranged from garbage bags to recycled homework papers. Her design methodology focuses on the unique properties of each medium in order to maximize the individuality of each dress. She utilizes her mechanical skills to manipulate the materials into a wearable and dynamic design, uniting creativity with technicality. 
High Resolution images of the sustainable wedding gowns are found at:

List of vendors to appear:
Catering                                     That's Tasty
Photography                            Black Thumb Studio
Catering                                     The Chef's Table
Photography                            Catch The Light Photography
Officiant                                    Touchstone Ceremonies
Photography                            Amanda MacDonald Photography
DJ/Sound                                  DJ Joe Lupica
Stationery/ paper                                     Yeiou
Photography/ DJ/ Video            Memory Works Productions
Officiant                                    April Ward-Stanbrook
Catering                                     East Meets West
Musician                                   Bella Music
Photography/ Stationery           EM Letterpress
stationery/ paper                                     Arbalest Press 
Catering                                     David's Catering and Events       
Photography/ Video                   Shining light films
stationery/ paper                                     Masscribes
makeup                                     Mary Kay -Mary Pollard
Planner                                      Triple berry events
Catering                                     Cypress Catering
Catering/ staffing                   Simply Serving II LLC
Catering                                     Tasteful Adventures
  Florist                                         Holmes-McDuffy
  Photography                                        SK Photography
                                                    Stonybrook Fine Arts
                             

Current Exhibitions at Fuller Craft

Toothpick World: From Sliver to Skyline
December 19, 2015 – March 27, 2016
Toothpick World: Build and Play Family Day,  Sunday, January 17, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Paul J. Smith Portraits: A Photographic Journal of the Studio Craft Community
October 3, 2015 – February 28, 2016

Art as Quilt: Transitions in Contemporary Textile Media Studio Art Quilt Associates
October 3, 2015 – January 17, 2016

holidaySHOP 
November 21, 2015 – January 10, 2016

Mark Davis: Icarus Ongoing

Traditions and Innovations: Fuller Craft Museum Collects
Ongoing, rotating selections of the permanent collection

Coming Soon to Fuller Craft

Material Witness: Joan Pearson Watkins: Potter, Educator, and Collector
January 23 – April 17, 2016

Paper and Blade: Modern Paper Cutting
February 20 – July 24, 2016

Visions from the Lathe: Selections from the Massachusetts South Shore Woodturners
March 12, 2016 – June 12, 2016

Mary Merrill Tapestries  March 19 – April 17, 2016

The Faces of Politics: In/Tolerance
April 16 – August 21, 2016

CounterCraft: Voices of the Indie Craft Community  May 7, 2016 – July 10, 2016

Unbound: The Art of Altered Books
July 23 – November 20, 2016

(413): Pioneering Western Massachusetts August 13, 2016 – November 6, 2016 

Old Sole of the New Machine: Steampunk Brockton – Reimagining Shoe City
September 10, 2016 – January 1, 2017

About Fuller Craft Museum Fuller Craft Museum, New England’s only museum of contemporary craft, is dedicated to the objects, ideas, and insight that inspire both patrons and artists to explore life through the art of contemporary craft. Fuller Craft Museum is located at 455 Oak St. in Brockton, MA. The Museum is open Tuesdaythrough Sunday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, with free admission for all Thursdays from 5:00 – 9:00 pm. Admission is $8 adults, $5 seniors and students, free for members and children 12 and under. For more information on Fuller Craft exhibitions and events please visit www.fullercraft.org (http://www.fullercraft.org/) or call 508.588.6000. Fuller Craft Museum, New England’s home for contemporary craft.
GUGGENHEIM
Curators Hou Ranru and Xiaoyu Weng
GUGGENHEIM ADVANCES CONTEMPORARY CHINESE ART INITIATIVE WITH APPOINTMENT OF CURATORS HOU HANRU AND XIAOYU WENG

Curators to organize two exhibitions of commissioned works for The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative
(NEW YORK, NY—AUGUST 12, 2015)—The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation strengthened its longstanding commitment to the study and support of contemporary Chinese artists with the appointment of Hou Hanru as Consulting Curator, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, and Xiaoyu Weng as The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art. Led by Alexandra Munroe, the Guggenheim’s Samsung Senior Curator of Asian Art and newly named Senior Advisor, Global Arts, they will work as a team to develop the next two exhibitions scheduled as part of The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, which was launched in 2013. The next exhibition, a thematic group show of newly commissioned works, will open at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in November 2016.

View the full release.

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Photos: Courtesy of Hou Hanru; Wenxin Zhang



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    of art and learn Chinese in a fun, creative environment.
    .
     
  • ADULTS: China Institute offers a wide range
    of language classes for students at every
    proficiency level, from beginner to Business
    Chinese!We also offer calligraphy, brushpainting
    and Tai Chi classes, and private tutoring at the convenience of your home or office!
                  

educationEducation & Family

China Institute offers a
wide range of Language
and Studio Classes
Sept. 28th - Dec. 17th
Register Now!Beyond the classroom, students enjoy immeasurable access to Chinese language and culture, through social events, art, gallery exhibitions, and more.
  Learn More


Upper East Side
Open House
September 19, 2015Adult Language
& Studio 
Learn More


Send your child to China Institute for an unparalleled experience with Chinese Language and Culture!
Kids & Teens
After-school Program

Sept. 28th - Feb. 1st
Register Now!Tailored for different age groups ranging from 2 to 17, the Children's After-school Program offers instruction of Chinese language and culture in an exciting and interactive environment.

Upper East Side
Open House
September 19, 2015Kids & Teens
After-school Classes
Learn More



Join Us This Fall!
We're Offering a wide array of Professional Development Workshops
 





Fall 2015  



Our PD Workshops 

provide key concepts and examines issues related to curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. 




Downtown Educator
Open House

September 29, 2015
4:00-6:00PM

China Institute
welcomes educators to
our new downtown home!















Workshop


Discover China Through Art (DCTA) 

Monday, September 28 - December 18
Join Us! This fall, DCTA, our art education program
for Groups, will present a special Chinese calligraphy workshop. Through a video presentation and an experimental ink and brush calligraphy workshop, participants will learn about the history of
Chinese characters



Fall Family Festival: 
Saturday, September 12th
10:30AM - 3:00PM

Celebrate Chinese Culture!

 Since we're all moved in, we'd like to properly introduce ourselves, and celebrate fall with our
new friends and family! Bring your loved ones
as we make arts and crafts, take part in a
food-demonstration, learn to speak
Chinese, and so much more! 


Early Life of Yuan Shikai and the
Formation of the Yuan Family

Saturday, September 19th
2:00PM - 4:30PM

Come experience the early life of Yuan Shikai before
his rise to political prominence; the family structure of the Yuan family during and after Yuan's time;
and the lives of more prominent Yuan sons 

and daughters in the second and
third generations.







Book Launch and Lecture:
Peach Blossom Fan  

Thursday, September 24th
6:30PM - 8:00PM 


China Institute proudly joins New York
Review Books to celebrate the publication of
Chen Shih-hsiang and Harold Acton's lively translation of K'ung Shang-jen's

The Peach Blossom Fan. Narrated by
our very own Ben Wang.


China and the West
during World War II: A Confucius
Institute Day Celebration

Saturday, September 26th
2:00PM - 6:00PM 
Join us for two lectures with Daniel Jackson
and Professor Steve Hochstadt, exploring
China's relationship with the West
during World War II. 

Culinary Program

Gourmet Cuisine Circle
Wednesday, September 30,  6:30PM
Please join us in celebrating delicious Chinese cuisine with friends!This program features a XiaoLongBao (Soup Dumpling) tasting, paired with cocktails! Come taste the innovative XLB
from an internationally trained chef, and have the opportunity to
vote for your favorites.The tasting will be followed by other savory Chinese dishes. 








businessprogramsBusiness Programs
China Impact Speakers


China's Financial Markets:
On Track or Off the Rails

Guest Speakers:
 

Jim Chanos & Ted Wang
Tuesday, September 22, 12:00PM - 2:00PM
Join us for this timely and dynamic discussion on China's financial markets. Jim Chanos, Founder
and Managing Partner, Kynikos Associates.
Ted Wang, CIO of Puissance Capital and former
Partner of Goldman, Sachs & Co.








specialeventsSpecial Events


Brooklyn Book Festival Children's Day
Saturday, September 19th
10:00AM - 4:00PM

For it's 10th Anniversary, the Brooklyn 

Book Festival is presenting a Children's Day
for children ages 2 to 11. Come join us at China Institute's booth where we will have fun activities
for our We All Live in the Forbidden City books!


Festival: 
Sunday, September 20th
12:00PM - 6:00PM

Join Us For 92Y Street Fest!

Celebrate with individuals from all over the world;
as we connect through culture, art, and entertainment. Be sure to stop by China Institute's table, where we'll offer fun family activities! 





Dear Chutze,

You are invited, on behalf of Wang Qingsong, to this event during Art Basel Hong Kong.

The first edition of Changjiang International Photography & Video Biennale invites you to its press conference
at 2pm on March 15 at the Pool House, 11th Floor of Grand Hyatt, Hong Kong.

This event will announce the launch of the upcoming opening on April 26, 2015 of the first edition of Changjiang International Photography & Video Biennale, organized by Chongqing Changjiang Museum of Contemporary Art (CCMCA) (will be on view for three months).  Alejandro Castellote (Spain), Francois Hebel (France) and
Wang Qingsong (China) are the chief curators for this 2015 Biennale. 


If your media colleagues attending Art Basel Hong Kong may be interested in attending, please feel free to share this invitation with them.

Thank you for your consideration, more info continues below for you.

Jose Lima & William Spring
News Travels Fast
305/910-7762


For more information/media contact:
Zhang Fang: 0086-139-1084-8410

Exhibition organization:

Chief Curators:  
-- Alejandro Castellote (Spain )
-- Francois Hebel (France)
-- Wang Qingsong (China)
-- Chairman:  Chen Huijiang
-- Executive Director: Zou Ling
-- Producer:   Tian Dong
-- Overseas Organizer: Zhang Fang
-- Artistic Director:  Zhou Neng
-- Exhibition Promotion: Wang Zheng, Yang Xianjin, Xiao Anqi, Yang Xueqiong
-- Media Promotion: Tang Li, Yang Jing
-- Academic / Artistic Director: Zhou Neng
-- Academic Support: Yuan Yi, Zhou Wanlu
-- Curatorial Assistant: Luo Yong, Peng Hao
The first edition of Changjiang International Photography & Video Biennale is organized by Chongqing Changjiang Museum of Contemporary Art (CCMCA) which will open on April 26, 2015 and last for three months. We are fortunate to invite Alejandro Castellote (Spain), Francois Hebel (France) and Wang Qingsong (China) to be the chief curators for this Biennale. 
The Biennale will explore the theme of “Real/Unreal” and deliberate on if photography and video can accurately document the past, interpret the reality during this fast-paced transformation epoch and enlighten us for future vision. 
On the Theme “Real/Unreal
Photography was the major invention in the 19th century. Because of its accurate quality of documenting the reality, it exerted an influential impact against the then popular classic painting, hence perturbing the tradition of classic painting arena.

However, as a matter of fact, simply because of the invention of photography, painting itself launched its own revolution which accelerated the outcome of impressionism and cubism for the artistic development in the recent era. 
After around one hundred and seventy years, digital photography in the late 1950s catapulted the development of image technology. Enriched by the rise of high-definition digital camera, photography created differences in itself which raised further doubts about the validity of true or false, real and unreal, right and wrong …

With the continuous development of cellular phones and internet, the old-fashioned image production concepts/technologies are put out of the attention. This internal revolution creates a similarity to the embarrassing situation of the classic painting over one hundred and seventy years. 
The theme Real/Unreal will explore the future of photography and video, challenging our new vision into the evolution of image production for the foreseeable future. 
There will be three sections for this Biennale. The thematic exhibition will be chaired by the three curators who will invite over one hundred artists.

The Teacher + Student Exhibition will invite two professors and two students recommended by their teachers from the ten renowned Chinese art academies (40 artists in total).

The Symposium will be attended by both domestic and international photographic and video scholars and artists. 
Awards:
-- Top Award:  one person, 150,000 RMB
-- Silver Award:  one person, 50,000 RMB
-- Bronze Award:  one person, 20,000 RMB
-- Honorary Prize:  three persons, 10,000 RMB each

Selection of the awards: The awardees will be selected by the participating scholars, critics and media as well as artists through anonymous votes.
Bios of the chief curators:
Alejandro Castellote (Born in 1959, Spain. Lives in Peru.)
In 1982 he started to curate photography exhibitions. Between 1985 and 1996, he directed the Photography Department at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid. He was the artistic director and founder of the PhotoEspaña in Madrid from 1998 to 2000. He has been guest curator for Latin American Photoquai, curator for the first three editions of the Getxo Photo Festival, guest curator of Singapore International Photography Festival in 2012, curator of Daegu Photo Biennale in Korea.
Francois Hebel (Born in 1958. Lives in Paris, France)
He works since 35 years ago with photographers, producing exhibitions, books and events. He was 15 years artistic director for Recontres de la Photographie Arles, France, 12 years director For Magnum Photo Agency, and is currently artistic director of many projects around the world including Foto/Industria in Bologna Italy, and the Caribbean Image Festival at la Guadeloupe in the French Antilles. 
Wang Qingsong (Born in 1966. Lives in Beijing)
Since 1996, he engaged in photography. Solo exhibitions have been organized at the International Center for Photography (ICP), NYC; Guangdong Art Museum, Frost Art Museum, Miami, Daegu Art Museum, Korea. Group exhibitions include Venice Biennale, Istanbul Biennale, Kiev Biennale, Shanghai Biennale and etc.
Brief Introduction to the Organizer:
Situated on Changjiang Art Square on South Binglu Road, Chongqing Changjiang Museum of Contemporary Art (CCMCA) has an overall construction area of 22,000 square meters, including 8 professional exhibition rooms as large as 12,000 square meters in total. It is equipped with such facilities as simultaneous academic auditorium, VIP room, high-definition multi-functional showroom and etc. CCMCA is dedicated to presenting the diversity of contemporary art with possibilities of various experiments with an avant-garde edge. 
The chief goal of CCMCA targets at introducing worldwide contemporary art works to Chongqing, keeping cultural and artistic exchanges between Chongqing and the world, and developing into an influential and unique public art museum.

Guggenheim Museum and Foundation Welcomes 

Sarah Eaton as Director, Media and Public Relations


Download a PDF of this news release.
(NEW YORK, NY, March 12, 2015)—Richard Armstrong, Director, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, today announced the appointment of Sarah Eaton as Director, Media and Public Relations. Under the leadership of Tina Vaz, Acting Deputy Director, Global Communications, Eaton will oversee the planning and implementation of strategic media relations, communications, and other outreach efforts for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation.
“Sarah comes to the Guggenheim with a rich and deep background in the communication of ideas across media and cultures,” said Richard Armstrong. “She will play a key role in amplifying and enriching how we communicate our exploration of modern and contemporary art, and how we engage with audiences locally and globally.”
As Director, Media and Public Relations, Eaton will lead media and public relations strategy for the programs and activities of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. She will also contribute to the global communications strategy for the foundation, including collaborating with colleagues at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, and, in the future, the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. She will begin her new position on March 20.
Eaton most recently served as Director of Media Relations at Sundance Institute, the thirty-four-year-old, global nonprofit dedicated to supporting artists working in film, theater, and new media. During her time there, she was responsible for publicity, social media, and strategic messaging for the Institute’s full range of initiatives, including the annual Sundance Film Festival, Sundance London, Sundance Film Festival—Hong Kong Selects, and Sundance NEXT FEST (a film and music festival in Los Angeles). Eaton also was responsible for overseeing media relations for the Sundance Institute’s Lab and artist development programs, foundation supported programs, corporate sponsorship, and public events. Previously, Eaton was Senior Vice President of Communications for Sundance Channel (now SundanceTV), where she created, executed, and managed network communications strategy and media relations activities across all business areas. Prior to Sundance Channel, Eaton worked in public and media relations for specialized theatrical film distributors, October Films and Fine Line Features. Earlier in her career, she worked in media relations at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997), and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.View in: web browser



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GUGGENHEIM
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Guggenheim Museum Schedule of Exhibitions Through Early 2016

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents the following upcoming exhibitions. View the full exhibition schedule onlinePlease note the information below is subject to change. 
CURRENT AND UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

On Kawara—Silence 

Through May 3, 2015

The Hugo Boss Prize 2014: Paul Chan, Nonprojections for New Lovers
March 6–May 13, 2015

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Infinite Possibility.
Mirror Works and Drawings 1974–2014

March 13–June 3, 2015

A Year with Children 2015
May 1–June 17, 2015

Storylines: Contemporary Art at the Guggenheim
June 5–September 9, 2015

Doris Salcedo
June 26–October 12, 2015

Alberto Burri: The Trauma of Painting
October 9, 2015–January 6, 2016

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology
November 20, 2015–February 17, 2016

Peter Fischli David Weiss: A Retrospective (working title)
February–May 2016

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present
June–September 2016

ALSO ON VIEW

Kandinsky Before Abstraction, 1901–1911
Through April 1, 2015

A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion

The Thannhauser Collection

GLOBAL EXHIBITIONS

Seeing Through Light: Selections from the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Collection
Manarat Al Saadiyat Cultural District, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Through March 26, 2015

Guggenheim Helsinki Now
Kunsthalle Helsinki, Nervanderinkatu 3, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
April 25–May 16, 2015


View the full exhibition schedule.

#1383
March 4, 2015 
PO-PressImages
guggenheim.org/pressimages
User ID: photoservice
Password: presspass


PO-Contact

Lauren Van Natten
Associate Director
Media and Public Relations

Kris Parker
Senior Publicist

Molly Stewart
Publicist

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
212 423 3840
pressoffice@guggenheim.org


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PEM’s popular Lunar New Year celebration returns
Full day of FREE activities Saturday, February 28
SALEM, MA — The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) presents one of its most popular annual festivals. The Chinese Lunar New Year celebration returns on Saturday, February 28. A full day of festivities include traditional lion dances, music and drumming and art making.
Explore Yin Yu Tang, a Chinese house that sheltered one family in the Huizhou region of China for more than 200 years and the exhibition Double Happiness: Celebration in Chinese Art. With more than 30 highlights from the museum's wide-ranging Chinese collection spanning 3,000 years, this exhibition celebrates China's artistic achievements crystallized in seasonal festivals, religious ceremonies and celebrations. Discover plants and animals, myths and symbols and decipher the Chinese character for "Double Happiness."
The Chinese Lunar New Year is a 15-day celebration marking the start of the new year. Each year coincides with one of 12 zodiac animals and this year’s animal is the goat. People born in a goat year are believed to be calm, smart, creative and dependable.

Saturday, February 28 | 10 am-4 pm | All programs FREE with museum admission
For reservations, please call 978-745-9500, ext. 3011
10 am - 4 pm | DROP-IN ART ACTIVITY | Studio 1, Create Space
Lucky Lanterns
The Lunar New Year celebration in China ends with the Lantern Festival. Design your own with local artist, author and illustrator Jennifer DeCristoforo. She was inspired to develop the Lucky Bamboo Book of Crafts to share a connection with her adopted Chinese daughter’s native culture.

11 - 11:45 am | PERFORMANCES | Atrium
Gund Kwok: Lion Dance
Kick off PEM’s Lunar New Year celebration with a lion dance performance by Gund Kwok, the only all-women lion dance group in the country. The Gund Kwok Lion Cubs, a group of 6- to 9-year-olds who have mastered the lion dance skills, get the festivities started.  
Noon and 2 pm | Chinese Dulcimer Guzheng Youth Band | Morse Auditorium
Join us for two 40-minute performances by young musicians who have mastered ancient Chinese string instruments. A nonprofit organization founded in 2007, the band promotes Chinese instrumental music and culture in the United States and seeks to improve children's appreciation of Chinese music.
Noon - 12:30 pm and 2 - 2:30 pm  | INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCES | East India Marine Hall
Ribbon Dance
Watch professional dancer Liwen Wang demonstrate the art of ribbon dancing. Then join the fun and learn some moves as she invites audience members to take part in a short ribbon dance. 
 
12:30 - 1 pm and 2:30 - 3 pm  | INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCES | East India Marine Hall
Boston Synchrony Chinese Percussion Ensemble 
Learn more about Chinese percussion from musician, teacher and conductor Chi-Sun Chan. Then have a go on the gongs, cymbals and drums.

1-3 pm | GALLERY SPOT | Level 2 Gallery
Up Close with Silk
Drop by the exhibition Fish, Silk, Tea, Bamboo: Cultivating an Image of China to meet a museum educator and explore this elegant material.
1-1:45 pm | Chinese Folk Art Workshop | Atrium
Members of The Chinese Folk Art Workshop, all between the ages of 12 and 18, perform traditional Chinese dances. Also see another lion dance, drumming and the diabolo (a traditional Chinese yo-yo) in action.
1-3 pm | ART CART | Ground Level Gallery
Double Happiness: Celebration in Chinese Art
Drop by and get hands on in the galleries! Explore more with our interactive Art Cart. Touch objects, experiment with art-making techniques and discover stories about the art around you.

3 pm | FILM | Morse Auditorium
Little Shaolin Monks (2007, 45 minutes, in Chinese with English subtitles)
Recommended for ages 10 and up | Seats are first-come, first-served
Peek into the mysterious world of these 6- to 9-year-olds who live in the Shaolin Temple and practice the highest form of martial arts.

IMAGE CAPTION AND CREDIT
Learn the steps of a traditional Chinese ribbon dance. Photo by Walter Silver/PEM.

SPONSOR
This program is made possible by the Lowell Institute.
ABOUT THE PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM
The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) is one of the oldest and fastest growing museums in North America. At its heart is a mission to enrich and transform people's lives by broadening their perspectives, attitudes and knowledge of themselves and the wider world. PEM celebrates outstanding artistic and cultural creativity through exhibitions, programming and special events that emphasize cross-cultural connections, integrate past and present and underscore the vital importance of creative expression. Founded in 1799, the museum's collection is among the finest of its kind, boasting superlative works from around the globe and across time -- including American art and architecture, Asian export art, photography, maritime art and history, as well as Native American, Oceanic and African art. PEM's campus affords a varied and unique visitor experience with hands-on creativity zones, interactive opportunities, performance spaces and historic properties, including Yin Yu Tang: A Chinese House, a 200-year-old house that is the only example of Chinese domestic architecture on display in the United States. HOURS: Open Tuesday-Sunday, 10 am5 pm and the third Thursday of every month until 9 pm. Closed Mondays (except holidays), Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. ADMISSION: Adults $18; seniors $15; students $10. Additional admission to Yin Yu Tang: $5. Members, youth 16 and under and residents of Salem enjoy free general admission and free admission to Yin Yu Tang. INFO: Call 866‐745‐1876 or visit pem.org
MEDIA CONTACTS
Whitney Van Dyke | Senior Press Officer | whitney_vandyke@pem.org | 978-542-1828
Dinah Cardin | Press Officer / Special Projects Writer | dinah_cardin@pem.org | 978-542-1830



Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East

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Boook cover showing photo pf Chiang Yee and Chiang's illustration of geese flying in formation
Professor Da Zheng's book is a cultural biography of Chiang Yee, whose illustration of geese in flight is part of the exhibit, courtesy of the Boston Athenaeum.
The Adams Gallery at Suffolk University presents artwork from an exiled 20th century Chinese artist-author in the exhibit Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East. The exhibit is focused on illustrations from Chiang Yee’s 1959 travel book about Boston.
Chiang Yee left China at age 30 for to study in England, but revolution, wars and a yearning for a meaningful life kept him away from home and family for four decades. During this time, Chiang Yee wrote more than 20 books, including the popular Silent Traveller series.
In a voice both philosophical and humorous, Chiang Yee’s Silent Traveller books offer an outsider’s observation of locations from London and Paris to Boston and Japan. They are generously illustrated with Yee’s watercolors and pen-and-ink drawings, which render scenes of the West in the Chinese manner.
The Adams Gallery presents original Chiang Yee drawings and watercolors, reproductions of illustrations from his Silent Traveller book on Boston from the Boston Athenaeum’s collection and photographs of the artist-author.

Kindred spirits

The Chiang Yee exhibit was inspired by Suffolk University English Professor Da Zheng’s cultural biography of the same title. Zheng, like Yee, was born in China but moved to the West to pursue higher education. Though of different generations, the two educators shared a fascination with art, literature and education.
Zheng first learned of Chiang Yee from the artist’s English-language book on calligraphy, initially published in 1938. Zheng, then studying in Shanghai, worked with friends to translate the volume into Chinese.
Zheng moved to the United States in 1986. He came upon a copy of The Silent Traveller in Boston, with a cover image of Park Street Church.
“I saw the name Chiang Yee and was amazed,” said Zheng. “I didn’t know that the author of Chinese Calligraphy was also a travel writer.”
Zheng’s research is focused on Chinese-American literature, and Yee, who covered art, travel, memoir and children’s stories in more than 25 published books, made a fascinating subject.

Outside looking in

Zheng’s book, Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East, is a cultural study of a man who spent more than half his life in the West writing and illustrating a series of travel books from the point of view of an outsider looking in.
“This is a book I really put my heart into,” said Zheng. “To a large extent I was writing about someone like myself.”
The book was published in English and later in Chinese. Since its publication, several of Chiang Yee’s Silent Traveller books also have been translated into Chinese.
Yee was a close friend of historian and Boston Athenaeum Director Walter Muir Whitehill, and the illustrations for The Silent Traveller in Boston are now in the Athenaeum’s collection. The Athenaeum has allowed the University to reproduce them for the Adams Gallery exhibit.
The exhibit Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East, celebrating both the author of the Silent Traveller books and Zheng’s comprehensive study of his life and times, will run through March 22, 2015.
Chiang Yee: The Silent Traveller from the East
Feb. 13—March 22, 2015
Adams Gallery
David J. Sargent Hall
Suffolk University Law School
120 Tremont Street, Boston
Gallery hours: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. daily
617-305-1782
www.suffolk.edu/adamsgallery

 finalist grid new

Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition Exhibition, Guggenheim Helsinki Now, Presents Top Submissions, April 25–May 16 at the Kunsthalle Helsinki


The public is invited to review and discuss the six finalist designs, as well as honorable mentions selected by the competition jury
Exhibition:Guggenheim Helsinki Now
Venue:Kunsthalle Helsinki, Nervanderinkatu 3, 00100 Helsinki, Finland
Dates:April 25–May 16, 2015

Download the press release in EnglishFinnish, or Swedish.
(HELSINKI, February 12, 2015)—From April 25 to May 16, 2015, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation will present the free, public exhibition Guggenheim Helsinki Now at the Kunsthalle Helsinki in Finland. Augmented by a series of talks, events, and performances designed to engage a range of age groups, the exhibition will reveal to the public for the first time the final designs submitted by the six finalist teams in the Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition, as well as fifteen designs awarded honorable mentions by the jury. Visitors to the exhibition also will be invited to explore interactive installations that present analyses and interpretations of the data compiled from all 1,715 submissions to the competition.
Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, stated, “Like the competition, this exhibition is meant to do more than show what architectural form a Guggenheim museum might take in Helsinki. It is an opportunity for a broad audience to consider a range of possible futures for a critical area of the Helsinki waterfront, with art and architecture at the heart of those scenarios. We invite the public to join us in imagining the museum of the future, discussing the issues that these designs have raised, and diving into the kind of thinking that the jury will be doing as it prepares to select the winning design.”
“Guggenheim Helsinki is not yet a physical place, but it is already providing a compelling medium for contemplating the present and future of architecture and the role of a twenty-first-century museum,” said Ari Wiseman, Deputy Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. “Through the exhibition and related community and education programs, we aim to offer a clear and compelling example of the multifaceted public engagement that is at the core of the Guggenheim’s mission and that we hope to develop and advance in new ways in Helsinki.”
Guggenheim Helsinki Now presents a snapshot of the competition at this key milestone in its timeline, chronicling its history and projecting its potential outcomes. By drawing on the historic global response to the competition, the exhibition also will provide insights into the state of architecture today. In addition to spotlighting the final proposals of the six shortlisted architecture firms and the fifteen honorable mentions, the exhibition will present collaborative works by Finnish and American designers and technologists who have used digital methods to analyze and interpret the robust archive of submissions as a platform for stimulating discussion and collecting public feedback.
Guggenheim Helsinki Now is curated by Troy Conrad Therrien, Curator for Architecture and Digital Initiatives, with Ashley Mendelsohn, Project Assistant, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
“The Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition is a catalyst to think differently,” said Therrien. “The six finalists were selected for demonstrating their ability to do so by a jury that operated in the same spirit. The exhibition is designed to carry this mantle forward, going beyond the role of simply presenting to creating an active form of engagement and interface with the citizens of Helsinki.”
The exhibition will present the final 3D building models and drawings developed by the six finalist teams: AGPS Architecture Ltd. (Zurich, Switzerland, and Los Angeles, United States of America), Asif Khan Ltd. (London, United Kingdom), Fake Industries Architectural Agonism (New York, United States of America; Barcelona, Spain; and Sydney, Australia), Haas Cook Zemmrich STUDIO2050 (Stuttgart, Germany), Moreau Kusunoki Architectes (Paris, France), and SMAR Architecture Studio (Madrid, Spain, and Western Australia), as well as work from the designers selected for honorable mentions by the jury.
Jan Förster, Director, Kunsthalle Helsinki, stated, “Kunsthalle Helsinki has always strived to be topical and to ignite public discussion. The Kunsthalle has not hosted an exhibition on architecture for a while now, so it is great that the Guggenheim Foundation has chosen it to be the venue for showcasing the results of an international design competition. We look forward to the additional programming the Guggenheim has produced for this exhibition.”
Competition Next Steps
Following the exhibition, the jury will meet in Helsinki to select the winning design. The winning design will be announced in June 2015, with an award of €100,000 (approximately $136,000) for the first-place team and €55,000 (approximately $75,000) for each runner-up.
Team Biographies AGPS Architecture Ltd.
was founded in 1984 and is led by principals Marc Angélil, Sarah Graham, and Manuel Scholl. Among its recent notable projects are the Portland Aerial Tram in Portland, Oregon; the Children’s Museum of Los Angeles; the B35 Apartment Building in Zurich; Dock Midfield, Zurich International Airport; the Zurich International School; a headquarters extension of the International Union for Conservation of Nature in Gland-Geneva; and an urban upgrading project in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Fake Industries Architectural Agonism 
was founded in 2007 by principals Urtzi Grau (who currently teaches at the Princeton School of Architecture and Cooper Union) and Cristina Goberna (who currently teaches at Columbia University). Dedicated to the proposition that public potential remains unexplored in the existing built environment, the firm has produced or reproduced a variety of exhibitions, writings, and proposals, as well as projects that include a new velodrome for the City of Medellín and Superphosphates, a master plan for the nineteenth-century mining village of Aldea Moret in the west of Spain.
Haas Cook Zemmrich STUDIO2050
was founded in 2012 by principals Martin Haas, David Cook, and Stephan Zemmrich in Stuttgart, Germany. Notable projects in Germany include the City Quarter T5 in Mannheim; Alnatura headquarters in Darmstadt; Geometry Global headquarters in Hamburg; the Rheinschloss Wohnturm, a new entrance to the town of Waldshut (currently under construction); and the redesign of the Kulturhaus Karlstorbahnhof in Heidelberg (in progress).
Moreau Kusunoki Architectes
was founded in 2012 by principals Kusunoki Hiroko and Nicolas Moreau. Notable projects include the new Théâtre du Beauvaisis; the Fonds Régional d’Art Contemporain in Marseille; the Matsuri Boëtie Restaurant in Paris; and the plaza for the new Palais de Justice designed by Renzo Piano at the Porte de Clichy in Paris.
SMAR Architecture Studio
was founded in 2007 by principal Fernando Jerez. Built projects include Scaffolder (2006) for the Horizons of Public Housing exhibition in Madrid; a series of sustainable pavilions for exhibitions and fairs presented in Madrid and Barcelona from 2006 through 2011 (Paper Pavilion, Polyester Pavilion, Spiber Pavilion, Garden Pavilion); and Pipe House in Madrid (2013), a conversion of an industrial building to housing with minimal cost and intervention.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development). Looking to the future, the Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that take contemporary art, architecture, and design beyond the walls of the museum, including with the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and with The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative. More information about the foundation can be found atguggenheim.org.
About Kunsthalle Helsinki
Completed in 1928, Kunsthalle Helsinki has been used as an exhibition space throughout its history. The focus of the exhibitions is on contemporary art but the exhibition program also includes design and architecture. Kunsthalle Helsinki does not have a collection of its own, but serves as a venue for changing exhibitions.
Designed by architects Hilding Ekelund (1893–1984) and Jarl Eklund (1876–1962), Kunsthalle Helsinki is a prime example of 1920s classicism and a prime example of this style in Finland. The building itself is protected and defined as a culturally and historically important architectural monument.
The Kunsthalle Helsinki is run by a private foundation supported by various artist and art organizations, including the Finnish Association of Architects (SAFA), the Finnish Association of Designers Ornamo, and the City of Helsinki.
For more information, visit taidehalli.fi/en.

Guggenheim to Host 2015 Young Collectors Party on March 19


A Benefit to Support the Acquisition of Contemporary Works for the Museum’s Collection with Music by DJ Afrika Bambaataa

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(New York, NY – February 9, 2015) — The Guggenheim Museum will host the 2015 Guggenheim Young Collectors Party on Thursday, March 19 to benefit the Young Collectors Council (YCC). An intimate dinner with YCC co-chairs and the host committee will be held in the Wright restaurant at 7 pm, and will be followed by a celebration with dessert and drinks in the museum’s rotunda at 9 pm. Funds raised from the evening will benefit the Young Collectors Council Art Fund to support the acquisition of works by emerging artists for the museum’s contemporary collection. Major support of the 2015 Young Collectors Party is provided by David Yurman.
Guests will have an opportunity to view current exhibitions On Kawara—Silenceand Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Infinite Possibility. Mirror Works and Drawings 1974-2014. DJ Afrika Bambaataa will play music for dancing throughout the night. A pioneer of late 1970s and early 1980s hip-hop in the Bronx, Afrika Bambaataa gained popularity with his impressive turntable techniques and original combination of hip-hop and techno-pop beats, paving the way for the style of hip-hop and rap today.
Chairs of the 2015 Young Collectors Party are Sarah Arison, Nell Diamond, and Alexandra Economou, with honorary co-chairs Evan and Ku-Ling Yurman. Young Collectors Council co-chairs include Noreen K. Ahmad, Astrid T. Hill, Anne Huntington, and Dan Tanzilli. Guests include artists whose work is represented in the Guggenheim Collection, such as Kevin Beasley, Gerard & Kelly, Agnieszka Kurant, Ken Okiishi, and Adam Pendleton, as well as members of the host committee, including Evangelo Bousis, Kyle Hotchkiss Carone, Alexandra Chemla, Selby Drummond, Prabal Gurung, Sarah Hoover, Bee Shaffer, Cameron Silver, and Ines Toledano.
Guggenheim Young Collectors Council members receive priority access and discounted tickets. Tickets are $250 ($200 for YCC members) for the party and will be available to the public beginning February 9. For tickets and more information, visit guggenheim.org/yccparty.
About the YCC
The Young Collectors Council (YCC) is a dynamic leadership group for young professionals ages 21–40 who seek to further their understanding of contemporary art and culture. Members connect with artists of our time, prominent collectors, and leading figures in the art world through monthly programs of educational and social events designed by the museum's curators. An integral part of the YCC is the Acquisitions Committee, a unique opportunity for members to meet twice a year to vote on new acquisitions for the museum’s contemporary collection. Over the last 17 years the YCC has supported the acquisition of more than 130 works for the museum.
About the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Founded in 1937, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is dedicated to promoting the understanding and appreciation of art, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, through exhibitions, education programs, research initiatives, and publications. The Guggenheim network that began in the 1970s when the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, was joined by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, has since expanded to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (opened 1997) and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi (currently in development).The Guggenheim Foundation continues to forge international collaborations that celebrate contemporary art, architecture, and design within and beyond the walls of the museum, including the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation. More information about the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation can be found at guggenheim.org.



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GUGGENHEIM
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Guggenheim Premieres Performances by Wang Jianwei on February 12 and 13

Spiral Ramp Library Presented in Conjunction with Final Weeks of Artist’s Multidisciplinary Exhibition 

PERFORMANCE
Spiral Ramp Library 

Thursday, February 12 and Friday, February 13, 8 pm

Spiral Ramp Library is a key component to Wang Jianwei’s multidisciplinary exhibition and commission Time Temple that features sculpture, painting, and film, and which has been on view at the museum since October 31. Conceived as the closing ceremony of the exhibition and the first commission for The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative, Spiral Ramp Library explores the nature of human knowledge and spaces of learning, such as the museum and the theater, which allow for the circulation of contemporary thought and experience.

Consisting of contemporary dance, theater, sound, and installation works, Wang Jianwei’s performance is based on the recordings of his sound performance that was made during the exhibition’s opening reception in the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda. During this recording, twenty orators spoke on ten topics, including Argentina, Jorge Luis Borges, climate, disappearance, Gnosticism, the Guggenheim Museum, library, map, universe, and Frank Lloyd Wright. Wang Jianwei views theater as an important strategy to facilitate interaction and conversation in a "communal moment of the staged event." In Spiral Ramp Library, Wang Jianwei works with a production team from China, including sound director Chen Hongli, lighting director Wang Qi, performer He Fan, and dancers Jiang Jun, Liu Bin, and Zhang Cunliang.
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#1376
January 26, 2014
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Kris Parker, Senior Publicist
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Wang Jianwei: Time Temple is made possible by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

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Thursday, February 5, 2015
10 am–1 pm

Coffee and light breakfast: 10–10:30 am
Remarks: 10:30 am
Exhibition viewing: 11 am–1 pm

On Kawara—Silence spiral_ai2.png
February 6–May 3, 2015

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
New York City

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To request an interview with the curator or to schedule a film crew, contact pressoffice@guggenheim.org.

Read the exhibition media release.


The Leadership Committee for On Kawara—Silence is gratefully acknowledged for its support, with special thanks to David Zwirner, New York/London; Glenstone; Leonard and Louise Riggio; and Konrad Fischer Galerie, Düsseldorf and Berlin.

This exhibition is also supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.



On Kawara, FEB. 5, 1970, “Tanzania took another major step today in her blueprint for socialism with an announcement that the Government would take over the entire wholesaling system.” New York, From Today, 1966-2013. Acrylic on canvas, 10 × 13 inches (25.4 × 33 cm). Private collection. Photo: Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

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GUGGENHEIM
Works & Process, the Performing-Arts Series at the Guggenheim, Announces Spring 2015 Season

Select Performances to be Livestreamed

Highlights:New Commission and World Premiere: Broken Story (wherein there is no ecstasy). Original choreography by Pam Tanowitz set to new music by Ted Hearn, David Lang, Hannah Lash, and Caroline Shaw performed by The FLUX Quartet
 
Miami City Ballet with Justin Peck & Shepard Fairey
 
The Santa Fe Opera: Cold Mountain with Jennifer Higdon
 
Fun Home on Broadway with Alison Bechdel
 
Wendy Whelan & Edward Watson
(NEW YORK, NY – December 29, 2014) – Works & Process at the Guggenheim is pleased to announce its spring 2015 season. Since 1984, the performing-arts series has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to leading creators and performers. Each intimate, 80–minute performance combines artistic creation with stimulating conversation, and takes place in the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed, 285–seat Peter B. Lewis Theater, where reserved seating is now available. A reception for the audience and artists follows most programs. Described by the New York Times as “a popular series devoted to shedding light on the creative process,” Works & Process is produced by founder Mary Sharp Cronson. Learn more about the spring 2015 season atworksandprocess.org.

Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by the Ford Foundation, The Florence Gould Foundation, The Christian Humann Foundation, Leon Levy Foundation, and Rockefeller Brothers Fund. This program is supported in part by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

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#1373
December 29, 2014
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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
212 423 3840
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GUGGENHEIM
ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s on View at the Guggenheim Museum through January 7
FINAL WEEKS
ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s
Through January 7, 2015
Described by the Wall Street Journal as “one of the most cheerful and informative shows in New York this season,” 
ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s is the first large-scale survey in a United States museum dedicated to the history of the experimental German artists’ group Zero (1957–66) and ZERO, an international network of artists that shared the group’s aspiration to redefine and transform art in the aftermath of World War II. The exhibition features work by the three core members of Group Zero—Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Günther Uecker—and by more than 30 artists from 10 countries who comprised the larger ZERO network, including Lucio Fontana, Yayoi Kusama, Yves Klein, Piero Manzoni, Jesús Rafael Soto, Jean Tinguely, and herman de vries. These artists found common cause in the desire to use novel materials drawn from everyday life, nature, and technology and to develop innovative techniques and formats such as room-scaled installations, kinetic artworks, and live art actions. Focusing on the points of intersection, exchange, and collaboration that define the ZERO artists’ shared history, the exhibition is at once a snapshot of a specific group and a portrait of a generation. ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s celebrates the pioneering nature of ZERO art and the transnational vision advanced by this network of artists during a pivotal decade.

ALSO ON VIEW:

Other current exhibitions include V. S. Gaitonde: Painting as Process, Painting as Life, the first retrospective museum exhibition dedicated to the work of celebrated Indian modern painter Vasudeo Santu Gaitonde, on view through February 11, and Wang Jianwei: Time Temple, the first of three commission-based exhibitions realized through The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chinese Art Initiative at the Guggenheim Museum, which features new work, including multimedia installation, film, and live performance, by Beijing-based artist Wang Jianwei, on view through February 16.

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#1371
December 19, 2014 
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ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s is supported by the exhibition’s Leadership Committee, with special thanks to The George Economou Collection, the committee’s Founding Member, as well as to Larry Gagosian, Axel Vervoordt Gallery, and Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson.

Additional funding is provided by Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, Anna and Gerhard Lenz, Mondriaan Fund, The David W. Bermant Foundation, and an anonymous donor.

Support for this exhibition is also provided by Sperone Westwater; Beck & Eggeling International Fine Art; Cees and Inge de Bruin; Sigifredo di Canossa; Patrick Derom; Yvonne and Edward Hillings; Dominique Lévy Gallery; Nicole and Jean-Claude Marian; The Mayor Gallery; Mnuchin Gallery; Achim Moeller, Moeller Fine Art, New York; Robert and Irmgard Rademacher Family; David Zwirner, New York/London; Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e.V. Stuttgart; Walter and Nicole Leblanc Foundation; Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany New York; The Government of Flanders through Flanders House New York; and Netherland-America Foundation.



Otto Piene, Night Sun (The Moon Upon Which It Depends) (Nachtsonne [The Moon Upon Which It Depends]), 1964–65. Oil, soot, and fixative on canvas, 150 x 200 cm. Private collection © Otto Piene. Photo: Peter Schälchli